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Trinovid hd 8x32 report (1 Viewer)

Gijs van Ginkel

Well-known member
Trinovid 8x32,
Production started in 1974 with serial number 40208.It is produced until 1990, so your sample seems from a few years after 1974.
Gijs van Ginkel
 
Trinovid 8x32,
Production started in 1974 with serial number 40208.It is produced until 1990, so your sample seems from a few years after 1974.
Gijs van Ginkel
Doesn't it seem that from 40208 to 945731 would make mine from closer to the end of the run? That's a difference of 905523 and I would suspect that going from the 40,000 range to 945,000 should be enough to separate them by at least a decade if not more.

Thanks for coming up with the starting figure and maybe if someone knew what the final serial number range was could be even more helpful.
 

Renze de Vries

Well-known member
Doesn't it seem that from 40208 to 945731 would make mine from closer to the end of the run? That's a difference of 905523 and I would suspect that going from the 40,000 range to 945,000 should be enough to separate them by at least a decade if not more.

Thanks for coming up with the starting figure and maybe if someone knew what the final serial number range was could be even more helpful.

Your Leitz Trinovid 8x32B # 945731 was manufactured in 1983. The range going from # 625001 in 1962 to at least # 993978 in 1988 (the last being a BA).

Renze
 
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Foss

Well-known member
I believe the 8x32b doesn't have phase correction, the latest coating system, or the same type of prisms. I imagine you'd be well satisfied with the improvement the HDs offer. If you were starting with a BA or BN model, not so much. (have owned: several 7x35bs, BAs, and BNs. still own 8x32 & 42 HD)
 

tenex

reality-based
Phase coatings were introduced c.1988, so this is a rather antiquated model though it still has its fans. (Uppendahl prisms!) You might actually like a Trinovid BA/BN, which would be a significant improvement itself, or of course a recent HD or UV model at greater cost. We still have and like a BN 32, as well as a UV.
 

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I believe the 8x32b doesn't have phase correction, the latest coating system, or the same type of prisms. I imagine you'd be well satisfied with the improvement the HDs offer. If you were starting with a BA or BN model, not so much. (have owned: several 7x35bs, BAs, and BNs. still own 8x32 & 42 HD)
Did all three improvements happen with the introduction of the BA model then?
 

tenex

reality-based
Did all three improvements happen with the introduction of the BA model then?
Schmidt-Pechan prisms weren't an improvement over Uppendahl (arguably the reverse!) just more standard. But I believe that old-style Trinovids manufactured after 1988 should at least have phase coatings; that's how it worked with Zeiss Dialyts that became P*. (Someone here might even know the relevant serial numbers.) Leica was very proud of the BA model which they called Trinovid "Ultra" (later quietly dropped): diopter integrated with focuser, collapsible eyecups, waterproof... it really defined the modern binocular. BNs focused closer. Ultravids are lighter, and of course benefit from continued improvement of coatings. I could reach for any of these and be happy myself. Or if you like the original style, there are cute retro Trinovid models with modern glass at Leica shops as well, highly regarded by some here (search for "Retrovid").

Oops, forgot to mention the HD model. It has a narrower field of view and separate diopter, but otherwise a similar optical design and seems quite nice. I haven't tried one.
 
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Patudo

Well-known member
I just got my first decent binoculars (Trinovid 8x32b) and have instantly regretted not getting them years ago. Every time I use them it becomes more obvious how they carry none of the frustrations I've seen with far too many binoculars over the years and every time that I've used something in the past that seemed impressive, they also turned out to be far too expensive for my needs.

Now that I've got them though, I keep thinking of the Ultravid or Trinovid HD and your review is exactly what I needed to see. Not only did you compare the two models I've been considering, you also seem to go much further into realms of detail than my novice eye is able to detect.

One thing I'd still like to find more information on though, which seems to be all but lacking in my searches so far, is a comparison to find out how much, and what kind of advantages I'll be getting in going from the 8x32b to the HD model...

May I offer a different take on things? It's clear to see that you've arrived at a "happy place" with your new-to-you Leitz 8x32B. It might not be the worst idea to stop right there and not go any further down the rabbit hole. I say that because quite a few folks here have spent thousands upon thousands of dollars/pounds/euros in order to get to the same happy place that you've found yourself in now, and some still haven't gotten there after years of searching and trying. Seriously, before delving into all the exotica about prism types, coatings and so on - think about how satisfied you are with your current binoculars, and whether you really want to go on what could be a long and expensive journey that may end up with you being more educated, more discerning, but not necessarily happier.

If you want/need to feel better about your current binoculars compared to modern ones, give this a read:

"Male birders, as opposed to birdwatchers, are more interested in their scopes and binoculars than the birds. It's the same as comparing audiophiles to music lovers: the audiophiles are more interested in their record players than the music."

