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Victory Pocket Creation Interview (1 Viewer)

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
With over 74,000 visits the thread starting with the Victory Pocket Review has been very popular so I sought out a Zeiss Technician to ask about the creation of the Pockets. The Technician is Tammo Sebastian Leuken, from the north of Germany.

Troubador: Tammo, thank you for participating in this interview about the Victory Pocket binoculars, which have been well received by many Birdforum members. Would you kindly give us some background to their development?

Tammo: It would be a pleasure. The project started at trade shows and other events and by personal contact, where we listened to what our customers tell us about what they like, what they don’t like, and the kind of binoculars they wish for. Many of those customers said they wanted a lightweight, compact pair of binoculars, but with optics as good as full-sized instruments. Some of these customers were birders who wanted a bino for situations where they didn’t want to carry full-sized instruments, for many, many different reasons. Other customers were out-doors people such as hikers, cyclists or kayakers, and still others enjoyed watching different sports. We gradually developed an understanding of their needs and implemented their wishes as far as technically feasible, and this created the Victory Pockets.

Troubador: You have continued with the unusual asymmetrical design seen on the previous Victory Compacts.

Tammo: Yes, because a significant number of customers mentioned they had problems handling small binoculars with two hinges. The asymmetrical design makes handling far easier and not so different from full-sized binoculars. This means that those who normally use full-sized binoculars adjust to them quickly and easily, and newcomers to binoculars don’t find anything strange or clumsy about them.

Troubador: But doesn’t this design mean that the Pockets do not fold as small as a double hinge bino?

Tammo: If your only target is to fit the bino into the smallest possible pocket then, ultimately yes, this is true, but we were guided by what our customers wanted and they clearly said they wanted fuss-free handling as well as a compact size. This made sense to us because when you are trying to focus on a new bird or on an important point in a game of golf, or baseball or cricket, the last thing you want is for the binoculars to fold-up in your hands when you start to turn the focus wheel. As well, some of these customers already have things in their hands while enjoying their outdoor activities, and so sometimes want to use their binoculars with one hand only. These include hikers with walking poles, kayakers and canoeists with their oar, and even cyclists with a water or energy drink bottle in one hand when they stop cycling, and the binoculars in the other. Even folks watching sports events and who might have one hand holding a sandwich or umbrella, want to be able to securely use these binoculars with the other hand. All of these people were very clear, they don’t want the binoculars folding-up when they are using them. So we are happy with the balance we achieved between compactness and easy, reliable handling, but the best way for Birdforum members to find out if this suits them is to try them out and decide for themselves.

Troubador: The Victory Compacts were made at the Zeiss factory in Hungary but this is not the case with the Pockets. Why is that?

Tammo: Correct. This is simply because we have other plans for our production capacity in Germany and Hungary, so it made sense to use the skills and capabilities of one of our several trusted partners worldwide to bring our design to the market with the right quality, and at the right price. We are very pleased with our design which delivers what we believe is the best-in-class field of view, excellent colour fidelity, image definition and contrast. Naturally we have been delighted to see the response has been so favourable among Birdforum members.

Troubador: You mentioned just now that this product is being made to the right quality levels, but since it is being produced by your partner, how do you ensure that this is so?

Tammo: Firstly, this capability to achieve the Zeiss quality level was fully established before the product reached the market, secondly, now that it is in production, it, like all Zeiss binoculars, undergoes extensive inspections at our in-house test lab in Oberkochen, Germany, according to Zeiss quality assurance protocols.

Troubador: Tammo, thank you once again for taking the time to give us this background to the Victory Pockets.

Lee
 

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast
United States
I'd be interested in learning more about the thinking behind the design. They seem like such a conventional binocular in most respects but their performance is out of this world. What breakthroughs underlie that accomplishment? One peculiarity, at least in my experience, is that the optical assemblies of the right and left halves of the bin are the same, rather than "mirrored" in nature (e.g. notice the orientation of the roof prism) as in every other bin I've examined. I imagine that reduces production costs, perhaps allowing for more attention to precision of assembly?

