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What do you do if/when....... (1 Viewer)

CliveP

Well-known member
..... you've gone mental and bought to many bins etc. To many to possibly need to use and yet you like them all and want to keep them all and not sell any and no doubt will want to buy more in future even though you know it's a bit daft?

I've gone for years with just one large bin and one small and it was fine but I cracked somewhere along the line.

I sort of think that some will wear or break and that will be that and I will not replace those unless I find that spec/model most useful.

I've got that feeling of possessions beginning to own you and I'm sure I am not alone in this and many have thought the same.

I think the difference this time is that in the past I did sell off any excess (mainly alpha's or high end mid range bins as I bought something similar new to try) but I now find I want to keep all these "best value" bins?

I used to think that I wouldn't be happy with anything less that those high end mostly European models but this evidently has not happened I think largely due to advances in cheap labour producing economies.
 
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gunut

Registered Offender
in the same boat....think its just a human condition...as long as you are paying your bills and save a little I think your OK...just don't let it get out of hand....I have more mid-priced binoculars than I need....everything from small monoculars through 10x50 binos.......Bushnell on the low end, Zeiss on the high end...but no real high end stuff...oldest are some Zeiss from the 20s to the new stuff.....also have a safe full of firearms...mostly shotguns but some rifles and handguns....go to optic shows and gunshows probably once a month and jaw with the other local addicts...at least with guns its easier to rationalize having more than you need as being a collection......not as easy with optics..
 

Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
There are just so many good binoculars on the market and
this is all very tempting. The mid and lower prices bins are now quite good as you
said. What I have been reminding myself these days when I get an itch is that many
of the bins are clones coming out of the same big Asian OEMs with only different external
packaging and minor or even superficial differences. This makes me realize I only need to choose
one or two that catch my eye for whatever reason.
I ask myself if I really need another bin and the answer is invariable no,
so I don't end up buying. This bins forum and going to the store to look at binos doesn't help however.

The most bins I had at once I think was 5. I felt it was too many and now I have three, but one is essentially a collectible (Classic Zeiss porro) and I don't use it for birding (metal cups and I wear glasses). So I just have the full size which I mainly use and a little clone 6x30 porro that I use once in a blue and I may sometime add a 10x, but still not sure about that yet. I may decide to get a pocket instead. But, I won't go beyond this.

All of 2014 and part of 2015 I did a de-clutter project and sold lots of stuff on eBay , donated stuff, gave
some to friends, recycled or dumped and sold some through a local consignment shop. All I can say to you is that it feels so good to have less clutter and I'm very happy I got rid of so much stuff that was just laying around. I had a bunch of collectibles, but only the special ones I really like remain now and they are few.
I suggest writing a pros/cons list or just asking yourself some honest questions on paper. It seems to clarify the
issue in your head when you write about it.

However, for the sake of a balanced argument, if the little bino collection makes you happy there is nothing truly wrong with it. As my good friend and neighbor always says ..."when they are lowering me in the coffin I won't be thinking about this...". And likewise I think it was Sancho who once said that he won't be thinking or worrying about how many bins he bought when he is old and laying in a hospital bed with a bunch of tubes in his body.
 
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CliveP

Well-known member
I always feel a little sad when some-one dies (how did we get to death and tubes etc, thanks Sancho) leaving great optics and you probably see them on auction sold off by a relative who knows nothing about the bin and if you buy it you imagine what it might have seen and the enjoyment it gave.

No-one I know would much appreciate my bin hoard (collection) and they won't fetch much either I would imagine.

At least one reason I don't wanna die I suppose, unless they have more bins in wherever o:D (now I understand this icon)
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Clive

A good way I have found to get around this subliminal feeling of guilt (which it surely is) is to sit down with each of your bins in turn and analyse (notice the beginning of the word analyse? Its anal :-O) what they are best at.

