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Vintage and Classic Film Cameras (1 Viewer)

Bird_Bill

Well-known member
I used Olympus SLRs for taking photos in the mountains from the 1980s until the mid 2000s. I had an OM1 and later an OM2n. After many years of abuse in fairly tough environments both finally died and were disposed of in favour of DSLRs.

In 2004 I bought a Nikonos V for using when seakayaking. I only actually used it for a couple of years before going digital, using the Canon Powershot series in underwater housings designed for diving. I still have the Nikonos for odd sentimental reasons. Occasionally I get it out and have a mess about with it. I like the very simple and chunky controls but I would never want to go back to film again. I don't find that using digital cameras makes me lazy.

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Hi Andreadawn
splendid shot of the jellyfish!
Your film kit chronology is noteworthy of technology that brought nature to millions by the photographs made with them.
OM!...it set off a race by other makers to try and catch up

For folks not familiar with the Nikonos...Perhaps the most unique 35mm film system ever made. Fully submersible. It will go deeper than most of us can without leaking.

I do not mean to imply digital is unworthy.
Digital technology has made better photographers of us all. It has allowed us to focus even more on the world around us.


Nowadays, my bag has a digital and a film body, that interchangeably swaps lenses.

Had my digital body been on my lens instead of film, I would had gotten more of this muskrat last week, as it swam by, its face hidden by the leaves on a cottonwood branch it was carrying.
On kodak UltraMax 400...grain starting to show
 

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42za

Well-known member
Hello All,

Nice photo's being posted.

I am not really a "serious" photographer , but I do enjoy photography a lot.

I also use both Film and Digital , but my digital Camera is only an old Canon Powershot G12.

I prefer Film photography as I have a few camera's (but no long lenses) and I really enjoy the "ritual" and relatively slow process of film.
I also enjoy using vintage and classic old style camera's , the "feel" of these old , well built machines cannot be equalled or beaten by the modern digital camera.

I will grant however that for speed , "instant gratification" and cost , digital is cheaper and much more convenient.

Long live Film o:D.

Cheers.
 

lmans66

Out Birding....
Supporter
United States
Hello All,

Nice photo's being posted.

I am not really a "serious" photographer , but I do enjoy photography a lot.

I also use both Film and Digital , but my digital Camera is only an old Canon Powershot G12.

I prefer Film photography as I have a few camera's (but no long lenses) and I really enjoy the "ritual" and relatively slow process of film.
I also enjoy using vintage and classic old style camera's , the "feel" of these old , well built machines cannot be equalled or beaten by the modern digital camera.

I will grant however that for speed , "instant gratification" and cost , digital is cheaper and much more convenient.

Long live Film o:D.

Cheers.
Challenge yourself and try digiscoping with your G12. Even though digital, the scope slows a person down and the skill needed to obtain a photo using digiscoping is more akin to shooting with film than shooting with a huge lens/ camera...just a thought, jim
 

42za

Well-known member
Challenge yourself and try digiscoping with your G12. Even though digital, the scope slows a person down and the skill needed to obtain a photo using digiscoping is more akin to shooting with film than shooting with a huge lens/ camera...just a thought, jim

hello Imans66,

Thanks for the thought.

I would like to try digiscoping but I do not have a telescope and at present my discretionary funds will not stretch to buying one , (good worthwhile ones cost a lot).

I will just have to make do with what I have.

|=)| |=)|

Cheers.
 

Bird_Bill

Well-known member
Winter has turned to spring, and the house is slowly self heating to a temperature too unpredictable for black/white film and its processing.

Arista Edu Ultra 100 and 200 are economical black/white films that do a splendid job.
I'm able to semi stand process using kodak HC-110.
Dilution ratio of 1/167, developer to water.
15 seconds of initial agitaion, let stand for 25 minutes, one inversion and another 25 minute stand. At 20c, 68f

imperturbable eagle on Arista Edu 100 last Dec.
LX body and pentax A 70 to 200 f/4 zoom
 

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42za

Well-known member
Hello Bird_Bill,

Nice photo of the Eagle.

I do not develop my own film at present as I have access to a good laborotary , perhaps I should re-think as I have all the equipment available to develop B&W film LOL.

Cheers.
 

sbarnhardt

Traveling man
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Hi Patudo!
Cheers! and thank you.



Using the same 400mm f/5.6 and LX as in the black bird shot
Caught this buck chasing his harem of does last fall.
Used aperture priority and f/8, focused close to infinity.
it threw me a shutter speed of 1/1000 on kodak gold 200
At hyperfocal that's what shows.

The second shot, using the same 400mm on an autofocus body using the catch in focus function. I tweaked the focus helicoid as the geese came into me, the shutter released on focus confirmation. On kodak gold 200 also.

