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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Tyrannides (1 Viewer)

Acanthis

Well-known member
G. Kohler's 2017 thesis (referred to in #75) includes the following new genera:
Inambariornis Cohn-Haft, Kohler, Aleixo, Brumfield & Ribas. Type: Hemitriccus spodiops (von Berlepsch, 1901).
Lanyonia Cohn-Haft, Kohler, Aleixo, Brumfield & Ribas. Type: Poecilotriccus senex (von Pelzeln, 1868).
Andinotriccus Kohler, Cohn-Haft, Aleixo, Brumfield & Ribas. Type: Hemitriccus granadensis (Hartlaub, 1843).
Bornscheinia Kohler, Cohn-Haft, Aleixo, Brumfield & Ribas. Type: Hemitriccus orbitatus (zu Wied, 1831).
Campina Cohn-Haft, Kohler, Aleixo, Brumfield & Ribas. Type: Hemitriccus inornatus (von Pelzeln, 1868).
Krotalotriccus Kohler, Cohn-Haft, Aleixo, Brumfield & Ribas. Type: Poecilotriccus capitalis (P. Sclater, 1857).
Physatriccus Kohler, Cohn-Haft, Aleixo, Brumfield & Ribas. Type: Poecilotriccus sylvia (Desmarest, 1806).
Here they are! Et voila!
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Thanks much Acanthis for the links. Somehow I hadn't yet seen John Boyd's trees, much easier to read than the Harvey tree.

Just looking over this, I had also missed the relocation of Fork-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant (furcatus) earlier - interesting.
 

Acanthis

Well-known member
The only name I use among these new genera is Campina for inornata and another that I forgot
To be fair to Kohler reading the thesis "Physa" refers to the onomatopoeic sound of a bladder emptying or bellows, and not as possibly implied in an earlier post, someone emptying their bladder :)

Here's the excerpt from the thesis.
Physatriccus Kohler, Cohn-Haft, Aleixo, Brumfield & Ribas gen. nov. Type species: Poecilotriccus sylvia (Desmarest, 1806) Included species: Physatriccus sylvia (Desmarest, 1806); Physatriccus plumbeiceps (Lafresnaye, 1846); Physatriccus russatus (Salvin & Godman, 1884); Physatriccus fumifrons (Hartlaub, 1853); Physatriccus latirostris (Pelzeln, 1868). Etymology: The masculine generic name is taken from the Greek suffix physa (onomatopoeic word which refers the sound of an emptying bladder) and trikkos (little bird) referring to the vocal pattern shared by the species in this group.
 

Acanthis

Well-known member
Thanks much Acanthis for the links. Somehow I hadn't yet seen John Boyd's trees, much easier to read than the Harvey tree.

Just looking over this, I had also missed the relocation of Fork-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant (furcatus) earlier - interesting.
Yeah, I don't know what other folks did to make Harvey's tree readable without the inevitable eye strain.
I just took a series of overlapping screenshots (~40) and printed them off.
These are now completely covered with scribblings and alterations, names and renames, and getting a little dog-eared.
Still finding gems though eg. yesterday, noticing the huge genetic distance between Acropternis orthonyx populations in Ecuador and Venezuela.
 
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pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Yeah, I don't know what other folks did to make Harvey's tree readable without the inevitable eye strain.
I just took a series of overlapping screenshots (~40) and printed them off.
These are now completely covered with scribblings and alterations, names and renames, and now getting a little dog-eared.
Still finding gems though eg. yesterday, noticing the huge genetic distance between Acropternis orthonyx populations in Ecuador and Venezuela.

I always just squinted a LOT and to be honest I posted here as I figured smarter folks than I would have info at the tips of their fingers rather than go back to squinting. Thank you again for that post, now I have figured out where to get John Boyd's trees throughout his site, very handy!

The Ocellated Tapaculo split I have seen mooted before - not surprising there is genetic evidence as well.
 

Acanthis

Well-known member
I always just squinted a LOT and to be honest I posted here as I figured smarter folks than I would have info at the tips of their fingers rather than go back to squinting. Thank you again for that post, now I have figured out where to get John Boyd's trees throughout his site, very handy!