Giving each of your bins a job description gives them each an individual personality so they no longer coalesce into a crowd but acquire a separate and (for you) a valid reason for them to stay in your stable. Note I said 'stable' and not collection because when they all have a job to do they are no longer a 'collection' but a workforce.

For me it works like this:

Terra ED 8x32: hazardous environments when carrying a lot of photo gear (eg when scrambling among rock-pools next to the sea).
Conquest HD 8x32: when in habitat likely to contain many butterflies and dragonflies etc nearby as well as distant birds, or in benign habitats but carrying serious photo gear.
HT 8x42: On any day when the sky is leaden with dark clouds or getting near twilight.
SF 8x42: All purpose bins on most days and in most habitats.
FL 8x32: As for SF but when a compact and lighter bin is preferred.
SF 10x42: For big open landscapes or by-the-seascapes.
Conquest HD 15x56: Nature reserves with hides (blinds) or set up on tripod at rented cottage overlooking sea.
Victory Compact 8x20: always next to my computer workstation for grabbing views of passing Sparrowhawks or Great Spotted Woodpeckers in the oaks at the bottom of our garden.

See what I mean. They all have different jobs so they are all essential. :t: :t:

Lee
 
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Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
I always feel a little sad when some-one dies (how did we get to death and tubes etc, thanks Sancho) leaving great optics and you probably see them on auction sold off by a relative who knows nothing about the bin and if you buy it you imagine what it might have seen and the enjoyment it gave.

No-one I know would much appreciate my bin hoard (collection) and they won't fetch much either I would imagine.

At least one reason I don't wanna die I suppose, unless they have more bins in wherever o:D (now I understand this icon)

I feel the same way. Last week a coworker gave me an old Peterson
bird guide with paint dabs all over it. It is signed inside and my friend said it was used by a woman who painted wildlife and landscapes. I imagined her with book open and at her easel and how much she referred to the book. I looked her up online briefly and saw a couple of her paintings! She is a renowned NJ artist and I need to research her a bit more. I'm not sure if she is still around or not, but I will send the book to her or family eventually if they want it back. My friend said it was just left behind in a house and of course she thought to give it to me since I'm 'the bird lady' at work.
 

gunut

Registered Offender
Clive

A good way I have found to get around this subliminal feeling of guilt (which it surely is) is to sit down with each of your bins in turn and analyse (notice the beginning of the word analyse? Its anal :-O) what they are best at.

Giving each of your bins a job description gives them each an individual personality so they no longer coalesce into a crowd but acquire a separate and (for you) a valid reason for them to stay in your stable. Note I said 'stable' and not collection because when they all have a job to do they are no longer a 'collection' but a workforce.

For me it works like this:

Terra ED 8x32: hazardous environments when carrying a lot of photo gear (eg when scrambling among rock-pools next to the sea).
Conquest HD 8x32: when in habitat likely to contain many butterflies and dragonflies etc nearby as well as distant birds, or in benign habitats but carrying serious photo gear.
HT 8x42: On any day when the sky is leaden with dark clouds or getting near twilight.
SF 8x42: All purpose bins on most days and in most habitats.
SF 10x42: For big open landscapes or by-the-seascapes.
Conquest HD 15x56: Nature reserves with hides (blinds) or set up on tripod at rented cottage overlooking sea.
Victory Compact 8x20: always next to my computer workstation for grabbing views of passing Sparrowhawks or Great Spotted Woodpeckers in the oaks at the bottom of our garden.

See what I mean. They all have different jobs so they are all essential. :t: :t:

Lee

Maybe they should start a forum for just having one bin like say a top quality 8 x 30/32.....and being happy with that.....but that might go against the forums prime objective.....:-C
 
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Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
I feel the same way. Last week a coworker gave me an old Peterson
bird guide with paint dabs all over it. It is signed inside and my friend said it was used by a woman who painted wildlife and landscapes. I imagined her with book open and at her easel and how much she referred to the book. I looked her up online briefly and saw a couple of her paintings! She is a renowned NJ artist and I need to research her a bit more. I'm not sure if she is still around or not, but I will send the book to her or family eventually if they want it back. My friend said it was just left behind in a house and of course she thought to give it to me since I'm 'the bird lady' at work.

