• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Tinamidae (1 Viewer)

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Bertelli, S., Chiappe, L. M. and Mayr, G. (2014), Phylogenetic interrelationships of living and extinct Tinamidae, volant palaeognathous birds from the New World. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. Early View.

[Abstract]
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Negret, Pablo Jose and Laverde-R, Oscar. (2015). The enigmatic Black Tinamou: Do distribution, climate, and vocalizations reveal more than one species? The Auk 132(1): 132-139. [Abstract]
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Thomas Valqui, 2009. Phylogeog[r]aphy of Nothoprocta tinamous and the phylogeny of the Tinamidae. PhD dissertation, Louisiana State University.

[Abstract]
 
Last edited:

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Nothoprocta ornata

Thomas Valqui, 2009. Phylogeog[r]aphy of Nothoprocta tinamous and the phylogeny of the Tinamidae. PhD dissertation, Louisiana State University.

[Abstract]


Valqui, 2009:
Distribution of Nothoprocta ornata

...Some isolated predicted areas are of interest. To the north the largest terminal patch is partially occupied by the undescribed subspecies. It seems to be somewhat isolated by gaps in the predicted suitable habitat, but not completely so. Some of these areas were visited to see where the break or transition area was, but in areas of seemingly appropriate habitat, either no Nothoprocta was found or the species found was N. curvirostris. As seen on fig. 12 and 13, the new subspecies is isolated from branickii by poor or patchy habitat used by N. curvirostris. Also noted in fieldwork was that predicted patches for N. ornata to the north of dpto. La Libertad in dpto. Cajamarca were occupied by N. curvirostris, another example of possible interspecific competition...
 

andrew147

Well-known member
Thanks for the info Peter.

Mentioned in the abstract for the same paper is the "paraphyly of Nothoprocta pentlandii, which requires that the northern populations (Nothoprocta oustaleti) be elevated to species rank".

Do you have any insight? Which form(s) are involved in the paraphyly and which subspecies (if any) would belong to N. oustaleti?

Thanks
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Thanks for the info Peter.

Mentioned in the abstract for the same paper is the "paraphyly of Nothoprocta pentlandii, which requires that the northern populations (Nothoprocta oustaleti) be elevated to species rank".

Do you have any insight? Which form(s) are involved in the paraphyly and which subspecies (if any) would belong to N. oustaleti?

Thanks


Valqui, 2009:
My data produce a substantially different phylogeny (fig. 5) from any other proposed for Nothoprocta. The most divergent result is the paraphyly of Nothoprocta pentlandii. The clade composed of N. pentlandii (races pentlandii and patriciae, and allegedly doeringi and mendozae) with N. perdicaria, is sister to N. taczanowskii in every recovered tree with high (1.00) Bayesian posterior probability. The group of N. pentlandii oustaleti (with races fulvescens and allegedly ambigua and niethammeri) is not even basal to this group, and therefore needs to be considered a different species by any phylogenetic criterion. As seen in section 2.3.1., (table 2) this split is also supported by indels.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Tinamus guttatus

Mei An, Zhi Zhang, Xiangfeng Li, Shuang Yang. The complete mitochondrial genome of the White-throated Tinamou, Tinamus guttatus (Tinamiformes, Tinamidae). Mitochondrial DNA. Posted online on 21 Jul 2015.

Abstract
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
VITOR GOMES, LUÍS FÁBIO SILVEIRA (2021). On the validity and taxonomic status of Crypturellus obsoletus griseiventris (Salvadori, 1895) and C. o. hypochraceus (Miranda-Ribeiro, 1938) (Aves, Tinamidae)

Abstract
The nine currently recognized subspecies in the Brown Tinamou (Crypturellus obsoletus) complex are disjunctly widespread in South America, and at least three of them occur in Brazil. Morphological diagnosis of most of these taxa is imprecise, in contrast with consistent vocal differences described in the literature. We conducted a taxonomic review of two Amazonian taxa, C. o. griseiventris and C. o. hypochraceus, using morphological, morphometric, and vocal characters. Our results indicate that C. o. hypochraceus (Miranda-Ribeiro, 1938) is a junior synonym of C. o. griseiventris (Salvadori, 1895), and that Crypturellus griseiventris (Salvadori, 1895) must be treated as a full species, based on unique and fully diagnosable plumage and vocal patterns.


Crypturellus griseiventris (Salvadori, 1895)
French name : Tinamou à ventre gris

English name: Gray-bellied Tinamou
 
Last edited:

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Last edited:

andrew147

Well-known member

Need a new genus for :

'Nothoprocta' cinerascens

'Nothura' minor, maculosa, darwini

Or, considering the age of many tinamou lineages and the small number of genera always used, cinerascens could be included in Rhynchotus and all Nothura except boraquira could be included in Taoniscus.

The recognition of two tinamou families would also be good - the two main group (forest/open country) are always shown to have separated around 40 million years ago.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Or, considering the age of many tinamou lineages and the small number of genera always used, cinerascens could be included in Rhynchotus and all Nothura except boraquira could be included in Taoniscus.

The recognition of two tinamou families would also be good - the two main group (forest/open country) are always shown to have separated around 40 million years ago.
You read it ?
 

Maffong

Well-known member
Or, considering the age of many tinamou lineages and the small number of genera always used, cinerascens could be included in Rhynchotus and all Nothura except boraquira could be included in Taoniscus.

The recognition of two tinamou families would also be good - the two main group (forest/open country) are always shown to have separated around 40 million years ago.
I've just looked at the figures and not read the whole thing, but why not simply add Taoniscus to Nothura (thus keeping consistency between English and scientific names for most Nothuras) as well as as merging Rhynchotus into Nothoprocta?
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
I've just looked at the figures and not read the whole thing, but why not simply add Taoniscus to Nothura (thus keeping consistency between English and scientific names for most Nothuras) as well as as merging Rhynchotus into Nothoprocta?
It would not be consistent with the old age of the clades. Generally, the average divergence time is 10 mya. Here, we far exceed 25 mya !
 

Maffong

Well-known member
That would be merging Nothoprocta (1873) into Rhynchotus (1825).
Would be fine by me. Or just merge N. cinerascens into Rhynchotus. Sounds more sensible to me, than to create a new genus for that one species.
 
Last edited:

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
Also of interest is the age of divergence of many of these groups, which is pushed back mostly into the Paleocene. This would suggest that the traditional treatment of these different groups as orders is perhaps more justified than recent studies suggest, if age is a criteria. Of course some of this could be in part driven by lack of calibrations points much beyond the paleognaths?
 

mb1848

Well-known member
For a new genus I suggest Burmeisteria because he named the sole species? And they are taking all of the English names away from dead white guys.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

Users who are viewing this thread

Top