Warbler, Pennsylvania, October 20 (1 Viewer)

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Agree not Orange-crowned; not sure what to make of it though - doesn't look quite right for Mourning despite the strong legs and large bill, nor Yellow either.
 

tom baxter

Well-known member
Pale legs and long blunt tipped beak, tail length and what can be seen of under tail color rules out Wilson’s Warbler, looks like A pretty normal Yellow Warbler in my opinion.
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
Pale legs and long blunt tipped beak, tail length and what can be seen of under tail color rules out Wilson’s Warbler, looks like A pretty normal Yellow Warbler in my opinion.

Reluctantly I think that gets my vote. Suggest bill colour wrong for morning warbler: my first thought was yellowthoat but it doesn't have a markedly different (more yellow) throat
 

KenM

Well-known member
Pale legs and long blunt tipped beak, tail length and what can be seen of under tail color rules out Wilson’s Warbler, looks like A pretty normal Yellow Warbler in my opinion.

I don’t believe Yellow Warblers come with flesh coloured bills?

Cheers
 

jmepler

It's just a flesh wound.
And now the link in the op post leads to nothing :C

Niels

Apparently the eBird checklist has been updated. The bird in question has been changed to Mourning Warbler. That was the consensus in local discussions.

Here is a link to the eBird checklist.
 

njlarsen

Well-known member
Opus Editor
Well, I looked again and I have grave difficulty seeing a yellow warbler in the image. Maybe it could be a Mourning W.

Niels
 

birdmeister

Well-known member
United States
Mourning is my best guess, too. With such extensive yellow below (and face as well as proportions wrong for Yellow in my opinion), that seems the best fit.
 

tom baxter

Well-known member
I am in the opposite camp, I can’t see mourning warbler. It doesn’t have any gray tones at all. The legs and bill do look wrong for yellow warbler, initially I admittedly looked past this on purpose because it looks wrong for anything else and I wrote it off as being a developing juvenile. In hindsight this was a bad call and not a good approach to the discussion. I don’t know what it is but do not see Mourning Warbler, not to say it isn’t one.
 
Last edited:

Larry Sweetland

Formerly 'Larry Wheatland'
I am in the opposite camp, I can’t see mourning warbler. It doesn’t have any gray tones at all. The legs and bill do look wrong for yellow warbler, initially I admittedly looked past this on purpose because it looks wrong for anything else and I wrote it off as being a developing juvenile. In hindsight this was a bad call and not a good approach to the discussion. I don’t know what it is but do not see Mourning Warbler, not to say it isn’t one.
I can't see the image any more, but as I recall the lighting effect on the head looked really washed out, leaving it only possible to guess what the plumage on the head really looks like. It could easily be greyer in real life. Other features like the shape of the bill, leg colour etc looked more reliably captured I think.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Scotland
I am in the opposite camp, I can’t see mourning warbler. It doesn’t have any gray tones at all. The legs and bill do look wrong for yellow warbler, initially I admittedly looked past this on purpose because it looks wrong for anything else and I wrote it off as being a developing juvenile. In hindsight this was a bad call and not a good approach to the discussion. I don’t know what it is but do not see Mourning Warbler, not to say it isn’t one.

See the picture of an immature female Mourning Warbler here. I think it looks very similar, allowing for the different light conditions:
https://nemesisbird.com/birding/bird-sightings/a-phenomenal-day-of-banding/
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top