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Turdidae (1 Viewer)

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Avendaño, J. E., E. Arbeláez-Cortés & C. D. Cadena. On the importance of geographic and taxonomic sampling in phylogeography: a reevaluation of diversification and species limits in a Neotropical thrush (Aves, Turdidae). In review.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Avendaño, J. E., E. Arbeláez-Cortés & C. D. Cadena. On the importance of geographic and taxonomic sampling in phylogeography: a reevaluation of diversification and species limits in a Neotropical thrush (Aves, Turdidae). In review.

Available online 24 March 2017 (Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution)

Abstract:

Phylogeographic studies seeking to describe biogeographic patterns, infer evolutionary processes, and revise species-level classification should properly characterize the distribution ranges of study species, and thoroughly sample genetic variation across taxa and geography. This is particularly necessary for widely distributed organisms occurring in complex landscapes, such as the Neotropical region. Here, we clarify the geographic range and revisit the phylogeography of the Black-billed Thrush (Turdus ignobilis), a common passerine bird from lowland tropical South America, whose evolutionary relationships and species limits were recently evaluated employing phylogeographic analyses based on partial knowledge of its distribution and incomplete sampling of populations. Our work employing mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences sampled all named subspecies and multiple populations across northern South America, and uncovered patterns not apparent in earlier work, including a biogeographic interplay between the Amazon and Orinoco basins and the occurrence of distinct lineages with seemingly different habitat affinities in regional sympatry in the Colombian Amazon. In addition, we found that previous inferences about the affinities and taxonomic status of Andean populations assumed to be allied to populations from the Pantepui region were incorrect, implying that inferred biogeographic and taxonomic scenarios need re-evaluation. We propose a new taxonomic treatment, which recognizes two distinct biological species in the group. Our findings illustrate the importance of sufficient taxon and geographic sampling to reconstruct evolutionary history and to evaluate species limits among Neotropical organisms. Considering the scope of the questions asked, advances in Neotropical phylogeography will often require substantial cross-country scientific collaboration.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Avendaño, J. E., E. Arbeláez-Cortés & C. D. Cadena. On the importance of geographic and taxonomic sampling in phylogeography: a reevaluation of diversification and species limits in a Neotropical thrush (Aves, Turdidae). In review.

TiF Update April 8, 2017

It is clear from several sources (e.g., Voelker et al., 2007; Nylander et al., 2008; Cerqueira et al., 2016; Avendaño et al, 2017) that Turdus subalaris and Turdus nigriceps are not close relatives. IOC has split them for a while, and I do so now. Slaty Thrush, Turdus nigriceps, is split into Eastern Slaty Thrush, Turdus subalaris, and Andean Slaty Thrush, Turdus nigriceps. I'm not fond of the names, but that is what IOC and the HBW Checklist (del Hoyo and N.J. Collar, 2016) use.

Avendaño et al. (2017) have made a closer study of the Black-billed Thrush complex, including all the relevant subspecies. As a result, I have split Tepui Thrush, Turdus murinus, from Black-billed Thrush, Turdus ignobilis, and lumped Amazonian Thrush, Turdus debilis, into Black-billed Thrush, Turdus ignobilis. Further study may show that T.debilis deserves recognition as a separate species.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Restoring the species status of Catharus maculatus (Aves: Turdidae), a secretive Andean thrush, with a critique of the yardstick approach to species delimitation
MATTHEW R. HALLEY, JOHN C. KLICKA, PAUL R. SESINK CLEE, JASON D. WECKSTEIN

Abstract

In the 1850s, two species of "Spotted" Nightingale-Thrush (Aves: Catharus) were independently described from montane rainforests of Guatemala, C. dryas (Gould, 1855) and Ecuador, C. maculatus (Sclater, 1858). However, due to similarities in plumage color, C. maculatus was reclassified as a subspecies of C. dryas in 1878, a decision that has been upheld for 137 years. We collected multiple lines of evidence including phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences (ND2), discriminant and principal components analysis of morphometric and vocal data, and statistical modeling of ecological niches, that collectively indicate that C. d. dryas and C. d. maculatus are independent species. We recommend restoring species status to C. maculatus of South America and applying the common name Sclater’s Nightingale-Thrush to this species.


http://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4276.3.4
 

Daniel Philippe

Well-known member
Grey-cheeked Thrush

Found on NBHC ID-FRONTIERS

All,
You can download the article here
http://www.ace-eco.org/vol12/iss1/art10/
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
[email protected]
www.alvarosadventures.com
-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Ron Pittaway
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 5:27 PM
To: [email protected]
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Gray-cheeked x Bicknell's Thrush Hybrid

