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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

UVHD+ appreciation ~ my, how I do (1 Viewer)

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
All three of the alpha binocular producers have well-earned the adulation and respect that they have received.

But I know that Leica seems to be at least "third fiddle" around here. They don't present the latest, most radical ideas in binocular design. They don't get much press, nor much forum enthusiasm. But I've discovered that none of that matters. Leica produce, today, some of the finest binoculars money can buy. I'm talking about the tried, true, and well time-tested Ultravid HD plus line of binoculars.

My idea for this thread is just to give a little tribute to a brand that may seem a little "under the radar" of some of today's binocular enthusiasts. As I compare UVHD+ binoculars to some of the popular Zeiss SF and Swarovski EL and NL offerings, I'm thrilled to say that the UVHD+ binoculars are truly spectacular - in razor sharpness, beautiful color quality, rich saturation, snappy contrast, and rock-solid build quality. And, they are priced quite reasonably, comparatively speaking.

I have just two Leica UVHD+ binoculars at present (have also briefly had two others), but I love and respect them as much as (or more than) my five Zeiss and two Swarovski bins. Here's a bravo to Leica!

UVHD+ 10x32 and 7x42 - two of the finest binoculars you can buy!
51361852001_6aba804e40_b.jpg


In time, I will pass these down to younger generations, and I'm sure that they will be just as amazed as I am at the fine quality, incredible views, and high performance that they offer. They are family heirlooms!
 
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NZbinodude

Well-known member
Well said! Nobody does 'no frills' and 'elegant' the way Leica does.

I'm still waiting for my 7x42 HD+ to arrive. Should be another few weeks. Thanks for giving me that final 'nudge'!! ;)
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
ZD, I think we're singing from the same hymn sheet here.

Leica glass is not about numerical superlatives; it's about magic.
Leica made Noctivid to roll with the trendy, but they are so smart to stick with Ultravid HD-Plus. Can't beat the feel in the hand, the razor sharp clarity, color quality, contrast, stunning build quality! The Leica "view" is so delicious. Pure class in glass.
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
Well said! Nobody does 'no frills' and 'elegant' the way Leica does.

I'm still waiting for my 7x42 HD+ to arrive. Should be another few weeks. Thanks for giving me that final 'nudge'!! ;)
Sorry the wait is so long for you, NZ. But, it will be worth the wait. Others have termed the 7x42 "relaxing" and I couldn't agree more. After a time, the 10x view can feel somewhat intense, at which time switching to 7x42 really does feel relaxing - without giving up a nicely magnified view.

When holding an Ultravid, any Ultravid, in the hands, the feeling of fine quality just exudes.
 

casscade

Well-known member
Today’s so called advances seem to be primarily based on flat fields while pincushion is considered a fault by many current reviewers, even though it’s clearly there on purpose to negate the rolling ball effect.

The biggest advantage or so called innovation from today best for me is the increased fov in the NL’s and to some extent in the SF’s, otherwise not a much has changed imo.

The 10x50 Leica UV for example has had a big apparent fov for decades, starting with the 10x50ba/bn up until today with the UV’s. That decades old design is almost identical to the modern Zeiss 10x42 SF.

If Leica could keep the image of the current 7x42 with say a 69-70 apparent fov it would be the best view ever made imo. I’ve searched 2 decades for a better view than the 7x Leica and have finally given up, for me it doesn’t exist.

Yes there are flatter views and bigger apparent views but none better, few are even approaching. The 7x Leica offers a view only my naked eye can produce but with less magnification, a magnificent masterpiece imo.
 

_Prism_

Well-known member
England
Today’s so called advances seem to be primarily based on flat fields while pincushion is considered a fault by many current reviewers, even though it’s clearly there on purpose to negate the rolling ball effect.

The biggest advantage or so called innovation from today best for me is the increased fov in the NL’s and to some extent in the SF’s, otherwise not a much has changed imo.

The 10x50 Leica UV for example has had a big apparent fov for decades, starting with the 10x50ba/bn up until today with the UV’s. That decades old design is almost identical to the modern Zeiss 10x42 SF.

If Leica could keep the image of the current 7x42 with say a 69-70 apparent fov it would be the best view ever made imo. I’ve searched 2 decades for a better view than the 7x Leica and have finally given up, for me it doesn’t exist.

