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Vintage Binoculars (2 Viewers)

ffpmme

New member
Sorry about taking so long to respond. Yes they seam clear I have cleaned the out the best I could. Any ideas where to find a screw or eye cups? I paid about 15 USD for them


Attached is the picture I missed of the 8x30 ranger on the right side.

Thank you for you help
 

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Binastro

Well-known member
Hi,
The screw, probably in a repairers parts bin.

The eyecups would cost more than the binocular.
Some people here make rubber ones out of old bicycle tyre inner tubes.
I presume that they were removed because of short eye relief or the user's wearing glasses.

$20 or $15 is about right.
 
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Nixterdemus

Well-known member
Here is an alleged ad from 1908 Sears catalogue. One of me favs the Busch Terlux 12x35 of which I own. Not from 1908 more like middle-late 20's. There are two testimonials from 1906 on the Busch Terlux line. According to a website I ran across $55 in 1908 is valued 110 yrs later at $1506.75.

Click on the ad to super size.

1908-sears-catalog-ad-busch-terlux.html


The objective lenses of the Busch Terlux Prism Binocular are one and three-eighths inches in diameter, almost twice the diameter of any other prism binocular binocular glass made, and as the illumination increases in proportion to the square this means that the Busch Terlux Prism Binocular glass admits almost four times the volume of light that is admitted by any other binocular glass made. Used by Wellman Polar Expedition.

$1 in 1908 is 27.40 in 2018. $55 is $1506.75

Bodies and crossbar are made from one solid casting, of an especailly hard alloy of aluminum, to secure the greatest possible solidity and rigidity, thus insuring permanent alignment, with the least possible weight. The working parts are brass, the bodies are covered with very finest black pebbled morocco leather and all exposed metal parts are finished in fine, bright. black enamel, highly polished. FOV 180' at 1k yds weight 21 oz, 7" high 4.5" wide.
There is no glass more highly corrected for spherical and chromatic aberration.

Little wonder why I as a moth was drawn to the Busch Terlux flame.

If those sold for 55 clams how much would me 15x44.5 Terlux have snagged? I note keeping in line w/almost 3mm EP as the 12x.
-----
From the 1906 Wellman polar expedition a pic. Note the July 1906 calender on the wall. As well two binocular leather carrying cases. The longer one on the right looks as my 15x Terlux. The 15x & 12x being very close in dimensions.

https://airandspace.si.edu/sites/de...n-objects/record-images/NASM-NASM-9A10698.jpg

National Air and Space Museum - Smithsonian Institution
Walter and Arthur Wellman Collection 1894-1934

Here's an interesting read:
https://www.airships.net/first-attempt-fly-atlantic-wellman-vaniman-airship-america/
 
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Nixterdemus

Well-known member
Dang, wish BF would allow longer editing as it would save another post. In perusing over the 1934 Dumaurier catalogue I note Busch Terlux offerings in 24, 18, 15 & 10x. The 15x, that I own, is listed as 52.5m/m objective lens, Light Transmitting Power of 12.25, Fiels of 59.5 yds, Height 8 7/8", weight 37 1/16 oz No 6070 black leather $138. The lens might be 52.5mm in diameter. But the locking collar only allows 1.8125"/46mm. A 15x46.

Considering inflation $138 in 1934 equals a 2018 price of $2,595.62.

10x 46.5m/m or 1 3/8" according to the Sears 1908 ad for the 12x. The 10 & 12x probably share the same objective size. Or they started w/12x and by 1934 it was replaced w/10x. I guess that since the 12x isn't mentioned in the 1934 catalogue that perhaps it was discontinued by Busch in attempt to streamline their offerings. Maybe DuMaurier didn't think the 12x was enough of a jump from 10x or to 15x.

The Terlux dates back to the early 1900's somewhere around 1906-1909. Early models did not have lugs in first bridge for neckstrap. They had metal tabs rivited into the leather covering the barrels. There's four interesting tidbits about me 10x44.5, claimed 46.5mm Terlux previous post mistakenly called it a 12x, that I own. 56/64/74 reference points for IPD settings on a tapered brass cover that also sports Germany in quaint script/font.

The metal eyecups have brass covers w/2 tiny brass set screws c-c 3/16". The covers are cone shaped about 3/16" concave/towards the ocular w/3/8" round opening in the center. As a metal splash guard/ocular protector. Actually the collar is brass & the concave cone is of ferous metal. Two piece the cone is placed over the eyecups then the brass collar locks them down.

The leather is smooth instead of pebblegrain.