FitzGerald et al (2017) report that a putative Gray-cheeked x Bicknell's Thrush hybrid was captured in southern Labrador: "We also found that the degree of genetic divergence within Gray-cheeked Thrushes was similar to that found in Bicknell's Thrushes, and that these two species are divergent from one another at a deeper level, with the important exception of one putative hybrid individual that we captured in southern Labrador. This bird was phenotypically a Gray-cheeked Thrush, but possessed a Bicknell's Thrush mitochondrial haplotype. At the nuclear FIB7 intron, the putative hybrid possessed a T allele that had a frequency of 0.014 in Gray-cheeked Thrush (including the putative hybrid) and 0.886 in Bicknell's Thrush, suggesting that the heterozygosity at this site may be due to hybridization rather than retained ancestral polymorphism. The mitochondrial haplotype of the putative hybrid from southern Labrador, the allele frequency distributions of FIB7, and the fact that all heterozygous Bicknell's Thrushes were sampled in the northern reaches of that species' range suggest that occasional hybridization may occur where their ranges abut along the north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence or on islands around Nova Scotia and in the gulf, as suggested by Marshall (2001). The geographic boundaries of the breeding ranges of these two species are not clearly established and they may have been separated by less than 60 km along the north shore of the Gulf of St.Lawrence in the past century (Marshall 2001) before the breeding range of Bicknell's Thrush became more restricted (Ouellet 1993, COSEWIC 2009)."

Subspecies: The authors also report that "Our results support previous designations of C. m. minimus from Newfoundland and southeastern Labrador as a subspecies distinct from C. m. aliciae found further west."

Literature Cited: FitzGerald, A.M., D.M. Whitaker, J. Ralston, J.J.Kirchman, and I.G. Warkentin. 2017. Taxonomy and distribution of the imperiled Newfoundland Gray-cheeked Thrush, Catharus minimus minimus. Avian Conservation and Ecology 12(1):10.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Catharus maculatus

Restoring the species status of Catharus maculatus (Aves: Turdidae), a secretive Andean thrush, with a critique of the yardstick approach to species delimitation
MATTHEW R. HALLEY, JOHN C. KLICKA, PAUL R. SESINK CLEE, JASON D. WECKSTEIN

Abstract

In the 1850s, two species of "Spotted" Nightingale-Thrush (Aves: Catharus) were independently described from montane rainforests of Guatemala, C. dryas (Gould, 1855) and Ecuador, C. maculatus (Sclater, 1858). However, due to similarities in plumage color, C. maculatus was reclassified as a subspecies of C. dryas in 1878, a decision that has been upheld for 137 years. We collected multiple lines of evidence including phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences (ND2), discriminant and principal components analysis of morphometric and vocal data, and statistical modeling of ecological niches, that collectively indicate that C. d. dryas and C. d. maculatus are independent species. We recommend restoring species status to C. maculatus of South America and applying the common name Sclater’s Nightingale-Thrush to this species.


http://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4276.3.4

IOC Updates Diary Oct 12

Accept Sclater’s Nightingale-Thrush
 

Björn Bergenholtz

(former alias "Calalp")
Sweden
The name Merula subalaris 1887 author is Paul Leverkuhn. ...
Mark, do you mean it´s not, like in my notes; "Seebohm, 1887" ... as of here or here?

Seebohm 's OD here (PZS, 23 June 1887)

I think the paper Studien über einige südamerikanische Vögel nebst Beschreibung neuer Arten, by Leverkühn (and von Berlepsch), was pulished in 1890?
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Dusky Thrush

Yuanqiu Dong, Bo Li & Lizhi Zhou (2018) A new insight into the classification of dusky thrush complex: bearings on the phylogenetic relationships within the Turdidae, Mitochondrial DNA Part A, DOI: 10.1080/24701394.2018.1439026

Abstract:

