• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

What did you see in your binoculars today? (9 Viewers)

I just saw something exciting this morning - Mourning Cloak butterfly on a white pine trunk, looked beautiful in the 7x42 EDG, my trusty yard binocular. Apparently they're known to come out in winter on warm days, which is exactly what we're having now:

 
This last Sunday at a mud flat about an hour away, saw:

3-4 black-eared kites,
2 mallards,
20+ eurasian oystercatchers,
lots of common shelducks,
1 osprey,
6 warbling white-eyes,
2 bull-headed shrikes,
lots of eurasian wigeons,
5 northern pintails,
lots of eurasian teals,
2 great cormorants,
lots of eastern spot-billed ducks,
1 greater scaup,
2 japanese tits,
lots of rock doves,
2 gray herons,
1 little egret

Was my first dedicated birding day since starting this hobby (didn't buy my binoculars for birding but got into it recently when I randomly ran into a beautiful male kingfisher). Other days were just doing other things and happening to have binoculars around.
 
At the weekend with my 30x70 binos at WWT Slimbridge. Huge numbers of lapwing, golden plover, knot, geese, widgeon, teal, some crane and many more. Amazing place! My Nikon 8x30E2 got little use as they were narrow in comparison. Very windy, so I am asking Santa for a better tripod.

Peter
 
I continued my twice-per-year tradition of taking my Nikon 7x35E-C's into the forest outside the tire shop in coastal New Hampshire while my snow tires are being put on or removed. It usually turns into an hour or two of birding.

Gorgeous day today, pure blue sky and temps right around freezing. It was quieter than April but I enjoyed tracking down a bunch of the winter regulars. Had to listen to most of the birds up in the high canopy of white pines. Tufted Titmouse and Chickadees were the dominant players in every part of the forest. Also saw dark-eyed junco, blue jays, crows, red-tail hawk roaming around the woods. Couple of mourning doves basking in the sun. The star of the day was a very loud pilieated woodpecker.

very relaxing and enjoyable as usual. I ended up studying some of the regulars like a pair of Titmouse for extended periods instead of trying to find more species...they're beautiful! Also learned that the brushy areas around the streambeds are the best place to find birds in a conifer forest like this.
 
Titmice are funny.

We used to watch them tuck seeds away in wreaths that we hung on a railing outside.

I don’t know if they ever came back to get any of those seeds.
 
Titmice are funny.

We used to watch them tuck seeds away in wreaths that we hung on a railing outside.

I don’t know if they ever came back to get any of those seeds.
It seems like the Titmouse and Chickadees are incredibly busy little birds compared to the others. I could see Titmice way up in the very tops of the trees, 80-100 feet off the ground. Then I found them down in a tangle of branches on the ground next to the stream. At the base of a large tree on the edge of the water they were actually jumping into little dark cavities in the base of the tree trunk.

I couldn't figure out what they were doing. I thought they were bathing, but they never went into the water. I couldn't see any seeds they were retrieving. Constantly jumping around in a flurry of activity. Will have to study them some more to figure it out!
 
Perched serenely on a branch overlooking a pond full of geese, an immature Bald Eagle (2nd/3rd yr?) who finally stirred, leaned forward, pooped copiously -- expected it was about to fly off, but instead turned halfway around for a moment, then around again to settle back into its original position. No sign of what it had for breakfast, though one could guess. (SLC 15x56)
 
At the weekend with my 30x70 binos at WWT Slimbridge. Huge numbers of lapwing, golden plover, knot, geese, widgeon, teal, some crane and many more. Amazing place! My Nikon 8x30E2 got little use as they were narrow in comparison. Very windy, so I am asking Santa for a better tripod.

Peter
Peter:
Have you been naughty or nice ? :)
Merry Christmas to everyone on here.
Jerry
 
Went for a hike yesterday, in pleasant wx, but with relatively few birds - 7 species total, none unusual. The day prior went out to local ag field and managed to find a Lapland Longspur in a flock of Horned Larks. The former a lifer ;-)
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top