Third shot, again using the focus trap with the autofocus body, and a manual focus 600mm ED f/5.6. On kodak portra 400...I like that film a lot.

Your "film" conversation caught my eye and then your pictures, especially that first one. Where is that?

Getting back to the film part of this. What do you do for processing, etc.? I've been thinking about resurrecting my old film set up with an Olympus OM10. I have a bit better chance with that, since I have zoom and wide angle lenses than I do with my present digital. Can't really justify the coast of a new digital should I want to go that route.
 

Bird_Bill

Well-known member
Your "film" conversation caught my eye and then your pictures, especially that first one. Where is that?

Getting back to the film part of this. What do you do for processing, etc.? I've been thinking about resurrecting my old film set up with an Olympus OM10. I have a bit better chance with that, since I have zoom and wide angle lenses than I do with my present digital. Can't really justify the coast of a new digital should I want to go that route.

Hi s'
Pardon me for the delay
Rusty blackbird and the deer after that were at the Harlo island section of the middle Miss. river wildlife refuge system..(NWR)
Spent more time under flood water than not, since then.

I've home processed B/W and color for years
Use a jobo CPE 2 for color, both C-41 and E6, negs, and slides respectively.
Nowadays, that's cost prohibitive for most folks

For color especially, temperature control is job one
Recently, I've read about folks using immersion cookers for precise temperature control.

here's an example

Think its possible to get into the above set up for less than $200.
Including kodak flexicolor C-41 chemicals
The volume that chap shows would last me a year.
Stored in glass containers and topped off with dust off spray, the chems will last that long.

I stand process black and white, its fairly simple.
Shooting and processing black and white is far simpler and cheaper.
Can jump into a B/W processing kit, with developing tank with film reels, plus other odds and ends for about $50
 

sbarnhardt

Traveling man
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Still holding on to my OM10 and Accessories

I got into a short camera discussion with another BF member a day or two ago and made the comment to him about where to send film for processing.

A day, give or take, passed and he passed along a link to a thread on here on BF where I might could ask that question. Well I looked and guess what, it was one I posted in back in the summer.

Long and short, I'm still holding onto the camera and accessories and still looking for a good recommendation of where to send it for processing.

Any thoughts?
 

Bird_Bill

Well-known member
Any thoughts?

Hi Barney!

Walgreens and CVS still have drop off color film and color slide developing,

Couple caveats....
Negatives are not returned

Turn around time is roughly 3 to 5 days for Walgreens,
and 2 to 3 weeks for CVS.

Some photographic stores maintain a drop off processing service.

If you're close to a university or college, a chance exist to scrape up something..

There are mail in labs, that can be found and vetted online.
I've never used one.

Good luck!
Cheers!
 

Sterngucker

Râ’¶dneck
I have a Canon AT-1 and also a pristine Rolleicord from my birth year. Both get used at intervals. Needless to say the Rollei is more fun.
 

iveljay

Well-known member
Still got the Leica, probably shot on OM4Ti with 50mm 3.5 macro, which regrettably I don't still own.
 

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iveljay

Well-known member
First slr - Practica Vf - instant return mirror for first time in Practica and auto aperture closing and opening, removable back and rapid underbody leverwind.
Once used to deflect a wine bottle thrown at me and worked perfectly afterwards - excellent beast, though a bit big compared to later models. Lever wind a bit too rapid - would rip a film totally out of cassette if used carelessly for final shots. 1/500 maximum shutter speed.
 

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etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
First slr - Practica Vf - instant return mirror for first time in Practica and auto aperture closing and opening, removable back and rapid underbody leverwind.
Once used to deflect a wine bottle thrown at me and worked perfectly afterwards - excellent beast, though a bit big compared to later models. Lever wind a bit too rapid - would rip a film totally out of cassette if used carelessly for final shots. 1/500 maximum shutter speed.
And not a mark on the Practica! They were evidently built tough.
 

iveljay

Well-known member
Actually that pic was taken before the bottle incident, there was a slight dent in the top of the pentaprism housing, however it had no effect at all on its operation. It was solid, simple and utterly reliable. The Nova that came after it was smaller, lighter and unfortunately not as reliable.

Much later I had an Exacta V, the shutter release was operated by your left hand. It was used in a lot of labs as it had masses of accessories, its only weak point as far as I was concerned was that the delayed action and slow shutter speed mechanics were on the other side of the camera to the shutter release mechanism and needed a mechanical linkage that could suffer from lack of maintenance. I simply disconnected mine as most cameras of that era were relatively simple to dismantle and repair with simple light engineering and watchmakers tools.

The Practica Vf continued in use with an assortment of lenses until replaced by my first OM1, a quantum leap in every department!
 
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