Yes there are flatter views and bigger apparent views but none better, few are even approaching. The 7x Leica offers a view only my naked eye can produce but with less magnification, a magnificent masterpiece imo.
Casscade field flatteners and wide FOV eyepieces are not really innovations as they have been around for ages in the astronomy community. Wider FOV's in binoculars are a feature that most of us can appreciate (like getting that coveted 7x view in an 8x or 10x magnification), and so are a worthy inclusion to binoculars. As far as field flatteners go - just a guess here - but I imagine they have more to do with people using their binoculars as a telephoto lens than anything else. An edge-to-edge flat field is not really necessary for birding, but it's a different story if you're taking photographs. Now that virtually everyone is carrying around a powerful camera in their pocket, it makes sense that the major brands would head in this direction (as is evidenced with Swarovski's phone mount, for example). For the casual photographer, your 8x or 10x binocular can do double duty now, essentially functioning a bit like an expensive telephoto lens in addition to its primary duties - an appealing proposition for sure.
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
I often begin a long birding day with a 10X50 and end with the UV 7X42. It is one truly fine binocular.
The 7x42 UVHD+ is especially nice for closer-in and wooded birding environments. I have a continual parade of birds across my feeders (up to six feeders) from dawn to dusk, placed 50 feet from my patio. At that distance, the 7x42 is fantastic. Plenty of magnification to enjoy the birds and take in all six feeders within the field of view. I can always grab up a 10x, if I want a very close-up view.

7x42s are perfect for hummingbird feeders, at 14', as well.

And, after using 10x for a time, it's nice to step back to 7x, as well, for the relaxing view it provides. :)
 
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tenex

reality-based
An edge-to-edge flat field is not really necessary for birding, but it's a different story if you're taking photographs. Now that virtually everyone is carrying around a powerful camera in their pocket, it makes sense that the major brands would head in this direction (as is evidenced with Swarovski's phone mount, for example). For the casual photographer, your 8x or 10x binocular can do double duty now, essentially functioning a bit like an expensive telephoto lens in addition to its primary duties - an appealing proposition for sure.
This sounds to me rather clumsy and difficult to hold steady, even at the modest magnification of a typical 8x bin. I've never seen anyone doing it, have you? What I do see is phones on scopes (on tripods), and otherwise APS-C or smaller zoom cameras with IS. This doesn't seem a significant factor in the flat-field trend.
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
This sounds to me rather clumsy and difficult to hold steady, even at the modest magnification of a typical 8x bin. I've never seen anyone doing it, have you? What I do see is phones on scopes (on tripods), and otherwise APS-C or smaller zoom cameras with IS. This doesn't seem a significant factor in the flat-field trend.

Indeed. If you would like a high quality, sharp image, photographing through binoculars, they would need to be on a tripod or similarly stable position. In fact, a lot of folks have a hard time holding just a camera (or phone) steady enough for a very sharp image. :oops: Hand holding binoculars, with a cell phone held up to the ocular, is not an easy task to do well! Very ample light and a high shutter speed can help, of course.
 
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_Prism_

Well-known member
England
This sounds to me rather clumsy and difficult to hold steady, even at the modest magnification of a typical 8x bin. I've never seen anyone doing it, have you? What I do see is phones on scopes (on tripods), and otherwise APS-C or smaller zoom cameras with IS. This doesn't seem a significant factor in the flat-field trend.
Very clumsy, and full of shake (spoken from experience)! But yes, have done it several times (see the cropped bunny shot taken through a Ultravid 8x20, below) and seeing others do it more and more. Was clued into this when I overheard store salespeople advising other customers where they can find a suitable phone mount for their Zeiss bins etc.
Ideally one would use a tripod or something stable, but sometimes inspiration strikes when you're out on a hike and you just have to make do with what you have!
 