Thats a nice thought GiGi but I wouldn't be surprised if the artist would have liked to think that her much used Peterson would have another life with a genuine 'bird lady'.

Lee
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Maybe they should start a forum for just having one bin like say a top quality 8 x 30/32.....and being happy with that.....but that might go against the forums prime objective.....

Gunny

I don't think the Forum was set up to sell bins but your idea for a place for folks with one fave bin that does everything they need sounds great. Why not start that thread here?

Lee
 

perterra

Well-known member
..... you've gone mental and bought to many bins etc. To many to possibly need to use and yet you like them all and want to keep them all and not sell any and no doubt will want to buy more in future even though you know it's a bit daft?

I've gone for years with just one large bin and one small and it was fine but I cracked somewhere along the line.

I sort of think that some will wear or break and that will be that and I will not replace those unless I find that spec/model most useful.

I've got that feeling of possessions beginning to own you and I'm sure I am not alone in this and many have thought the same.

I think the difference this time is that in the past I did sell off any excess (mainly alpha's or high end mid range bins as I bought something similar new to try) but I now find I want to keep all these "best value" bins?

I used to think that I wouldn't be happy with anything less that those high end mostly European models but this evidently has not happened I think largely due to advances in cheap labour producing economies.

Just proof that advertising really works as it's supposed to, you just know you cant live with out the best.

I started thinning the herd on all of my possessions about 5 or 6 years ago. Optics is not something I ever had enough of to be considered obsessive but I was over the top on other stuff (Randall knives, fishing gear, motorcycles, firearms and cameras). These days I dont buy to own, I buy to use. If it's not getting used it goes on to a new owner. Your possessions can quickly become possessors if you let them.

But it's all relative to your situation. to ever who inherits what I leave behind it's just stuff, no one will see the memories I have in whats there. In my case, I'm trying to keep that moderation in all things bit going in every part of my life.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
It is when a dream contains binoculars that one has to wonder.
At least with gunuts weapons, I suppose if one finds oneself in the situation in the movie Tremors one might find them useful.

If one has the means to have a world class collection in a purpose built air conditioned museum in ones basement then it makes sense. And then sell the collection to an eastern monarch for a good sum, while still actually having the equivalent in storage.
This was with cameras. but the same applies to any collection.

I was privileged to see and examine two major collections, one being off limits to most. There was a third I never managed to see.

P.S.
See Jack Naylor, Wikipedia.
I was privileged to spend an afternoon and have a meal there. A wonderful collection.
 
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Binastro

Well-known member
And the person with one faulty old distressed 8x30 binocular normally worth £4 on a good day.

If one was shipwrecked on a small island, having this binocular might become a lifesaver.
One could start a fire with an objective and use the other half to spot things and work out ones location, including longitude, if one had a low price Timex watch working.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Clive

A good way I have found to get around this subliminal feeling of guilt (which it surely is) is to sit down with each of your bins in turn and analyse (notice the beginning of the word analyse? Its anal :-O) what they are best at.

Giving each of your bins a job description gives them each an individual personality so they no longer coalesce into a crowd but acquire a separate and (for you) a valid reason for them to stay in your stable. Note I said 'stable' and not collection because when they all have a job to do they are no longer a 'collection' but a workforce.

For me it works like this:

Terra ED 8x32: hazardous environments when carrying a lot of photo gear (eg when scrambling among rock-pools next to the sea).
Conquest HD 8x32: when in habitat likely to contain many butterflies and dragonflies etc nearby as well as distant birds, or in benign habitats but carrying serious photo gear.
HT 8x42: On any day when the sky is leaden with dark clouds or getting near twilight.
SF 8x42: All purpose bins on most days and in most habitats.
SF 10x42: For big open landscapes or by-the-seascapes.
Conquest HD 15x56: Nature reserves with hides (blinds) or set up on tripod at rented cottage overlooking sea.
Victory Compact 8x20: always next to my computer workstation for grabbing views of passing Sparrowhawks or Great Spotted Woodpeckers in the oaks at the bottom of our garden.