--AP
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
I'd be interested in learning more about the thinking behind the design. They seem like such a conventional binocular in most respects but their performance is out of this world. What breakthroughs underlie that accomplishment? One peculiarity, at least in my experience, is that the optical assemblies of the right and left halves of the bin are the same, rather than "mirrored" in nature (e.g. notice the orientation of the roof prism) as in every other bin I've examined. I imagine that reduces production costs, perhaps allowing for more attention to precision of assembly?

--AP

Tammo replied with:

Alexis,
Thank you for your questions and for your enthusiasm for the Victory Pockets which have been well received by the market. We are sure you would not expect us to explain in detail to our competitors how the quality and price of the Victory Pockets has been achieved, so we can only answer in this way. We wanted to achieve a step upwards from the former Victory Compact but with SF we had, in our opinion, raised the bar significantly. As a result we had to work hard to develop a compact binocular with the level of performance that could sit comfortably in the ‘Victory’ range alongside SF. This was the challenge to our design team and we did not release the Victory Pocket for production until this challenge was satisfied.

Tammo​


Lee
 

eronald

Well-known member
Here is my list of minor suggested improvements for the next version. I will supply details if contacted directly.

- Adjust coatings for warmer less greenish renderings
- Revise diopter for finer adjustability, marks, lock.
- Revise eyecups for longer extension or supply optional alternates.
- Poll users re often stated desire for more compact case and then change case
- Change strap to less fiddly less bulky and more discrete version eg cord with clamps
- Supply simple wriststrap
- Provide pocket objective and ocular protections at this price level

While the Pocket is best in class, all of the above are minor irritations which various contributors to the forum have remarked on.
Edmund
 
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tenex

reality-based
- Poll users re often stated desire for more compact case and then change case
I'm just curious, does the present case allow maintaining set IPD when the bino is stored? (Should remember that but don't.) That would be the only reason to keep it.
 

mwhogue

Registered User
Supporter
I'm just curious, does the present case allow maintaining set IPD when the bino is stored? (Should remember that but don't.) That would be the only reason to keep it.

No the only way to fit them in the included case is set to max IPD. That's unfortunate because the case is high quality and well designed otherwise. The case is Ok for transportation and longer term storage as it's a semi rigid.

Mike
 

eronald

Well-known member
No the only way to fit them in the included case is set to max IPD. That's unfortunate because the case is high quality and well designed otherwise. The case is Ok for transportation and longer term storage as it's a semi rigid.

Mike

The case is not optimal for transportation of an especially compact binocular as it is huge and if used consumes limited space inside a daypack or shoulderbag.

If I buy the most expensive miniature instrument on the planet rather than a decent larger glass, I want small volume. Hint: this binocular is called “Pocket”. The case does not fit in any of my pockets.

I’m not saying the case is defective, I’m saying it is not appropriate.

These very minor issues have been discussed to death, IMHO Zeiss should say “thank you for your suggestions”, do a poll on what users here and hunters and urban users would like, and implement the results.


Edmund
 
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Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
The case is not optimal for transportation of an especially compact binocular as it is huge and if used consumes limited space inside a daypack or shoulderbag.

If I buy the most expensive miniature instrument on the planet rather than a decent larger glass, I want small volume. Hint: this binocular is called “Pocket”. The case does not fit in any of my pockets.

I’m not saying the case is defective, I’m saying it is not appropriate.

These very minor issues have been discussed to death, IMHO Zeiss should say “thank you for your suggestions”, do a poll on what users here and hunters and urban users would like, and implement the results.


Edmund

Edmund
My interpretation of MWHogue's use of the word 'transportation' was for situations such as en route to your birding or holiday destination rather than out for a walk with the case in a backpack. Hence 'transportation and storage', and this is how I have used it.

