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Trinovid 10x42 (2012-2015 edition) impressions (1 Viewer)

SeldomPerched

Well-known member
John, you’re right, Leica do say that, but surely it must be a mistake? Leica isn’t known for the accuracy of their published technical specifications.........

Edit: The 10x32 is slightly heavier than the 8x32, as would be expected, at 565 and 535 grams respectively, but in any event the 7x42 must be the lightest of the three 42mm's because it has fewer glass elements than the 8x and 10x.

Mike and John, if I am understanding your gist correctly it does happen that 10s can weigh less than 8s. For instance my Swarovski SLC 10x42 is shorter than and lighter than the 8x version. To do with the eyepieces I am told.

Tom
 

SeldomPerched

Well-known member
Yes, I tried one briefly, but I have no interest anymore in going back up to 42mm binos. I think it will be smaller lighter-weight from now on.

I'm happy with the original CL 8x30 right now and don't see anything else I want except for the Ultravid HD+ 8x32 , but ER is very short unfortunately on the little Uvid.

Yes, it is, isn't it? - I have used one quite a lot and it took me a time to get used to it. I tend to hold bins against my eyebrows so on most I only need to pull out the eyeshade rings (sorry - senior moment, can't think what they are called!) one detent or less if at all. Also my hands are not that big so I can find enough space on the UV 8x32 to hold them comfortably. I like that I can take something like that out for a walk whereas I'd get fed up hiking all day with any 42.

Tom
 

A2GG

Beth
Supporter
United States
Yes, it is, isn't it? - I have used one quite a lot and it took me a time to get used to it. I tend to hold bins against my eyebrows so on most I only need to pull out the eyeshade rings (sorry - senior moment, can't think what they are called!) one detent or less if at all. Also my hands are not that big so I can find enough space on the UV 8x32 to hold them comfortably. I like that I can take something like that out for a walk whereas I'd get fed up hiking all day with any 42.

Tom

I wear eyeglasses and the 8x32 didn't have enough ER when I tried the HD+ when it first came out.

However, I bought super thin eyeglass frames since then and wonder if I can get by now with it. Maybe someday I'll try it out and see if it works for me, but I'm hesitant about spending anymore money on binoculars. I'm content at this point with the CL.
 

eitanaltman

Well-known member
I believe I’ve said this before, but I think I have an unusual way of holding binoculars. However I find this grip extremely comfortable and stable/steady on all my bins, from x25 to x50.......

Interesting! I gave this a shot this morning with the Trinovids and it seems to work to distribute the weight/bulk a bit. Still not a huge fan of the way the bridge is so large and raised vs a more open barrel, but after using them for a couple of weeks I've gotten to the point where I've gotten used to them and can keep them steady and don't notice nearly as much.

Again it's more the shape than the weight, really.

The funny thing is, after using the Trinnies almost exclusively, I grabbed my little 8x32 Meostars and suddenly they felt weirdly small! So some of this is just familiarity.
 

eitanaltman

Well-known member
A good review Eitan, and glad you're enjoying your new Trinovid. I still like it myself. A few random notes:

Eyecups -- I can't use the Ultravid 42 because they're not deep enough; with this Trinovid they just work. To your comments about steps I'll add that you can even rotate a bit beyond the top one to get a bit more extension; the eyecup could now be pulled straight out to remove it (the serial number is under the right one) but that takes considerable force, so it's safe to use.

Weight -- The UV 42 is 1-2oz lighter but a titanium focus axle instead of steel is the only documented difference. They feel quite the same in hand.

Optics -- I notice a distinct difference (have you?) between this model and other Leicas. The sweet spot seems modestly larger, and there's less pincushion distortion so lines stay straighter but panning gets a bit more interesting. I like this. (I always assumed it was an experiment that Leica decided against, and part of the reason these were 42s only and then discontinued.)

Thanks for the comments. As to the distortion difference, can't really help there. The only other Ultravid that I have on hand is my wife's 8x32 UVHD, and it's not apples to apples with the 10x42 TV. I haven't noticed anything specific, it seems to have a mild bit of pincushion but feels fairly typical for a well corrected, "classic edge" binocular without a super wide FOV.

If there is a difference, perhaps it wasn't an intentional experiment that was abandoned but simply a consequence of a different eyepiece design. The Trinovids have a slightly narrower FOV than the analogous Ultravid, which I would assume is due to the eyepiece design. Pure speculation, but perhaps they went with a slightly eyepiece to cut costs and also create a small differentiation from the Ultravid in the FOV spec. And, a byproduct of that change was a slightly different distortion profile?
 

Mike F

Well-known member
Mike and John, if I am understanding your gist correctly it does happen that 10s can weigh less than 8s. For instance my Swarovski SLC 10x42 is shorter than and lighter than the 8x version. To do with the eyepieces I am told.

Tom

Tom, I've just weighed my 7x42's and they're 750g (without strap or covers). Given that all the x42 UV's are the same physical size but the 7x actually has less glass, I presume that Leica just mixed the specs up. I don't have them to check, but in all probability the 10x is heavier than the 8x, as with the 10x and 8x 32's.
 

SeldomPerched

Well-known member
Tom, I've just weighed my 7x42's and they're 750g (without strap or covers). Given that all the x42 UV's are the same physical size but the 7x actually has less glass, I presume that Leica just mixed the specs up. I don't have them to check, but in all probability the 10x is heavier than the 8x, as with the 10x and 8x 32's.

Mike,

Yes, fair enough - that seems quite likely!