The Ocellated Tapaculo split I have seen mooted before - not surprising there is genetic evidence as well.
Boyd's site is the best place to see cutting-edge bird taxonomic changes but be aware technically nothing is stable or set in stone. New research can result in him rapidly changing big pieces, as with the current review and rewriting of his suboscine pages. You can keep up to date here: Aves—A Taxonomy in Flux: Recent Changes
The TiF site has been quiet for a while. I suspect John has been immersed in other projects.
So there may be a whole load of other changes in the pipeline as he catches up. (y)
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
These are now completely covered with scribblings and alterations, names and renames.
Very little renaming for me but if I had to make proposals for future new genera, it would be these:

Phyllomyias griseocapilla = "Phyllotriccus"

Myrmotherula behni, schisticolor, minor and related species = "Myrmozetetes"

Drymophila squamata = Toenidiura if squamata is chosen to be its type species

Dysithamnus striaticeps and puncticeps = "Stictocorypha"

Philydor fuscipenne and erythrocercum = "Neophilydor
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Boyd's site is the best place to see cutting-edge bird taxonomic changes but be aware technically nothing is stable or set in stone. New research can result in him rapidly changing big pieces, as with the current review and rewriting of his suboscine pages. You can keep up to date here: Aves—A Taxonomy in Flux: Recent Changes
The TiF site has been quiet for a while. I suspect John has been immersed in other projects.
So there may be a whole load of other changes in the pipeline as he catches up. (y)

Aware of the flux part of it - I've used his site quite a bit and followed his changes in the past, just never managed to notice his trees! I have been glad to see his updates with his digestion of Harvey and other results lately!

Still curious what folks make of the possible stability / instability of Triccinae going forward.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Bemmels, Jordan B., Ashley C. Bramwell, Sean A. S. Anderson, Vanessa E. Luzuriaga-Aveiga, Else K. Mikkelsen, and Jason T. Weir. Geographic contact drives increased reproductive isolation in two cryptic Empidonax flycatchers [Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum Willow Flycatcher Empidonax traillii]. Molecular Ecology.
First published: 04 August 2021
https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.16105


Abstract
Geographic contact between sister lineages often occurs near the final stages of speciation, but its role in speciation's completion remains debated. Reproductive isolation may be essentially complete prior to secondary contact. Alternatively, costly interactions between partially reproductively isolated species – such as maladaptive hybridization or competition for resources – may select for divergence, increasing reproductive isolation and driving speciation toward completion. Here, we use coalescent demographic modelling and whole-genome datasets to show that a period of contact and elevated hybridization between sympatric eastern North American populations of two cryptic bird species preceded a major increase in reproductive isolation between these populations within the last ten thousand years. In contrast, substantial introgression continues to the present in a western contact zone where geographic overlap is much narrower and likely of more recent origin. In the sympatric eastern region where reproductive isolation has increased, it is not accompanied by character displacement in key morphometric traits, plumage colouration, or ecological traits. While the precise trait and underlying mechanism driving increased reproductive isolation remains unknown, we discuss several possibilities and outline avenues for future research. Overall, our results highlight how demographic models can reveal the geographic context in which reproductive isolation was completed, and demonstrate how contact can accelerate the final stages of speciation.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France

albertonykus

Well-known member
Mendonça, P., C. Dias, A. Aleixo, L.S. Carneiro, J. Araripe, and P.S. do Rêgo (2021)
Diversification across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec explains the phylogeographic arrangement of the widespread bright-rumped attila (Attila spadiceus; Tyrannidae) and reveals the existence of two major lineages
Journal of Ornithology (advance online publication)
doi: 10.1007/s10336-021-01928-3

We describe the phylogeographic structure of Attila spadiceus, a neotropical bird with 12 recognized subspecies, through the analysis for partial Cytb amplicon region obtained from 11 subspecies. The topology recovered from the analysis indicated the existence of two principal molecular lineages and that the morphological variation underlying the designation of subspecies is not reflected in the mitochondrial gene tree. Based on these findings, we infer that the diversification of A. spadiceus began at the Pleistocene (~ 1.5 Mya), with the Isthmus of Tehuantepec region as the main factor driving the formation of two molecular lineages, one to the west and the other one to the east of this geographic barrier.
 

Snapdragyn

Well-known member
Does anyone have access to this attila paper? I'm a little surprised there wasn't a break further south. I thought there were vocal differences either trans-/cis-Andean or across the Panama isthmus (I forget which).
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
Does anyone have access to this attila paper? I'm a little surprised there wasn't a break further south. I thought there were vocal differences either trans-/cis-Andean or across the Panama isthmus (I forget which).
by the description of the abstract, the paper is only based on a single partial mitochondrial gene. I would treat any conclusions with caution.
 

l_raty

laurent raty

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Rhynchocyclus cryptus, sp. nov.

