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Turdidae (1 Viewer)

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
Interesting that the recommendation is "no" because of lack of published data

Niels
I dunno, seems like a really messy situation, with different folks placing it in different species and treating it as a unique species. Not surprising a no vote, in contrast to some other proposals. Although I say that with having zero experience with Dagua Thrush
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States

Paul Clapham

Well-known member
Canada
Interesting....I wasn't sure what was going to happen on the NACC/SACC end. If either committee rejects a proposal, does that mean it's sunk for inclusion in the new checklist? Or will discrepancies continue to exist?
Historically, both Clements/eBird and IOC have made decisions which differ from NACC's decisions (and maybe SACC's too but I can't recall any off the top of my head). So it wouldn't surprise me if the new committee does that too.
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
ebird/Clements have made only a very small number of decisions different from NACC, mostly concerning taxa that are largely old world.

But yes...IOC generally has more differences, including recognizing splits for several fairly well known North America birds. Although in recent years they have stuck to NACC/SACC more closely.
 

thomasdonegan

Former amateur ornithologist
Interesting that the recommendation is "no" because of lack of published data

Niels
Proposal (922) to SACC

Treat Turdus daguae as a separate species from Turdus assimilis

I have to say this is one of the more depressing proposals there has been for some time - SACC's inclination to promote historical taxonomies where possible (even if they do not make much sense), and BirdLife's reluctance to consider molecular data, conspire to strike down what must be a clearly good split (or two). There is of course a conflict between some of the vocal and molecular data, and the Amazonian population could do with more sampling - but I am not convinced that lumping everything is the best solution here.

Paul Coopmans first noted this split, which was picked up in Birds of Ecuador; he drew it to my attention in when we met around 1999/2000 or so, to plot fieldwork for the basis to describe Henicorhina negreti. Twenty years later, Dagua Thrush still not recognised, and the wait looks set to continue for some time!
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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