Upton Warren (2 Viewers)

Duck_Pond

Professional Wildlife Photographer
Loads of grass snakes at UW - I photographed this one last year, at the North Moors. The band on the neck really stands out in some lights.
 

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midlands birder

Well-known member
uptons going through a bit of a purple patch at the moment.quite a lot of good stuff been reported,hope it carrys for a few more days.
MB
 

upstarts1979

Well-known member
A good evening at the Flashes The BHG roost was about 800, also 11 Common Tern. On the wader front more interesting with Black Tailed Godwit, 8 Snipe, 5 common Sands, Wood Sand (6th Day), and an obvious passage of Green Sands with 21 (mostly juveniles) constantly calling 4 flew off south this almost doubled the total of the previous day. Over the years this species used to reach mid 20's when many adults would have a partial wing moult these would then be joined by juveniles. However this year many of the adults have moved on so the majority of birds are Juveniles its a pity the adults didn't because we could have witnessed record numbers. Although its nice to know one species of wader has had a good breeding season.
The Teal are also increasing now at 40 (always worth looking for Garganey amongst the flock).
 

upstarts1979

Well-known member
Oh and I forgot to mention a small amount of passerine movement over the last couple of days included 2 Redstarts, 2 Spotted Flycatcher, and single Whinchat and yellow wag
cheers John
 

midlands birder

Well-known member
A good evening at the Flashes The BHG roost was about 800, also 11 Common Tern. On the wader front more interesting with Black Tailed Godwit, 8 Snipe, 5 common Sands, Wood Sand (6th Day), and an obvious passage of Green Sands with 21 (mostly juveniles) constantly calling 4 flew off south this almost doubled the total of the previous day. Over the years this species used to reach mid 20's when many adults would have a partial wing moult these would then be joined by juveniles. However this year many of the adults have moved on so the majority of birds are Juveniles its a pity the adults didn't because we could have witnessed record numbers. Although its nice to know one species of wader has had a good breeding season.
The Teal are also increasing now at 40 (always worth looking for Garganey amongst the flock).

Oh and I forgot to mention a small amount of passerine movement over the last couple of days included 2 Redstarts, 2 Spotted Flycatcher, and single Whinchat and yellow wag
cheers John

just what i was going on about john;),some very good birds there:t:,lets hope it continues for the weekend:t:
 

Duck_Pond

Professional Wildlife Photographer
Spotted crake at the Moors today. Seen from the West Hide initially, then later from the Water Rail hide. Hope it stays around for tomorrow - I know Kay would love to see it.

Going through my pics of it now.

Added one now - will add more to my gallery tomorrow.
 

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upstarts1979

Well-known member
Hi Duck Pond more wishful thinking.
But there are four records for the reserve
Sept 1981 at the north moors
oct 1994 at the sluice area at the moors after the area was cleared
july 1999 at the flashes to right of main hide
aug 2001 in front of the concrete hide again just days after it had been cleared

So anytime from August to October it is worth looking in the quiet reed fringed areas, preferably where there are no moorhens which always chase water rails let alone spotted crake. At the moment the best habitat is in front of the concrete hide (hopefully the kingfisher photographers will come across one) Hen Pool and the reeds around the 2nd Flash and also in front of the 1st Flash hide
Patience is the name of the game and mornings and evenings are best they are pretty rapid when moving in the open. Obvious pitfalls are juveniles water rail which always show a long bill as opposed to the short one of spotted crakes. You usually need several views to be 100% as above the colours are similar apart from white edging to coverts and scapulars. If you do see a water rail type bird with a yellowish short triangular bill make others aware no one will criticise you for that. More pairs of eyes makes it easier.
Good hunting
Cheers John

Hi Duck Pond
Nice pic. The story behind todays bird was two birders were unsure of its ID and told one of the regulars (Terry Norledge) who ID 'd it for them. It also appeared this evening in front of the concrete hide
cheers John
 

Duck_Pond

Professional Wildlife Photographer
Hi John

(It's Pete, btw) - We watched it initially from the West Hide, then someone called to say it was visible from the Water Rail (concrete) hide, so we all scuttled over there... but the light was poor.

