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Warbler - Thailand Khao Yai NP (1 Viewer)

petit-robert

Well-known member
Hello
I photographed this warbler on November 17 in Khao Yai NP, northeast of Bangkok.
I'm thinking of a Phylloscopus claudiae - Claudia's Leaf Warbler but I have serious doubts. I await your opinions. Sincerely, Robert
 

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petit-robert

Well-known member
Yes unfortunately only one image. As for behavior, nothing special to say about it. The bird fed like any other warbler but this one made no sound unlike the yellow-browed warbler for exemple.

Thank you for your interest.
 

HouseCrow

Well-known member
What was the doubt? I would think it is the expected suspect. There is no similar species likely to venture to Thailand from further afield is there? (sure, anything can happen but...)
Eastern Crowned is more yellow and never as contrasty (grey-necked/headed) like this one.

Hope to learn, as I have still little viewing experience with East Asian Leaf Warblers.
cheers,
Gerben
 

Grahame Walbridge

Well-known member
What was the doubt? I would think it is the expected suspect. There is no similar species likely to venture to Thailand from further afield is there? (sure, anything can happen but...)
Eastern Crowned is more yellow and never as contrasty (grey-necked/headed) like this one.

Hope to learn, as I have still little viewing experience with East Asian Leaf Warblers.
cheers,
Gerben
Oh it were so simple Gerben!

Claudia's is the widely assumed default at lower elevations in winter at Khao Yai NP, as is the case over of much of Thailand i.e away from the south. Davison's (ssp. intensior) occurs as a resident above 1,200m https://ebird.org/checklist/S246951...93.1173165618.1668933788-596365005.1668933788 but the situation has been further complicated by the recent discovery of wintering Hartert's (presumably fokiensis) at 1,200m see https://ebird.org/checklist/S820538...59.1173165618.1668933788-596365005.1668933788

Separation of Claudia's and Hartert's, in particular fokiensis is problematic, not only are the differences in morphology very slight, but they share the same behavioural traits. The KY birds were confirmed by vocalisation otherwise, it would necessitate trapping a bird and obtaining a feather sample for DNA assay. Davison's could be readily excluded if you had a clear view of the underside of the tail-see link above.

Now, looking at the OP, the apparent absence of yellow to the supercilium and face are perhaps more suggestive of Claudia's which, would be the most likely option below 1,000m.

Grahame
 

Grahame Walbridge

Well-known member
Is this wrongly ID'd then Grahame, a few of these which are lebelled as Claudis's, have some yellow in the super?

I said they are morphologically very similar and Claudia's can show traces of yellow to supercilium and face but the intensity is less on average compared to Hartert's. Consequently, I have not identified the OP with certainty.

Regarding the headline image from Hegurajima, Japan on eBird which, I assume you are referring to, the bird has very reduced yellow to its supercilium (in fresh plumage) which would lead one to suspect Claudia's. As I do not know the full circumstances surrounding this record I will refrain from further comment. We do not know the outcome of this record https://ebird.org/checklist/S51618006 but it would not surprise me to learn it failed to make the grade for a National 1st since both Claudia's and Hartert's are potential vagrants.

Grahame
 
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petit-robert

Well-known member
Hello, Thank you for all these instructive exchanges. So we can think that it is Claudia's Leaf Warbler even if a little doubt persists? Anyway, thank you for your answers,
Robert
 

johnallcock

Well-known member
Oh it were so simple Gerben!

Claudia's is the widely assumed default at lower elevations in winter at Khao Yai NP, as is the case over of much of Thailand i.e away from the south. Davison's (ssp. intensior) occurs as a resident above 1,200m https://ebird.org/checklist/S246951...93.1173165618.1668933788-596365005.1668933788 but the situation has been further complicated by the recent discovery of wintering Hartert's (presumably fokiensis) at 1,200m see https://ebird.org/checklist/S820538...59.1173165618.1668933788-596365005.1668933788

Separation of Claudia's and Hartert's, in particular fokiensis is problematic, not only are the differences in morphology very slight, but they share the same behavioural traits. The KY birds were confirmed by vocalisation otherwise, it would necessitate trapping a bird and obtaining a feather sample for DNA assay. Davison's could be readily excluded if you had a clear view of the underside of the tail-see link above.

Now, looking at the OP, the apparent absence of yellow to the supercilium and face are perhaps more suggestive of Claudia's which, would be the most likely option below 1,000m.

Grahame

What about Emei Leaf Warbler? Has that been recorded in Thailand? And is it considered a potential visitor? The wintering range seems very poorly understood so far - we've had a few records now in Hong Kong (ID'ed by song) but it's tricky to separate from reguloides/claudiae/fokiensis and potentially overlooked away from breeding grounds.
 

Grahame Walbridge

Well-known member
What about Emei Leaf Warbler? Has that been recorded in Thailand? And is it considered a potential visitor? The wintering range seems very poorly understood so far - we've had a few records now in Hong Kong (ID'ed by song) but it's tricky to separate from reguloides/claudiae/fokiensis and potentially overlooked away from breeding grounds.
Very pertinent questions John. No records currently, and yes, it's surely considered a potential winterer.

Grahame
 

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