Behind the first bridge is a brass wheel checkered style, 3 rows raised diamond tips, on the edge for firm grip. Two arrows pointing opposite directions w/2 sets of 4 smaller close together mini arrows inbetween. An 'L' on the left a 'F' on the right. Lose for loose und fest for tight? Anywho it is a fancy locking IPD wheel.

Lastly the ultimate in post purchase advertising. Remember purchasing an auto only to have the dealership name in chrome bolted to the boot? Whilst the left prism cover states:

Busch Terlux
Prisma Binocle
10X

Right side:
Paul A Meyrowitz
Fifth Avenue 36th Street
New York

These were some fancy bins w/add on brass eyepiece protectors, the brass IPD lock, perhaps bling w/store name on right prism cover and I note that a bin w/SN 10,000 later the tapered brass ipd degree indicator did not have special font/script that spelled Germany. Since I've never seen another w/brass IPD locking wheel. I figured that Paul A Meyrowitz, who was an optician, perhaps had a run of these special ordered.

https://books.google.com/books?id=c...a Meyrowitz Fifth Avenue 36th Street&f=false ---scroll down to bottom of page.
The Literary Digest, Volume 40, Part 2
Ad in the 1910 literary Digest April 30 bottom of Pg 900:
ASTRONOMY with the TERLUX
_________________________
(busch prism binocular)

A booklet for Beginners
By
Kelvin McKready
A new and interesting
story of the night sky as
revealed by the Terlux

Call or write for illustrated Booklet, mentioning Dept. C
Paul A. Meyrowitz, Optician
389 Fifth Avemue, Cor. 36th St., New York

http://www.binoculars-cinecollectors.com/html/body_german.html
according to this site, "Terlux first list in Busch catalogue 1908 as Dr Hans Seeger states in second book." Terlux 12x35 ca 1914 No 74497 & 18x46 sn 84414 ca 1925-30.

http://www.fernglasmuseum.at/museum/busch_terlux_12mal/busch_terlux_12x.html
According to this site, "From 1906 - 1935 the optical company Busch produced the very successful model "Terlux. The Terlux came in different variants 6, 9, 10, 12, 15, 18 and 24 times magnification. " They have on display a 12x35 w/serial number 79407.

The 10x had four sections the 12x had three & was shorter.

If you have a Terlux post the magnification and SN.
 
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Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello Nixterdermus,


Occasionally, the point of sale engraving adds value to a collectible. In the case of your Terlux, Meyrowitz, Optician, is a shop I recall well, although near 43rd Street but still on Fifth Avenue, but on the west side of the avenue. It was an optician which sold other optical devices as well. There may be another Meyrowitz optician in Paris.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur Pinewood :hi:
 

drdrayton

New member
Hartman 8x30

I just bought another Hartmann Polerim, an 8x40 this time,superb optics yet again, I already have an 7x35 which is wonderful to use and a 6x30, both excellent, I am always impressed by Hartmann optics, considering they were pretty much a budget binocular of their time, far cheaper than Zeiss, Leica etc, but able to compare very favorably with the best. I would so love to get one of the compact series 7x35 or a bernina 7x50 or 8x60.

Just picked up a perfect Hartmann 8x30 Binoculars
Simply pin sharp! Do you know anywhere I can find more information on these?
Optics & condition are perfect & came with the original leather case.
Hartmann Wetzlar 117 Made in Germany - Bernina 8x30 Weitwinkel
Serial # 78760



I would certainly appreciate it...
Devin Drayton
[email protected]
 

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angelo225544

Well-known member
As I write this, there is an FPO 7x35 Bushnell RangeMaster on an auction site with a buy-it-now price of $1995. This binocular is in pretty rough shape, and has at least one cracked prism. I recently purchased a 7x35 Kowa Prominar, manufactured at about the same time (pre “jb” codes... perhaps circa 1959?). I also own an FPO 7x50 Bushnell Bino-Foto binocular from about the same year (best as I can determine). Each of these binoculars was purchased within the past year, on that same auction site, in absolutely pristine condition (I’m a 65 year old retired professional photographer - my standards are high), for $100 apiece. I have spent a lot of time behind both of these flawless vintage binoculars, as well as hundreds of examples of modern optics. They were worth every penny I spent on them, and I can highly recommend them to others. However, to anyone reading this post, and wondering whether the performance of ANY binocular made circa 1960, is in any way commensurate to the above mentioned binoculars’ $2000 price, I am here to suggest it is not! This is not to suggest their price may not be fully justified to a collector (after all, there are $2000 baseball cards). But, I also feel a certain obligation to those who will rely on the opinions expressed here, to offer this caveat.
 