Lee
 

eronald

Well-known member
Edmund
My interpretation of MWHogue's use of the word 'transportation' was for situations such as en route to your birding or holiday destination rather than out for a walk with the case in a backpack. Hence 'transportation and storage', and this is how I have used it.

Lee

Lee,

We agree on the term “transportation”. I know this does not anymore refer to a one way boat trip to Australia but implies usual stowed travel for a possession. I just took a trip to Portugal (Estoril) and the Pocket went along transported “naked” in a pocket of the shoulderbag that was my only luggage for a short trip. There was no room for the bulky case. At my advanced age luggage is minimal. Which is why I am very appreciative that I can buy an instrument as small and light and sharp as the Pocket.

The Pocket performed very well by the way, allowing me to look at scenery, and a couple of seabirds, ships at sea, and even what looked like some genuine parrots with orange beaks that seem to have established themselves in the palm trees below the Casino Estoril.

Btw I still own a couple of Cabin Trunks, designed to stand on end with hangers for suits, that were used on my first trip by ship to Lisbon with my parents, loaded onboard together with my mother’s indispensable hatboxes by porters, and festooned with labels according to the secret codes of Hotel Concierges- the ample travel luggage of the olden days of dressing formally for dinner at the Captain’s table. Alas, today I have to breathe out to fit my obese frame between my seat and the seat tray in front, and my luggage has to be lifted into an equally restricted spot in an overhead rack, and everything has to be dragged to and off the plane by the shrivelled legs that are said to exist somewhere unseen below my spherical belly, while my nine year old makes his presence known on his own childhood trip to Lisbon.


Edmund

PS
There is probably one useful function present in the large Zeiss case: If sand gets on the instrument, when wearing the case looped to one’s belt , the sand will probably fall to the bottom and out of the case rather than polish the lenses.

PPS I have been careful to list mostly issues that pertain to marketing/packaging/accessories and are bought in. Even eyecups are third-party items, and having a supplier engrave a few position marks on the diopter wheel won’t kill Zeiss. I am not suggesting were any design errors, manufacturing shortcuts, or that this is not an alpha product.
 
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Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Lee,

We agree on the term “transportation”. I know this does not anymore refer to a one way boat trip to Australia but implies usual stowed travel for a possession. I just took a trip to Portugal (Estoril) and the Pocket went along transported “naked” in a pocket of the shoulderbag that was my only luggage for a short trip. There was no room for the bulky case. At my advanced age luggage is minimal. Which is why I am very appreciative that I can buy an instrument as small and light and sharp as the Pocket.

The Pocket performed very well by the way, allowing me to look at scenery, and a couple of seabirds, ships at sea, and even what looked like some genuine parrots with orange beaks that seem to have established themselves in the palm trees below the Casino Estoril.

Btw I still own a couple of Cabin Trunks, designed to stand on end with hangers for suits, that were used on my first trip by ship to Lisbon with my parents, loaded onboard together with my mother’s indispensable hatboxes by porters, and festooned with labels according to the secret codes of Hotel Concierges- the ample travel luggage of the olden days of dressing formally for dinner at the Captain’s table. Alas, today I have to breathe out to fit my obese frame between my seat and the seat tray in front, and my luggage has to be lifted into an equally restricted spot in an overhead rack, and everything has to be dragged to and off the plane by the shrivelled legs that are said to exist somewhere unseen below my spherical belly, while my nine year old makes his presence known on his own childhood trip to Lisbon.


Edmund

PS
There is probably one useful function present in the large Zeiss case: If sand gets on the instrument, when wearing the case looped to one’s belt , the sand will probably fall to the bottom and out of the case rather than polish the lenses.

PPS I have been careful to list mostly issues that pertain to marketing/packaging/accessories and are bought in. Even eyecups are third-party items, and having a supplier engrave a few position marks on the diopter wheel won’t kill Zeiss. I am not suggesting were any design errors, manufacturing shortcuts, or that this is not an alpha product.



D'accord.

Lee
 

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