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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

What did you see in your binoculars today? (1 Viewer)

I would assume so too, but I did wonder if they took them home for the kiddies.

No way to tell.
Oh. Of course. I understand your question now. I'm not sure if eggs have started hatching here yet. We've had a pretty late spring so far. I'll start paying better attention.
 
Three juvenile Red-tailed Hawks in the nest (parents still out hunting in the early evening, saw one) with darker feathers now and acting restless. Walking out onto branches, looking down and out, flapping their wings enough to rise briefly above the nest... it won't be long now. (SLC HD 10x42)
 
For a long time I wanted to go searching for owls but didn’t have binoculars suitable for that. So I purchased a Habicht 7x42 for that purpose. With it today I went to a forest nearby to search for woodcocks because I have never seen one before. I wasn’t lucky enough to see one but encountered an unexpected cutie. It was a baby tawny owl. This is my first time to see one. I heard the call and looked for it and saw it around three meters away from me on a low tree branch. I heard the call of three of them. I am still thrilled 😁 Unfortunately I couldn’t take any photograph of it.
 
For a long time I wanted to go searching for owls but didn’t have binoculars suitable for that. So I purchased a Habicht 7x42 for that purpose. With it today I went to a forest nearby to search for woodcocks because I have never seen one before. I wasn’t lucky enough to see one but encountered an unexpected cutie. It was a baby tawny owl. This is my first time to see one. I heard the call and looked for it and saw it around three meters away from me on a low tree branch. I heard the call of three of them. I am still thrilled 😁 Unfortunately I couldn’t take any photograph of it.
Congratulations! What a great encounter!
Most of the owls I have seen I did see in broad daylight. In my experience, following their calls and/or using your knowledge of them is more promising than searching the darkness with binoculars.
I'd love to see a photo of the baby tawny owl. I have never seen one.
 
Congratulations! What a great encounter!
Most of the owls I have seen I did see in broad daylight. In my experience, following their calls and/or using your knowledge of them is more promising than searching the darkness with binoculars.
I'd love to see a photo of the baby tawny owl. I have never seen one.
Thank you @jafritten. This is the first time I encountered an owl in Germany and long weited to see one. It was around 10.00 pm and binoculars was not very much useful at that time. However, I was lucky enough to see it roosting very close to me in a low tree branch. At that point Habicht 7x42 was enough to identify it. My wife was with me and she also confirmed the ID. I was not prepared for that situation so didn’t have a camera with me. I tried to take a photo with my Mobil phone but it didn’t focus due to the low light. When I ask for my wife’s mobile phone, which is a better one than my one, it flew away. So no photos we could take. However, it was not afraid of us and let us seeing it for a few minutes before flew away. Unfortunately, I forgot to record the sound of it as well.
 
The Mourning Warbler was found at Reddish Knob — one of the highest points in the Shenandoah Mountains on the Virginia / West Virginia border.

The Golden-winged Warbler was found at Mountain Lake Road Overlook near Blacksburg, VA.

Neither is a common species in VA. However, both of these spots are known locations for these species.

Another not so common VA bird - Red Crossbill.
thank you! This is a good motivator for me, I don't travel much for birding but I should get up to the mountains here (new england) more often, many of the warblers are up there in summer....along with Gray Jays and boreal chickadees and lots of other good stuff
 
Hi,

didn't have bins on me, but does the ring necked pheasant, which I narrowly managed to avoid on this mornings bike commute to work, count?

No images either as it obviously was about as frightened as me and hastily retreated into some shrubbery at the side of the bike path ;-)

Joachim
 
Today I had an evening walk in a near by forest patch with my newly purchased ddoptics nighteagle ergo 8x56 gen 3 dx. I saw a wild rabbit for the first time in that forest patch. Here is a photograph taken trough binoculars.IMG_6268.jpeg
 
Today I had an evening walk in a near by forest patch with my newly purchased ddoptics nighteagle ergo 8x56 gen 3 dx. I saw a wild rabbit for the first time in that forest patch. Here is a photograph taken trough binoculars.

Hi,

I would opt for hare rather than rabbit with those ears...

Joachim
 
I noticed that they look different, an adult one and a young one, I suppose.
yes, very much so, the adult (your second pic down) also looks more heavily marked than most of the birds we see in London. It used to be that they were placed in the subspecies Falco peregrinus germanicus, but I don't think this is the case any more. Interestingly, one of the London birds with those heavier/darker markings is believed (via ringing info) to have been ringed as a youngster in the Netherlands.
 

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