Dusky thrush complex comprises of two sister species breeding in SC Siberia, which is the member of thrush Turdus from Turdidae. The phylogenetic resolution of Dusky thrush complex remains controversial, and a detailed research is still necessary. In this research, we determined the complete mtDNAs of both species, and estimated phylogenetic trees based on the mtDNA alignment of these and 21 other Turdidae species, to clarify the taxa status of the Dusky thrush complex. The squenced lengths of these three mitochondrial genomes were 16,737, 16,788 and 16,750 bp. The mtDNAs are circular molecules, containing the 37 typical genes, with an identical gene order and arrangement as those of other Turdidae. The ATG and TAA, respectively, are observed the most commonly start and stop codon. Most of the tRNA could be folded into the canonical cloverleaf secondary structure except for tRNASer (AGY) and tRNALeu (CUN), which lose ‘DHU’ arm. The control region presented a higher A + T content than the average value for the whole mitogenome. The phylogenetic trees reconstructed by the concatenated nucleotide sequences of mtDNA genes (Cyt b, ND2 and COI) indicate the Dusky thrush complex cannot be divided into two species, but the relationships between Dusky thrush subspecies still need additional study. This study improves our understanding of mitogenomic structure and evolution of the Dusky thrush complex, which can provide further insights into our understanding of phylogeny and taxonomy in Turdidae.
 

Frenchy

Well-known member
Yuanqiu Dong, Bo Li & Lizhi Zhou (2018) A new insight into the classification of dusky thrush complex: bearings on the phylogenetic relationships within the Turdidae, Mitochondrial DNA Part A, DOI: 10.1080/24701394.2018.1439026

Abstract:

Dusky thrush complex comprises of two sister species breeding in SC Siberia, which is the member of thrush Turdus from Turdidae. The phylogenetic resolution of Dusky thrush complex remains controversial, and a detailed research is still necessary. In this research, we determined the complete mtDNAs of both species, and estimated phylogenetic trees based on the mtDNA alignment of these and 21 other Turdidae species, to clarify the taxa status of the Dusky thrush complex. The squenced lengths of these three mitochondrial genomes were 16,737, 16,788 and 16,750 bp. The mtDNAs are circular molecules, containing the 37 typical genes, with an identical gene order and arrangement as those of other Turdidae. The ATG and TAA, respectively, are observed the most commonly start and stop codon. Most of the tRNA could be folded into the canonical cloverleaf secondary structure except for tRNASer (AGY) and tRNALeu (CUN), which lose ‘DHU’ arm. The control region presented a higher A + T content than the average value for the whole mitogenome. The phylogenetic trees reconstructed by the concatenated nucleotide sequences of mtDNA genes (Cyt b, ND2 and COI) indicate the Dusky thrush complex cannot be divided into two species, but the relationships between Dusky thrush subspecies still need additional study. This study improves our understanding of mitogenomic structure and evolution of the Dusky thrush complex, which can provide further insights into our understanding of phylogeny and taxonomy in Turdidae.

I read that as meaning Dusky and Naumann's should be lumped. Is that correct?
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
The results are also supported by the neighbour-joining tree which constructed based on protein-coding genes Cyt b, ND2 and COI genes (Figure 2). The NJ tree supports that Turdus eunomus and the intermediate have closer genetic relationship than Turdus naumanni, but the Dusky thrush complex probably cannot divided into two species. We suggest that Turdus eunomus and Turdus naumanni should be treated as two subspecies that is Turdus naumanni naumanni and Turdus naumanni eunomus.

:)
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
The results are also supported by the neighbour-joining tree which constructed based on protein-coding genes Cyt b, ND2 and COI genes (Figure 2). The NJ tree supports that Turdus eunomus and the intermediate have closer genetic relationship than Turdus naumanni, but the Dusky thrush complex probably cannot divided into two species. We suggest that Turdus eunomus and Turdus naumanni should be treated as two subspecies that is Turdus naumanni naumanni and Turdus naumanni eunomus.

So too strong conclusions from a relatively weak dataset? You would never get a species split based on only mitochondrial DNA, so why should you get lumping from only that?

Niels
 

Mike Earp

UK Birder
United Kingdom
I'm intrigued by the ''Turdus intermediate"

They don't seem to give any characterisation of the single intermediate specimen they studied (which seems to have been collected at the same time and place as the single specimens of Turdus naumanni and T. eunomus from which samples were taken). It's presumably intermediate between those forms but they don't give any indication of its morphology so it's not clear how similar it is to either of its presumed parents or how they were identified.
 

johnallcock

Well-known member
So too strong conclusions from a relatively weak dataset? You would never get a species split based on only mitochondrial DNA, so why should you get lumping from only that?

Niels

Isn't mtDNA the basis for commonly-accepted splits of e.g. Stejneger's Stonechat, Eastern Yellow Wagtail and Japanese/Cinereous Tit?
Meanwhile Two-barred Warbler is split despite sharing a mtDNA genome with obscuratus & trochiloides of Greenish (which viridanus does not share!)
 

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