I need to note I don't agree with everything Mr Rockwell says - but I do agree that the classic Leitz Trinovids do certain things exceptionally well. Their handling and form factor is still outstanding today, and the mechanical excellence that was one of their hallmarks very much evident in the ones I've handled. The binoculars of the 1950s-60s era are often praised for the quality of their workmanship compared to many modern offerings, and the Leitzes I've seen are amongst the very best in that respect. There is a pleasure in handling and operating something so beautifully put together that is part of the reason why the best of that generation of binoculars are still valued today.

Now if your needs are demanding - if you need a binocular that will withstand hard use in the field, or if you need serious optical performance - by all means go down that rabbit hole. But if you're mainly a backyard or park birder, or a casual observer, you might find compactness, ease of handling and mechanical quality and reliability that has proven itself over decades more important than alpha-level optics.
 
...classic Leitz Trinovids do certain things exceptionally well. Their handling and form factor is still outstanding today, and the mechanical excellence that was one of their hallmarks very much evident in the ones I've handled. The binoculars of the 1950s-60s era are often praised for the quality of their workmanship compared to many modern offerings, and the Leitzes I've seen are amongst the very best in that respect. There is a pleasure in handling and operating something so beautifully put together that is part of the reason why the best of that generation of binoculars are still valued today.
I'm really happy with these so far because I've never had a 'need' for any binoculars really, other than when out on salt water for days at a time, and the boat already had some 7x35's of some sort that seemed to work well enough in low light and everything else. Too bulky for me to get interested in though, except for as a bridge tool.

Most likely I won't be buying anything else in a hurry, but I'd really like to have something else in the same type of high quality, compact package that is so easy to look through, but also works better in lower light situations.

Thanks for offering support for my present binoculars.
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
United States
I'd really like to have something else in the same type of high quality, compact package that is so easy to look through, but also works better in lower light situations.
Does the Trinovid HD 8x42 qualify as a compact enough package for you? 5.5" x 4.6" x 2.6"

Or, is their size as "bulky", or more so, as your 7x35s? For the class, they are very compact. Quite suitable for the lower light situations you are considering.

If the size and weight is acceptable, the Trinovid HD 8x42 bins would seem suitable for your objective. And, at half the price of alphas. If not...

MORE COMPACT
UltravidHD+ and Trinovid HD in 8x32 are excellent alternatives - high quality, very compact, light weight. Not quite as suitable to lower light situations as the 42s, but personally, I find them to be quite useable in lower light.

You would need to confirm the "easy to look through" aspect, for each of these, with a personal test. Differences in eye relief, inter-pupillary distance, feel-in-the-hand, eyecup feel - all to be evaluated in person.

If you don't have good local shops to personally test these, you might consider ordering from B&H Photo in NYC. They offer free 2-day FedEx shipping, and have a very easy, pain-free, generous 30-day return period, though you would quite likely be able to make your determination within a few days of careful use. Whatever you wish to return, simply because you choose not to keep them, B&H supplies a FedEx return label, for which they only deduct $10 from your refund.

These are among the most compact bins in each of their classes:
8x42 Trinovid HD 5.5" x 4.6" x 2.6". 25.8 oz.
8x42 Ultravid HD+ 5.6" x 4.8" x 2.6". 27.9 oz.

8x32 Trinovid HD 5.1" x 4.6" x 2.5". 22.9 oz.
8x32 Ultravid HD+ 4.6" x 4.6" x 2.2". 18.9 oz.

As mentioned elsewhere, the 7x35 Retrovids might suit your needs quite well, also.

To my eyes, the UVHD+ brings an extra edge of clarity and sharpness over the Trinovid HD, but the difference is not large and is only noticed when doing careful, side-by-side comparison. Both are quite pleasingly sharp and crisp!
 
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eitanaltman

Well-known member
I just got my first decent binoculars (Trinovid 8x32b) and have instantly regretted not getting them years ago. Every time I use them it becomes more obvious how they carry none of the frustrations I've seen with far too many binoculars over the years and every time that I've used something in the past that seemed impressive, they also turned out to be far too expensive for my needs.

Now that I've got them though, I keep thinking of the Ultravid or Trinovid HD and your review is exactly what I needed to see. Not only did you compare the two models I've been considering, you also seem to go much further into realms of detail than my novice eye is able to detect.

One thing I'd still like to find more information on though, which seems to be all but lacking in my searches so far, is a comparison to find out how much, and what kind of advantages I'll be getting in going from the 8x32b to the HD model. Hopefully someone out there will have had both models and I also suspect that the older model will end up being the car binocular, or vice versa when I do buy an upgrade.
There's a pretty big difference optically between a binocular of that era and a modern unit. There have been major advances in coatings and glass technology in the intervening decades, not just phase coating but also advanced multicoatings, anti-reflection coatings, dielectric coatings on roof prism mirrors. The workmanship and mechanical quality of those old Trinnies is unsurpassed, but a modern high-end optic will have a noticeably brighter, sharper, clearer view, in addition to the field niceties like waterproofness and improved close focus.

Unfortunately, the "how much?" is very subjective, a few hours browsing this forum will show a wide range of opinions. So the best thing you can do is order from a store with a good return policy and try them yourself to determine if it's worth it.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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