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Used Canon EF 300mm f4 L IS USM Lens (1 Viewer)

Jono L

Well-known member
I am thinking of trading in my Canon 100-400mm mk 1 for one of these.
Anybody think that is a good idea? Mostly for getting record shots of migrant birds in bushes and trees and the odd flyover bird. I am not a serious photographer, just want something relatively easy to use that will deliver decent results.

Cheers
Jono
 

Malcolm Stewart

Well-known member
Hi, you could save cash if you bought the non-IS version of the 300 F/4 L. I have one and it's sharp. OK perhaps you would miss the IS, but today's bodies normally offer higher ISOs than I've used in the past.
 

temmie

Well-known member
I have this lens since 2009. Actually, I had one until 2017 that was a beater in the end, and it got stolen.

I thought long and hard and decided I wouldn't have any benefit from any other lens that came on the market between 2009 and 2017, so I bought the same lens (second hand). I am still very pleased with the lens and maybe would even buy it again if I had to choose right now in 2020.

It's not the best/brightest/longest/lightest/cheapest lens but it has a very well-rounded set of characteristics. It still performs among the best in the right circumstances (bird close, good light), you can add length with a converter (so you'll have a stabilized 420mm F5.6, imho still more all-round and flexible than a (slightly sharper but non IS) 400mm F5.6), and because it's F4 and not F2.8, it won't break the bank or your back.

I took a shot of this Olive-backed pipit yesterday with a Canon 7D mark II, 300mm IS with 1.4 extender at F7.1 and 1/500. This is reduced in apple photos to 1000 pixels horizontally, but no other adjustments. Almost full-frame but slightly cropped for dramatic effect.
https://waarnemingen.be/media/photo/031/600/31600825.jpg

Just to show what the lens is capable off.
 

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
Thanks for sharing your experience with this combination. I had been debating whether to "upgrade" to one of the new Canon mirrorless bodies from the 7D mkii I am now using, but had seriously been considering trying the 300mm f/4 L IS instead. The biggest factor for me is the weight issue as I have been using a Sigma 150-600mm lens on the 7D and I swear that as I get older, it gets heavier. The one thing that had kept me from making the move was I was worried about how well it would perform with the 1.4 extender. I'll be back to the US in March, so I think I'll go ahead and save a lot of money by changing my everyday use to the 300mm and keeping the venerable and proven 7D.
 

nsclayton

Nick Clayton
I am thinking of trading in my Canon 100-400mm mk 1 for one of these.
Anybody think that is a good idea? Mostly for getting record shots of migrant birds in bushes and trees and the odd flyover bird. I am not a serious photographer, just want something relatively easy to use that will deliver decent results.

Cheers
Jono
Hi Jono L

I can't see what you would gain by making this trade. The 300mm is of similar size, weight and quality as the 100-400. The big plus for the 100-400 is the focal range gives it more flexibility. You could add a 1.4 extender to the 300mm and get 420mm f5.6 but this isn't much different from the 400mm f5.6 on the zoom lens, you would only have 300mm and 420mm rather than the full range between 100-400mm.

I owned the 300mm f4 for many years and took some nice photos mostly with the 1.4 extender fitted, but if I was to purchase one of these lenses now it would be the 100-400 for its flexibility.

I was wondering what your thought process is regarding this lens swap?
 

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
A major reason that I am seriously considering a fixed aperture is that I bird mostly where dust and very fine particulates are a real problem and hence I consistently have a real problem with the zoom lenses sucking in dust. Once it is on the inside of the lenses it cannot be cleaned away.
 

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