I left just after 6pm when it was still pottering about on the fringe of the cut-back reeds.
 

upstarts1979

Well-known member
Now that the breeding season is almost finished apart from fresh moorhen and duck species, we can look at the success or otherwise. All the surveys are not yet complete but amongst the more conspicuous species the toals are as follows:-
Waders
Avocet - 10 adults were present 4 breeding pairs laid eggs but only one clutch hatched - (4 chicks) three of which fledged.
Redshank- 2 pairs one incubated for almost the full term but no chicks were seen. Lapwing - 4 pairs incubated two lots of chicks hatched BUT just one chick fledged
Oystercatcher - 2 pairs successfully raised 3 chicks between them
LRP - 4 pairs laid eggs and two clutches hatched but none fledged
Waders all over the country can have great breeding success one year then in the same habitat another year can comletely fail. At Upton this year predation of eggs was a factor. But Lapwing, Oystercatcher, Avocet and LRP all lost chicks
Gulls and Terns
Some would say that Black Headed Gulls are a nest predator But this year there was no evidence of this.
BHG - This species has only been breeding on the reserve for three years. This year the 2 colonies totalled 40 pairs wth many non-breeders in tow. They raised 45+ chicks.
The knock on effect of this increase in the BHG's is the increased protection for other species against both mammalian and avian predators. Common Tern have had the most benefit so much so that this year at least 7 pairs raised 12 chicks between them.
As and when the results come in I will inform you
cheers John
 

senatore

Well-known member
Spotted crake at the Moors today. Seen from the West Hide initially, then later from the Water Rail hide. Hope it stays around for tomorrow - I know Kay would love to see it.

Going through my pics of it now.

Added one now - will add more to my gallery tomorrow.

Well done Pete.

Max
 

StarainBoy

Well-known member
Avocet - 10 adults were present 4 breeding pairs laid eggs but only one clutch hatched - (4 chicks) three of which fledged.
Redshank- 2 pairs one incubated for almost the full term but no chicks were seen. Lapwing - 4 pairs incubated two lots of chicks hatched BUT just one chick fledged
Oystercatcher - 2 pairs successfully raised 3 chicks between them
LRP - 4 pairs laid eggs and two clutches hatched but none fledged
Waders all over the country can have great breeding success one year then in the same habitat another year can comletely fail. At Upton this year predation of eggs was a factor. But Lapwing, Oystercatcher, Avocet and LRP all lost chicks

Useful information (if a bit depressing). Thanks.
 

midlands birder

Well-known member
Spotted crake at the Moors today. Seen from the West Hide initially, then later from the Water Rail hide. Hope it stays around for tomorrow - I know Kay would love to see it.

Going through my pics of it now.

Added one now - will add more to my gallery tomorrow.

a little beauty wasent it,it was from the concret(spider) hide that me and my dad watched it from,it shown well for a bit but then dissapeared,i didnt get any photos as every time a locked onto the bird someone got in the way.i wouldlike tosk for a copy for memories and my blog(credited in your name) but is this asking too much.looks as if you left as i was there,were you the person that was coming out of the hide and a teenager asked if you had any good photos,if so that was me.this whole borrowing photos is becoming for to often for my liking.:smoke:
any way other birds seen were water rail(and at the flashes) the wood sand :t:was still there as was the black tailed godwit giving stunning views,42 curlew,9 snipe,10c green sand,4 common sand,800+ b h gull in the roost,400+ canadian geese over(and i mean at least,huge amounts toninght) and posibly better than the wood sand an adult 'not so' common gull,will add photos here later after ive uploaded them.
im suprised nobody has alredy mentioned this but what about that montys harrier that flew over the flashes:eek!:.as i said on friday,upton is going through a purple patch.
no sign of spotted crake today
MB
 
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upstarts1979

Well-known member
High MB
I don't mention any recent news as Worcester Birding is the news service for us all. But now you have mentioned it yes a very albeit brief bird on Saturday morning that was my 19th consecutive early start on a Saturday since April. Like the early bird catches the worm the early 'birder' catches the bird.
cheers John
 

midlands birder

Well-known member
High MB
I don't mention any recent news as Worcester Birding is the news service for us all. But now you have mentioned it yes a very albeit brief bird on Saturday morning that was my 19th consecutive early start on a Saturday since April. Like the early bird catches the worm the early 'birder' catches the bird.
cheers John

and the late birder catches the spotted crake;)
MB
SO was it you who saw it must have been an amazing bird.
i find it funny only a couple of weeks ago we were saying a spot crake could turn up and it did so,the water leval at the flashes looks good for a least sandpiper dont it.
pss.did you see the common gull
 

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