• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Troglodytidae (1 Viewer)

l_raty

laurent raty
Art. 56.2. One-letter difference

Even if the difference between two genus-group names is only one letter, they are not homonyms.
Yes -- but it has not always been so. No explicit rules were given in the AOU Code prior to the 1908 edition, but Richmond in 1902 was probably using unwritten rules similar to those that were added at that time. See: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.32044062470786&view=1up&seq=64
I assume Leucolepis is what Richmond called Leucolepia?
yes, obviously.
 

Taphrospilus

Well-known member
Anyone knows why Allan Robert Phillips lumped Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus infuscatus with Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus richardsoni (according IOC World bird list)? In Handbook of the Birds of the World it is still a subspecies but ''C. p. chocoanus'' is in question. Has this complex ever been analysed deeper with genetic, vocalization and/or morphological differentiation?
 

DDonsker

David Donsker
Anyone knows why Allan Robert Phillips lumped Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus infuscatus with Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus richardsoni (according IOC World bird list)? In Handbook of the Birds of the World it is still a subspecies but ''C. p. chocoanus'' is in question. Has this complex ever been analysed deeper with genetic, vocalization and/or morphological differentiation?

The comment in the IOC list is misleading. Actually, the merger of infuscatus with richardsoni should be attributed to Dickinson & Christidis (2014) referencing Phillips. A direct reading of Phillips is a little confusing, but it appears that he actually does recognize infuscatus. Rather, he has a note under infuscatus, but which seems to actually apply to richardsoni, that implies that the distinctiveness of the (then) poorly known and limited range richardsoni, with few actual specimens, may be unclear given that "the first specimen from a region is not always representative" and that "variation in Cyphorhinus is impressive".

Given this lack of clarity, and that infuscatus is recognized by most other sources, we will add infuscatus as a subspecies, and also a comment about the questionable validity of chocoanus.

Thanks for bringing this up.
 

Taphrospilus

Well-known member
Cyphorhinus arada modulator

I am wondering about the publication date of Cyphorhinus arada modulator. IOC World bird list here claims 1838. I personally tink OD here, but Avibase claims here (think p. 193 is a typo). If correct On the dates of publication of the natural history portions of Alcide d'Orbigny's ‘Voyage Amérique méridionale.’ from Charles Davies Sherborn & Francis James Griffin page 230 of Oiseaux is livresaon 35 from 1837. At least I can't read any controversial from here regarding this name.

So why 1838?
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Is it related with this?

 

albertonykus

Well-known member
Mikkelsen, E.K. and D. Irwin (2021)
Ongoing production of low-fitness hybrids limits range overlap between divergent cryptic species
Molecular Ecology (advance online publication)
doi: 10.1111/mec.16015

Contact zones between recently-diverged taxa provide opportunities to examine the causes of reproductive isolation and the processes that determine whether two species can coexist over a broad region. The Pacific Wren (Troglodytes pacificus) and Winter Wren (Troglodytes hiemalis) are two morphologically similar songbirds that started diverging about 4 million years ago, older than most sister species pairs of temperate songbirds. The ranges of these species come into narrow contact in western Canada, where the two species remain distinct. To assess evidence for differentiation, hybridization, and introgression in this system, we examined variation in over 250,000 single nucleotide polymorphism markers distributed across the genome. The two species formed highly divergent genetic clusters, consistent with long-term differentiation. In a set of 75 individuals, two first-generation hybrids (i.e., F1’s) were detected, indicating only moderate levels of assortative mating between these taxa. We found no recent backcrosses or other evidence of recent breeding success of F1’s, indicating very low or zero fitness of F1 hybrids. Examination of genomic variation shows evidence for only a single backcrossing event many generations ago. The moderate rate of hybridization combined with very low F1 hybrid fitness is expected to result in a population sink in the contact zone, largely explaining the narrow overlap of the two species. If such dynamics are common in nature, they could explain the narrow range overlap often observed between pairs of closely related species.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France

Hernán Vázquez-Miranda, F. Keith Barker (2021). Autosomal, sex-linked and mitochondrial loci resolve evolutionary relationships among wrens in the genus Campylorhynchus. In press, Available online 2 July 2021.



Abstract
Although there is general consensus that sampling of multiple genetic loci is critical in accurate reconstruction of species trees, the exact numbers and the best types of molecular markers remain an open question. In particular, the phylogenetic utility of sex-linked loci is underexplored. Here, we sample all species and 70% of the named diversity of the New World wren genus Campylorhynchus using sequences from 23 loci, to evaluate the effects of linkage on efficiency in recovering a well-supported tree for the group. At a tree-wide level, we found that most loci supported fewer than half the possible clades and that sex-linked loci produced similar resolution to slower-coalescing autosomal markers, controlling for locus length. By contrast, we did find evidence that linkage affected the efficiency of recovery of individual relationships; as few as two sex-linked loci were necessary to resolve a selection of clades with long to medium subtending branches, whereas 4-6 autosomal loci were necessary to achieve comparable results. These results support an expanded role for sampling of the avian Z chromosome in phylogenetic studies, including target enrichment approaches. Our concatenated and species tree analyses represent significant improvements in our understanding of diversification in Campylorhynchus, and suggest a relatively complex scenario for its radiation across the Miocene/Pliocene boundary, with multiple invasions of South America.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France

Hernán Vázquez-Miranda, F. Keith Barker (2021). Autosomal, sex-linked and mitochondrial loci resolve evolutionary relationships among wrens in the genus Campylorhynchus. In press, Available online 2 July 2021.



Abstract
Although there is general consensus that sampling of multiple genetic loci is critical in accurate reconstruction of species trees, the exact numbers and the best types of molecular markers remain an open question. In particular, the phylogenetic utility of sex-linked loci is underexplored. Here, we sample all species and 70% of the named diversity of the New World wren genus Campylorhynchus using sequences from 23 loci, to evaluate the effects of linkage on efficiency in recovering a well-supported tree for the group. At a tree-wide level, we found that most loci supported fewer than half the possible clades and that sex-linked loci produced similar resolution to slower-coalescing autosomal markers, controlling for locus length. By contrast, we did find evidence that linkage affected the efficiency of recovery of individual relationships; as few as two sex-linked loci were necessary to resolve a selection of clades with long to medium subtending branches, whereas 4-6 autosomal loci were necessary to achieve comparable results. These results support an expanded role for sampling of the avian Z chromosome in phylogenetic studies, including target enrichment approaches. Our concatenated and species tree analyses represent significant improvements in our understanding of diversification in Campylorhynchus, and suggest a relatively complex scenario for its radiation across the Miocene/Pliocene boundary, with multiple invasions of South America.
If anyone can send me this paper please
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top