Carlynne C. Simões, Pablo Vieira Cerqueira, Pedro Peloso, and Alexandre Aleixo. 2021. Integrative taxonomy of Flatbill Flycatchers (Tyrannidae) reveals a new species from the Amazonian lowlands. Zoologica Scripta. First published: 10 November 2021. https://doi.org/10.1111/zsc.12519

Abstract
Integrative taxonomic studies continue to reveal that many current polytypic species of birds are in fact constituted by two or more species and therefore have been central in uncovering ‘hidden’ or ‘cryptic’ biodiversity. The Olivaceous Flatbill (Aves: Tyrannidae: Rhynchocyclus olivaceus) currently has nine recognized subspecies distributed throughout the Neotropics, but so far, no complete phylogenetic hypothesis exists to test the validity and evolutionary relationships among them. To remedy this, we conducted a multi-character integrative taxonomic revision of the genus Rhynchocyclus, focusing on the polytypic R. olivaceus. The combination of a taxonomically dense sampled multilocus phylogeny (including three mitochondrial and two nuclear genes) with phenotypic analyses including morphological and vocal characters pointed to several taxonomic inconsistencies within R. olivaceus. The analyses strongly support that R. olivaceus is paraphyletic, with an exclusively cis-Andean clade (where the topotypic R. olivaceus is found) clustering as sister to Rhynchocyclus fulvipectus, to the exclusion of a clade grouping trans-Andean and western Amazonian populations currently placed in R. olivaceus—one of which is unnamed and fully diagnosable based on vocal and genetic characters. Consistent with the phylogenetic results, our vocal analyses identified at least four morphologically cryptic lineages within R. olivaceus that can be mutually diagnosed from each other by different loudsongs and call parameters. Therefore, we provide evidence for splitting these four groups into separate species, two of which are sympatric but not syntopic in western Amazonia, including an unnamed species described herein—Rhynchocyclus cryptus, sp. nov. urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:2DC17190-2BDD-49EC-88E6-4CF2FC2562A3.

English Name: Cryptic Flatbill
Portuguese Name: Bico-chato-críptico
 
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Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Rhynchocyclus cryptus, sp. nov.

Carlynne C. Simões, Pablo Vieira Cerqueira, Pedro Peloso, and Alexandre Aleixo. 2021. Integrative taxonomy of Flatbill Flycatchers (Tyrannidae) reveals a new species from the Amazonian lowlands. Zoologica Scripta. First published: 10 November 2021. https://doi.org/10.1111/zsc.12519

Abstract
Integrative taxonomic studies continue to reveal that many current polytypic species of birds are in fact constituted by two or more species and therefore have been central in uncovering ‘hidden’ or ‘cryptic’ biodiversity. The Olivaceous Flatbill (Aves: Tyrannidae: Rhynchocyclus olivaceus) currently has nine recognized subspecies distributed throughout the Neotropics, but so far, no complete phylogenetic hypothesis exists to test the validity and evolutionary relationships among them. To remedy this, we conducted a multi-character integrative taxonomic revision of the genus Rhynchocyclus, focusing on the polytypic R. olivaceus. The combination of a taxonomically dense sampled multilocus phylogeny (including three mitochondrial and two nuclear genes) with phenotypic analyses including morphological and vocal characters pointed to several taxonomic inconsistencies within R. olivaceus. The analyses strongly support that R. olivaceus is paraphyletic, with an exclusively cis-Andean clade (where the topotypic R. olivaceus is found) clustering as sister to Rhynchocyclus fulvipectus, to the exclusion of a clade grouping trans-Andean and western Amazonian populations currently placed in R. olivaceus—one of which is unnamed and fully diagnosable based on vocal and genetic characters. Consistent with the phylogenetic results, our vocal analyses identified at least four morphologically cryptic lineages within R. olivaceus that can be mutually diagnosed from each other by different loudsongs and call parameters. Therefore, we provide evidence for splitting these four groups into separate species, two of which are sympatric but not syntopic in western Amazonia, including an unnamed species described herein—Rhynchocyclus cryptus, sp. nov. urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:2DC17190-2BDD-49EC-88E6-4CF2FC2562A3.
French name : Bec-plat cryptique. But two subspecies are raised to species rank :
Rhynchocyclus aequatorialis : Bec-plat du Napo
Rhynchocyclus guianensis : Bec-plat du Guyana
 
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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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