See what I mean. They all have different jobs so they are all essential. :t: :t:

Lee
God! Troubador. You have enough money tied up in binoculars to buy a small house. Nice collection though. You definitely must have a blue Z tattoo somewhere on you. You own almost every model Zeiss sells! Try a Swaro sometime I won't rat on you to Zeiss. They are pretty nice. I only have my Swarovski Swarovision 8x32 SV and the 10x50 SV and I question if I need the 8x32 SV. I used to have beater binoculars for tough conditions like you but then I thought one day why I am using this cheap stuff when I have a Swarovision at home? I use the expensive stuff now ALL the time. If I break it I send it in to SONA.
 
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looksharp65

Well-known member
Obviously,
like most people here on the forum, I own more binoculars than I can justify. However, one thing keeps me back from repeated, compulsory buying and that is the imperative of clockwise-focusing binoculars.
After testing two top binoculars in 8x and 10x I also took the decision to dump the 10s, though I have a Zeiss Dialyt 10x40 that was my father's before he passed away.
My previous opinion that always bringing a 6,5x32 and a 10x32 covers everything became obsolete after the 8x revelation.

Now I have a 7x42 at home and a 7x43 at work, for the occasions when I need to go birding right after work and don't have time to go home for the other. Same with the scopes.
The 7x42 is sometimes substituted with the 8x30 E II, the very same sample that convinced me to get rid of the 10x32 FL and the 10x32 HG/Premier/Venturer.
When I'm out for a more casual and mobile birding style, and to/from work I have the Meostar 8x32, which has become my most used binocular. And finally one 6,5x32 for quick glances from my living-room, but now on long-term loan to a friend.

So: one for sentimental value, two main binoculars for being the most versatile configuration, one for having the most beautiful and life-like view, one great everyday beater and one beater/loaner/warbler chaser.

I guess that if I had bought the Meostar 8x32 in 2009 to complement the Dialyt 10x40, I would probably still only own those, no more, and live in blissful ignorance (the view in these two is not very different).

//L
 
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Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
God! Troubador. You have enough money tied up in binoculars to buy a small house. Nice collection though. You definitely must have a blue Z tattoo somewhere on you. You own almost every model Zeiss sells! Try a Swaro sometime I won't rat on you to Zeiss. They are pretty nice. I only have my Swarovski Swarovision 8x32 SV and the 10x50 SV and I question if I need the 8x32 SV. I used to have beater binoculars for tough conditions like you but then I thought one day why I am using this cheap stuff when I have a Swarovision at home? I use the expensive stuff now ALL the time. If I break it I send it in to SONA.

Yo Dennis

I have owned Swift, Leica and Swarovski in the past and it was an original Swarovski EL that showed me how terrific a close-focusing instrument can be.

But the Swifts let in water, the Leica's focus wheel went loose and the Swaro's focus action went crazy and even sending it back to Absam didn't get it right.

Swaros and Leicas are great instruments but there came a point when I looked back at all the great observing experiences I had had with Zeisses and and the dodgy experiences with the others and I decided to stop experimenting with other brands and stay with the big Z. But I still respect other brands and in the not too distant future I hope to take a look at a Meopta or two as I have been impressed with what I have seen of them at Bird Fair.

I am not sure I exactly regard any of my bins as beaters although the Terras come closest.

You've got several bases covered with your two Swaros so please don't get rid of the 32. Your little Swaro has become iconic on here and it is a fine instrument. Plus there will come a time when hanging a 50 around your neck will seem like a pretty tiresome idea.

Lee
PS I forgot the FL 8x32s so I will add those to the list.
 