Tom
 

John Frink

Well-known member
Given that all the x42 UV's are the same physical size but the 7x actually has less glass, I presume that Leica just mixed the specs up. I don't have them to check, but in all probability the 10x is heavier than the 8x, as with the 10x and 8x 32's.
Hey Mike,
Leica's technical data sheet for the 2012-15 Trinovids gives the following weights: 10x42 = 795g; 8x42 = 810g. Strange, eh?
 

Mike F

Well-known member
Hey Mike,
Leica's technical data sheet for the 2012-15 Trinovids gives the following weights: 10x42 = 795g; 8x42 = 810g. Strange, eh?

Hi John. Yes, strange indeed! ;)

As I said, Leica isn't known for the accuracy of their published technical data!
 

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jremmons

Wildlife Biologist
I believe I’ve said this before, but I think I have an unusual way of holding binoculars. However I find this grip extremely comfortable and stable/steady on all my bins, from x25 to x50.......

You're not alone in this method. This is how I tend to hold all of my full sized binoculars, particularly when engaged in longer viewing sessions. It may look a little odd, but I have found it provides a more stable platform overall as well as easier positioning of the hands.

Justin
 

eitanaltman

Well-known member
I've been using this hold on the Trinovids the past couple days and it really helps! Still doesn't resolve the issue with the high bridge getting in the way of my last two (non-focusing) fingers on my right hand, but it makes the binocular feel less bulky/chunky and distributes the weight better, and is definitely more stable for long range scanning. Thanks for the suggestion!
 

eitanaltman

Well-known member
Eyecups -- I can't use the Ultravid 42 because they're not deep enough; with this Trinovid they just work. To your comments about steps I'll add that you can even rotate a bit beyond the top one to get a bit more extension; the eyecup could now be pulled straight out to remove it (the serial number is under the right one) but that takes considerable force, so it's safe to use.

I forgot to thank you for this comment!! I didn't realize the Trinovid eyecups were removable, I assumed that if so they would screw out like my wife's 8x32 UVHD. So I tried to apply a little force to see if they "unlocked" and screwed out after the final stop, but they didn't give so I assumed that was an upgrade on the Ultravids.

I recently had a horrible experience with my 8x32 Cabela's Euro HD (Meostar) where one eyecup got stuck and when I applied force to get it to screw out I ended up torquing the entire ocular assembly and wrecking the collimation! So I was very gun shy about applying too much force and breaking anything.

Thanks to your tip, I figured out how easy it is to remove the eyecups. And I see what you mean about that extra extension stop when you pull them out, that means these binoculars literally have NINE potential fixed eyecup positions that will hold their position firmly!

With the eyecups removed, I'm even more impressed at how robust and well engineered they are! Most binoculars have a hollow, thin metal cylinder with grooves to guide the rotating barrel, and is virtually guaranteed to bend and deform from the impact if you accidentally drop the binocular and it lands on that end (as it always does).

The Trinovids (and I assume other 42mm+ Leicas as well, have never checked) have a super beefy ocular assembly, it's a solid cylinder with these small metal "button" protrusions that provide resistance and lock into the detents. The eyecup itself is hard plastic with grooves and detents for the little metal buttons to click into.

It's a really ingenious and simple design that allows the eyecups to lock into place firmly. I'm shocked that other manufacturers haven't copied this obviously superior approach vs the typical "thin metal cylinder" design, but maybe Leica has patented this specific method so they can't?

The softer, more brittle plastic eyecup cylinder would probably also absorb most of the shock from an impact. I suspect on a normal drop from a few feet up that would wreck most other binoculars, on these Trinovids the worst that would happen is the plastic eyecup barrel cracks and you can just replace it.
 

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SeldomPerched

Well-known member
I've been using this hold on the Trinovids the past couple days and it really helps! Still doesn't resolve the issue with the high bridge getting in the way of my last two (non-focusing) fingers on my right hand, but it makes the binocular feel less bulky/chunky and distributes the weight better, and is definitely more stable for long range scanning. Thanks for the suggestion!

Eitan, I have been using my UV 7x42 HD Plus today and have just had a look at the binoculars to compare them with your photo of the TV 10x42. I don't see any difference in space and layout for your little fingers to grasp. I am holding the 7s as follows:

LH thumb resting against far side of thumb rest; RH thumb on near side (i.e. face side). Middle 3 LH fingers along the top of the deck and up the curved ramp or transition, with the fingertips just above the rounded coping at the top of the skateboard ramp (aka. 1/4 pipe). Middle 3 RH fingers: first one atop the milled edge focus wheel, the next two atop the plain cylinder in front, i.e. the skaters have overshot the ramp. Last LH and RH finger falling short of cresting the final short section of cylinder that stretches out beyond the skateboard ramp.

It sounds as though your hands might be bigger than mine, but my great aunt always held it brought bad luck to compare hands!

Looking on the bright if frivolous side, you now know that the aesthetics of 21st century Leicas were created by 'Skater Bois'! **

Tom
 
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AGPank

Well-known member
I bought a pair of the 10x42 when they first went on sale. It was my first pair of Leica’s and I really enjoyed them. Like others noted my only negative on them is the CA control. I later found another 8x42 and bought them for my dad. I don’t think he’s taken them outside, he says they are too nice.
I later found a deal on both EL SV 8x32 and 10x42 that have got most of my use the last few years.
Last week I found a deal on a Noctivid 8x42 and I’m impressed. I got out all the binos yesterday and spent a little time behind them all. The Trinovids hold their own. The colors through Leica just appear truer to my eyes.
This run of Trinovids doesn’t get talked about much, but I sure don’t see them for sell very often either, which should say something.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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