• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

UK Various ID (1 Viewer)

Pete007

Well-known member
I would appreciate any help or feedback with the ID of the following all photographed in the UK.

1/ The spider I haven't a clue & I'm assuming the Damselfly to be a Common Blue or Azure ( also based on location) and not sure its possible to ID beyond this.
2/ I am leaning towards a male Meadow Grasshopper but it doesn't look an exact match to my book. The photo shows quite a distinct pale grey stripe on the top of the head and thorax not evident in my ID guide.
3/ Caterpillar - Looks like Burnet Moth and sticking my neck out Six-spot ?
4/ Meadow Grasshopper female ?

Many Thanks
 

Attachments

  • Holmbush Pond 26-7-14_M7A0510.jpg
    Holmbush Pond 26-7-14_M7A0510.jpg
    201.8 KB · Views: 28
  • Queensdown Warren_M7A6767.jpg
    Queensdown Warren_M7A6767.jpg
    214.3 KB · Views: 23
  • Hollingdean Park_M7A7044.jpg
    Hollingdean Park_M7A7044.jpg
    158.2 KB · Views: 8
  • Various_M7A7929.jpg
    Various_M7A7929.jpg
    189.3 KB · Views: 10

pdwinter

Paul Winter
You might want to take a second opinion but to me #2 is a female Rufous Grasshopper (it has clubbed antennae, shortish wings with a costal bulge and a strongly inflexed keel to the pronotum) - a much scarcer species than Meadow! - and you are right with #4 a female Meadow Grasshopper. Colour and patterns in grasshoppers are extremely variable - the only UK book that comes close to showing the wide variation is Evans and Edmonson.

Hope that helps.
 

Swindon Addick

Registered User
Supporter
Wales
It'll need a brave person to give you a firm id on the damselfly, but it looks to have solid blue on the 8th & 9th segments so if you can rule out the rare species on geography then I'll lean strongly towards Common Blue.
 

aeshna5

Well-known member
I'll pass on the damselfly as above, though if very recent Azure are largely over now as 99% of them emerge early in the season whereas Common Blue emerge throughout the season.

Agree with Rufous & Meadow Grasshoppers.

5-spot & 6-spot Burnet are indistinguishable in larval form so could be either. The former species tends to be restricted to calcareous sites & is much scarcer, whereas 6-spot is more generally found. As you've posted Rufous Grasshopper which also tends to be in calcareous habitats I'm guessing that could allow for 5-spot.
 

Pete007

Well-known member
Thanks for the info Paul , my ID guide which is Insects in general doesn't even illustrate Rufous Grasshopper. Meadow appeared the closest match but I was somewhat sceptical as the stripe on top of the head and thorax wasn't apparent as per photo.


You might want to take a second opinion but to me #2 is a female Rufous Grasshopper (it has clubbed antennae, shortish wings with a costal bulge and a strongly inflexed keel to the pronotum) - a much scarcer species than Meadow! - and you are right with #4 a female Meadow Grasshopper. Colour and patterns in grasshoppers are extremely variable - the only UK book that comes close to showing the wide variation is Evans and Edmonson.

Hope that helps.
 

Pete007

Well-known member
Many Thanks, the Damselfly ID is asking a lot I know but Common Blue would be very likely. The Burnet Moth was photographed at Hollingdean Park near Brighton so in reality could possibly be either 5/6 spot.
The Spider still remains anonymous - lol
 

aeshna5

Well-known member
Many Thanks, the Damselfly ID is asking a lot I know but Common Blue would be very likely. The Burnet Moth was photographed at Hollingdean Park near Brighton so in reality could possibly be either 5/6 spot.
The Spider still remains anonymous - lol

Didn't realise you were after the spider ID- thought you were just asking about the unfortunate damselfly!

Think it may be Larinioides cornutus. If I'm wrong salticus will probably say so!
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top