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Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

Untangle my mind please! (1 Viewer)

L.Taylor

Member
Cyprus
Hi guys thanks for the responses to clear up glass wearing I am mildly short-sighted and do sometimes use contacts. Someone I know has said they are prepared to sell their old Swarovski EL 10X42 for 800 pound, its on the upper end of the budget but I hear nothing but good things about the EL range so presume that this is a decent deal?
 

Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
If I was in his shoes, I would use the best tools for the job.......and if I was asked to ID birds, I would use the bins that delivered the highest resolution. So, in MY opinion, that would not be a handheld, non-IS bin.
Then why not the Canon 10x42?

It has a 10x magnification, enough distance for most people who wear glasses, a large FOV and enough EP to see something even in the twilight, and better optics, only the size, weight and price are a bit annoying, but that was also a bit higher with your options.

Andreas
 

Maljunulo

Well-known member
Hi guys thanks for the responses to clear up glass wearing I am mildly short-sighted and do sometimes use contacts. Someone I know has said they are prepared to sell their old Swarovski EL 10X42 for 800 pound, its on the upper end of the budget but I hear nothing but good things about the EL range so presume that this is a decent deal?
If you are only “mildly short-sighted” and you have no significant astigmatism, why not use the binocular without your glasses?
 

Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
I guess its just the habit of keeping them on to look for movement as i am walking the transects, no real reason when I am stopping
This is exactly why many eyeglass wearers want to keep their glasses on, not changing glasses can be precious time missing a bird.

Andreas
 

Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
Cost ...... This is getting close to double his budget.
No idea, here in Germany the 10x42 don't cost 1600,- pounds.
Also, that's exactly why I suggested the Conquest 10x42, the price would have been right.

Doesn't matter now, the questioner has now found a good binocular.

Andreas
 

Tringa45

Well-known member
Europe
Someone I know has said they are prepared to sell their old Swarovski EL 10X42 for 800 pound, its on the upper end of the budget but I hear nothing but good things about the EL range so presume that this is a decent deal?
Bear in mind that the original 10x42 EL had really miserable eye relief. This was the version with the black metal surfaces on the insides of the barrels.
The Swarovision and Field Pro ELs are a completely different optical design with flat field and excellent eye relief.
I have one of the earlier Swarovisions with 81 as the first two digits of the serial no. (2011 manufacture), so anything equal or higher could be recommended.

John
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
May I suggest Zeiss Conquest HD 8x32? For around £800 they give a sterling performance and since in Cyprus you have almost no twilight (doesn't it go from daylight to dark very quickly?) a 32mm would not disadvantage you. But the winning aspect of these binos is their fast focusing speed, about twice as fast as Zeiss's own SFs so you can focus onto a distant bird (egret/harrier/heron?) and then back to a nearby warbler and not miss anything by having to pump a slow-acting focusing wheel.

Good luck with your choice.

Lee
 

Dyrlege

Well-known member
Norway
May I suggest Zeiss Conquest HD 8x32? For around £800 they give a sterling performance and since in Cyprus you have almost no twilight (doesn't it go from daylight to dark very quickly?) a 32mm would not disadvantage you. But the winning aspect of these binos is their fast focusing speed, about twice as fast as Zeiss's own SFs so you can focus onto a distant bird (egret/harrier/heron?) and then back to a nearby warbler and not miss anything by having to pump a slow-acting focusing wheel.

Good luck with your choice.

Lee
I'd also have a look at the Swaro Habicht in 10x40 (it also comes in 8x): I prefer that to the Conquest HD (I have both). It is lighter, both in weight and view.
Just to complicate things😄
 

L.Taylor

Member
Cyprus
May I suggest Zeiss Conquest HD 8x32? For around £800 they give a sterling performance and since in Cyprus you have almost no twilight (doesn't it go from daylight to dark very quickly?) a 32mm would not disadvantage you. But the winning aspect of these binos is their fast focusing speed, about twice as fast as Zeiss's own SFs so you can focus onto a distant bird (egret/harrier/heron?) and then back to a nearby warbler and not miss anything by having to pump a slow-acting focusing wheel.

Good luck with your choice.

Lee
Thanks mate something to consider and yes its either light or dark here!
 

L.Taylor

Member
Cyprus
Bear in mind that the original 10x42 EL had really miserable eye relief. This was the version with the black metal surfaces on the insides of the barrels.
The Swarovision and Field Pro ELs are a completely different optical design with flat field and excellent eye relief.
I have one of the earlier Swarovisions with 81 as the first two digits of the serial no. (2011 manufacture), so anything equal or higher could be recommended.

John
Not something I have considered and it might be a deal breaker as i have committed yet.
 

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