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CliveP

Well-known member
Clive

A good way I have found to get around this subliminal feeling of guilt (which it surely is) is to sit down with each of your bins in turn and analyse (notice the beginning of the word analyse? Its anal :-O) what they are best at.

Giving each of your bins a job description gives them each an individual personality so they no longer coalesce into a crowd but acquire a separate and (for you) a valid reason for them to stay in your stable. Note I said 'stable' and not collection because when they all have a job to do they are no longer a 'collection' but a workforce.

For me it works like this:

Terra ED 8x32: hazardous environments when carrying a lot of photo gear (eg when scrambling among rock-pools next to the sea).
Conquest HD 8x32: when in habitat likely to contain many butterflies and dragonflies etc nearby as well as distant birds, or in benign habitats but carrying serious photo gear.
HT 8x42: On any day when the sky is leaden with dark clouds or getting near twilight.
SF 8x42: All purpose bins on most days and in most habitats.
SF 10x42: For big open landscapes or by-the-seascapes.
Conquest HD 15x56: Nature reserves with hides (blinds) or set up on tripod at rented cottage overlooking sea.
Victory Compact 8x20: always next to my computer workstation for grabbing views of passing Sparrowhawks or Great Spotted Woodpeckers in the oaks at the bottom of our garden.

See what I mean. They all have different jobs so they are all essential. :t: :t:

Lee

I feel a little depressed now after reading that list. Still, I am getting a replacement for my Carson 7x18 porro soon and that is a fun little bin, if it works.


Thats a nice thought GiGi but I wouldn't be surprised if the artist would have liked to think that her much used Peterson would have another life with a genuine 'bird lady'.

Lee

My Optima monoc came from Oxfam and I felt this also. Nothing would be better than having your bins enjoyed as much when you no longer, well you know, need them, so remember me, just in case now, won't you8-P I'm sure I could squeeze them in somehow;) o:D
 

Kammerdiner

Well-known member
Like most around here, I was fine until I stumbled upon this crazy forum. I was birding for ten years with an 8x42, an 8x25, and a so-so scope. Happy as a clam, too.

Since joining I've gone through a lot of stuff and unfortunately I'm lazy enough to let it pile up a little. I sold four binos, gave away three more, gave away the so-so scope. There's still work to be done though.

On the plus side, and thanks in large part to all the great experience shared on this forum, I've settled on the stuff that works best for me and I'm happy as a clam again. Even happier, because top-notch optics make a difference. And top-notch does not always mean top dollar either, not these days.

Thanks to all.

Mark
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Yo Dennis

I have owned Swift, Leica and Swarovski in the past and it was an original Swarovski EL that showed me how terrific a close-focusing instrument can be.

But the Swifts let in water, the Leica's focus wheel went loose and the Swaro's focus action went crazy and even sending it back to Absam didn't get it right.

Swaros and Leicas are great instruments but there came a point when I looked back at all the great observing experiences I had had with Zeisses and and the dodgy experiences with the others and I decided to stop experimenting with other brands and stay with the big Z. But I still respect other brands and in the not too distant future I hope to take a look at a Meopta or two as I have been impressed with what I have seen of them at Bird Fair.

I am not sure I exactly regard any of my bins as beaters although the Terras come closest.

You've got several bases covered with your two Swaros so please don't get rid of the 32. Your little Swaro has become iconic on here and it is a fine instrument. Plus there will come a time when hanging a 50 around your neck will seem like a pretty tiresome idea.

Lee
PS I forgot the FL 8x32s so I will add those to the list.
Swarovski has had problems with their focuser's haven't they? They either are harder in one direction or they are sticky. Sometimes they smooth up and sometimes they don't. Weird. It is a problem they need to address. I understand your loyality to the Zeiss brand. They have made excellent binoculars for over 135 years. I see why you have the SF's after trying them. I want one now but I don't really need one. I don't know if I would get the 8x42 SF or 10x42 SF. How do you like that 15x56 Conquest HD? That sounds like it would be awesome for distant shore birds.
 
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