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Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
The 7x42 UVHD+ is especially nice for closer-in and wooded birding environments.
Hi,

lately I was on a mountain with the UVHD+ 7x42 and was able to look about 80-100 kilometers into the distance, the picture in the Leica was just beautiful, the low magnification didn't bother me at all, I had no desire for "more" ...
The UV 7x42 is really a pearl, a wonderful binocular.;)

Andreas
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
Hi,

lately I was on a mountain with the UVHD+ 7x42 and was able to look about 80-100 kilometers into the distance, the picture in the Leica was just beautiful, the low magnification didn't bother me at all, I had no desire for "more" ...
The UV 7x42 is really a pearl, a wonderful binocular.;)

Andreas
I agree, Andreas. 7x is a significant amount of magnification over naked eyes! And when you add in 42mm objectives, and Leica UVHD+ glass... well, aren't we blessed to have such magnificent "looking glasses" in our hands! 🦅
 

42za

Well-known member
I have a Leica UVHD+ in 10 x 32 and agree that it is a superb binocular.
I also have a old Zeiss Night Owl in 7 x 45.
I alternate between the two and cannot really choose between them , they are both extremely good.
Both Binoculars are engineering masterpieces.
My opinion anyway.
 

quincy88

Well-known member
I own a pair of 7x42 Ultravids, and they are my favorite pair of 42s.
I think a reason that this forum is a bit quieter than Swarovski's or Zeiss' is that Swarovski and Zeiss seem to come out with new models or configurations more often than Leica does. I could be wrong on that, but it seems that way.
I also own two Leica microscopes, which are both wonderful. I have an 8-35x dissecting scope and a 40x,100x,400x,1000x compound. Since we are celebrating Leica binoculars, I figured I would also cheer Leica microscopes.
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
I own a pair of 7x42 Ultravids, and they are my favorite pair of 42s.
I think a reason that this forum is a bit quieter than Swarovski's or Zeiss' is that Swarovski and Zeiss seem to come out with new models or configurations more often than Leica does. I could be wrong on that, but it seems that way.
I also own two Leica microscopes, which are both wonderful. I have an 8-35x dissecting scope and a 40x,100x,400x,1000x compound. Since we are celebrating Leica binoculars, I figured I would also cheer Leica microscopes.
quincy... yes. Leica is not as assertive with products in the binocular market. Thus, in the world of media... not Leica is not as prominent. That said... they produce superlative glass!
 

CSG

Well-known member
United States
I would love, love, love to have the opportunity to look through these binoculars. You can see what I own in my signature but I think I could be very happy with just a pair of these. I don't get how the trend has seemingly moved to 10x bins with their narrower FOV and difficulty holding as steady as 8x. My only 10x are Canon IS (great for astronomy) and the little Zeiss Victory 10x25's which I bought during my time as a SAR volunteer).
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
I would love, love, love to have the opportunity to look through these binoculars. You can see what I own in my signature but I think I could be very happy with just a pair of these. I don't get how the trend has seemingly moved to 10x bins with their narrower FOV and difficulty holding as steady as 8x. My only 10x are Canon IS (great for astronomy) and the little Zeiss Victory 10x25's which I bought during my time as a SAR volunteer).
I understand the preference for 7x and 8x. They certainly are easier to hold steadily and thus, are the most popular. 10x can be held fairly steadily by some, not so much by others. And, viewing situation matters, too. I do a LOT of viewing out to my acreage from the comfort of a recliner. I can rest my elbows on the arms of the recliner and gain much increased steadiness with the 10s.

Sometimes I prefer the more relaxed view offered by 7x and 8x. And sometimes I want to get higher magnification.

In my use, 7s are great, 8s are great, and 10s are great.
 

CSG

Well-known member
United States
I understand the preference for 7x and 8x. They certainly are easier to hold steadily and thus, are the most popular. 10x can be held fairly steadily by some, not so much by others. And, viewing situation matters, too. I do a LOT of viewing out to my acreage from the comfort of a recliner. I can rest my elbows on the arms of the recliner and gain much increased steadiness with the 10s.

Sometimes I prefer the more relaxed view offered by 7x and 8x. And sometimes I want to get higher magnification.

In my use, 7s are great, 8s are great, and 10s are great.
I've got all three magnifications too (although the Jason Empires I bought back in my college days for astronomy are pretty junky all things considered. I was just hoping someone from Leica saw my message and wanted to send me a pair of the 7x42's for, um, a review. Yeah, that's the ticket! ;)
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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