angelo225544

Well-known member
Just picked up a perfect Hartmann 8x30 Binoculars
Simply pin sharp! Do you know anywhere I can find more information on these?
Optics & condition are perfect & came with the original leather case.
Hartmann Wetzlar 117 Made in Germany - Bernina 8x30 Weitwinkel
Serial # 78760



I would certainly appreciate it...
Devin Drayton
[email protected]

I have a Hartmann 8x30 Porlerim Weitwinkel (Essentially, Wide Angle). Mine is badly fogged, so it will be visiting Mr. Suddarth sometime soon. It is my understanding that the Bernina is a newer model, with lens coatings. I don’t know whether the glass or construction was changed, but the Porlerim is exceptionally well constructed internally.
 

jring

Well-known member
I have a Hartmann 8x30 Porlerim Weitwinkel (Essentially, Wide Angle). Mine is badly fogged, so it will be visiting Mr. Suddarth sometime soon. It is my understanding that the Bernina is a newer model, with lens coatings. I don’t know whether the glass or construction was changed, but the Porlerim is exceptionally well constructed internally.

Hi,

Hartmann bins are certainly nice - they gave the Zeiss and Leitz management bad dreams in their time... but unfortunately business side seems to have been less competent as they were struggling in the 80s and closed shop in '92.

The Bernina and Porlerim series were built concurrently with Bernina being the upmarket option (there also was a third series called Compact Weitwinkel in between at times).

I have got a very nice Bernina 8x60 (sic!) for cheap but there is some brownish haze on some prism surfaces - I hope it is just dirt and not degenerating Canada Balsam used to cement the prisms.

They have a dual coating and were leading in transmission back in the 60s or 70s.

See this nice writep by Gijs von Ginkel on Hartmann bins https://www.ja2-gmbh.de/files/Ja2/P...nen/hartmann_porlerim_ginkel_2010_history.pdf for some history. Is it also available on House of Outdoors pages?

Joachim
 

Gijs van Ginkel

Well-known member
For those who are interested in the history of and the binoculars produced by Hartmann, Wetzlar and how the binoculars of that company perform as compared to other producers: look at the WEB-site of House of Outdoor under VERREKIJKERS and than VERREKIJKERS TESTEN EN VERGELIJKEN. I have posted there a number of tests (sometimes also mentioned on BF) and Powerpoints and one of these powerpoints is about Hartmann, Wetzlar.
Gijs van Ginkel
 

Brad_mustafa

New member
Good morning everyone,

I recently obtained binoculars and was looking for some help on potentially identifying the age of them. They are labeled at “Ernst Abbe” with “Jena” underneath Ernst Abbe. On the other side shows the magnification “P8x30.” Also shows the serial number “2619695.” From the little research I did I was able to find that Ernst Abbe was born 23 January 1840 and was a physicist. Also Abbe was a professor at the University of Jena.

Any information would be appreciated.

https://i.postimg.cc/gxDqhDTD/63039-...-E83-CA290.jpg

https://i.postimg.cc/f3qc2bZS/76-BC4...5842293-AA.jpg

https://i.postimg.cc/67pVfZsN/9-E305...-F7342-A96.jpg

https://i.postimg.cc/dhvjDX43/CFB65-...20-DA99204.jpg
 

jring

Well-known member
Hi,

here's the corrected link:

https://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=189055&referrerid=31246

Regarding Ernst Abbe - he was indeed a physicist, but more importantly he was an early employee (and later partner) of Carl Zeiss and was responsible for many of the groundbreaking optical designs which made Carl Zeiss Jena famous.

His name on this pair of bins probably should imply that this is some kind of Zeiss instrument - but this can't be true.
If the serial number was correct, this pair would date from 1912, a time when Zeiss did not produce an 8x30 pair.

http://www.europa.com/~telscope/zeissbin.txt

http://home.europa.com/~telscope/zeissbn2.txt

I'd guess this pair is of soviet or russian origin... probably KOMZ.

Joachim
 

Brad_mustafa

New member
Thank you very much for the information. It is interesting that I have not been able to find others online with the Ernst Abbe logo. Every other Jena binoculars have zeiss' name. A friend of mine just gave them to me- and apparently they belonged to her deceased husband and were passed down from his father - who was born in the late1800s.

Once again, thank you.

- Brad
 

Binastro

Well-known member
The markings are odd.

The p may be a Ro.

8x3o seems odd also.
I would expect 8x30.

There are skilled Polish fakes, so it may be one of these with a Soviet original binocular.
The condition looks good.
I don't recognise the case either.

B.
 
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