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what will be brighter in dark hours - Swarovski EL 8.5x42 SV or Meopta B1 8x56? (1 Viewer)

NDhunter

Experienced observer
United States
The Meopta 8x56 will be brighter at any age of user, I have not tried this model, but have experience with larger objective binoculars.
I do own the Swarovski 8.5x42 SV.

Jerry
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
The Meopta B1 8x56 will KILL the Swarovski 8.5x42 in low light. That huge 56 mm aperture pulls in 55% more light than the 42 mm aperture in the Swarovski. An 8x56 is usually considered one of the brightest hand held binoculars you can buy.
 
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jaymann

Well-known member
So All you guys are saying that even 91% light transmission of Swarovski will be beaten by 88% light transmission of Meopta? If yes , then my other question is that will SLC 8x56 with 93% light transmission be a lot brighter than Meopta or will they be close?
 

dries1

Member
If those transmission values are accurate, one with good eyesight would notice 5% difference in transmission. At 2% difference in transmission in the same aperture and magnification, I doubt many observers could notice the difference.

Andy W.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Henry Link.

"I don't think transmission differences of less than about 3% are detectable by eye. At least that's my threshold in a very careful direct comparison between two optical devices. 5% is relatively easy to detect in a direct comparison and 10% is very obvious. I'm reasonably certain that fractions of 1% are invisible. There is probably a 1-3% sample variation in different specimens of the same model binocular. Since light transmission curves in optics are never straight lines we often detect differences in the transmission curves of two devices as color differences rather than brightness differences."
 

jaymann

Well-known member
Henry Link.

"I don't think transmission differences of less than about 3% are detectable by eye. At least that's my threshold in a very careful direct comparison between two optical devices. 5% is relatively easy to detect in a direct comparison and 10% is very obvious. I'm reasonably certain that fractions of 1% are invisible. There is probably a 1-3% sample variation in different specimens of the same model binocular. Since light transmission curves in optics are never straight lines we often detect differences in the transmission curves of two devices as color differences rather than brightness differences."
Denco, because 3% difference is not obvious. Will 8x56 meopta will be a lot brighter than EL 8.5x42 because of 55% more light entering into the binocular? Will the difference be noticeable only when my eyes are dilated more than 5mm ?
 

Dale Forbes

SWAROVSKI OPTIK Austria
Henry Link.

"I don't think transmission differences of less than about 3% are detectable by eye. At least that's my threshold in a very careful direct comparison between two optical devices. 5% is relatively easy to detect in a direct comparison and 10% is very obvious. I'm reasonably certain that fractions of 1% are invisible. There is probably a 1-3% sample variation in different specimens of the same model binocular. Since light transmission curves in optics are never straight lines we often detect differences in the transmission curves of two devices as color differences rather than brightness differences."

A few years ago, we did a little (non-scientific) experiment playing around with transmission and who could detect what. We integrated colour-neutral grey filters directly in to the binoculars and - if my memory serves me correct - it turned out that during the day, (almost) none of us could tell which binoculars had a 5% reduction filter, but most could tell which was the "duller" binocular with 7% and 10% filters. A few more could pick the -5% at dusk.

Colour effects (varying transmission curves) were, however, super obvious. Even slight changes in the colour fidelity were immediately obvious and had us wildly guessing which binocular had the higher transmission. Two binoculars with the same standard transmission value but differing in their "warmness" or "coolness" had people perceiving the one or other binocular to be significantly brighter than the other.
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
A few years ago, we did a little (non-scientific) experiment playing around with transmission and who could detect what. We integrated colour-neutral grey filters directly in to the binoculars and - if my memory serves me correct - it turned out that during the day, (almost) none of us could tell which binoculars had a 5% reduction filter, but most could tell which was the "duller" binocular with 7% and 10% filters. A few more could pick the -5% at dusk.

Colour effects (varying transmission curves) were, however, super obvious. Even slight changes in the colour fidelity were immediately obvious and had us wildly guessing which binocular had the higher transmission. Two binoculars with the same standard transmission value but differing in their "warmness" or "coolness" had people perceiving the one or other binocular to be significantly brighter than the other.
Thanks Dale. Good to hear from you.

Lee
 

Mark9473

Well-known member
Belgium
If those transmission values are accurate, one with good eyesight would notice 5% difference in transmission. At 2% difference in transmission in the same aperture and magnification, I doubt many observers could notice the difference.

Andy W.

All true, but the OP asked about dark hours and then, given his young age, it is the exit pupil that counts. The 8x56 will be twice as bright, give or take the few % difference in transmission. This assumes an eye pupil size of at least 7 mm in the dark.
 

kestrel1

Well-known member
Hello

In 2013 I had EL SV 8,5x42 and 8x56 Nobilem. You get 8x56 brightness benefit if you do serious owl watching up to night or during moonlight. For standard dusk after sunset you can live comfortably with 8/8,5x42. Before few months from pure curiosity I compared my SLCs 8x42 with EDG 7x42, and frankly speaking cannot recall what was the difference. Really subtle, but during day bigger EP allows more relaxed eye placement and EDG is better in dense forest due better DoF, but worse on meadows with open areas. So go for 8x56 if you like more relaxed eye placement during day or you are out in field during moonshine. In my country not that safe when hunters there.
 

jan van daalen

Well-known member
are saying that from experience with Meopta and Swaro or just guessing? i can get Meopta 8x56 for $850 vs SLC 8x56 for $1950. I already own 8.5x42 EL. So I am trying to decide.
First of all, you asked for the difference in dusk use in a 42 versus 56mm and now you are talking about 56 versus 56. Considering your age, you can't compare a 42 with a 56 during dusk and dawn use (under the condition of almost the same quality).

To bring it subtle, I have them all.
If you want the best of the best in this area (56mm) I would go for the Zeiss HT54 or the SLC56.
The Meopta 56 is value for money and nearly as good as the other two........ but not as good.
It's quite simple, top quality spoils you and once you've gotten used to it...........
And don't rule out the after sales period. Swaro's customer support is top notch.

Jan
 

WJC

Well-known member
First of all, you asked for the difference in dusk use in a 42 versus 56mm and now you are talking about 56 versus 56. Considering your age, you can't compare a 42 with a 56 during dusk and dawn use (under the condition of almost the same quality).

To bring it subtle, I have them all.
If you want the best of the best in this area (56mm) I would go for the Zeiss HT54 or the SLC56.
The Meopta 56 is value for money and nearly as good as the other two........ but not as good.
It's quite simple, top quality spoils you and once you've gotten used to it...........
And don't rule out the after sales period. Swaro's customer support is top notch.

Jan
There you go with all that LOGIC stuff, again!

BC
 

dries1

Member
All true, but the OP asked about dark hours and then, given his young age, it is the exit pupil that counts. The 8x56 will be twice as bright, give or take the few % difference in transmission. This assumes an eye pupil size of at least 7 mm in the dark.
I was speaking of two 8X56 binos, not 8.5X42 and 8X56.

Andy W.
 

Pileatus

"Experientia Docet”
United States
Hello , please post your answers.
Thanks
Hello , please post your answers.
Thanks

are saying that from experience with Meopta and Swaro or just guessing? i can get Meopta 8x56 for $850 vs SLC 8x56 for $1950. I already own 8.5x42 EL. So I am trying to decide.
Subject came up in the past....

Since you own a Swaro, get the Swaro 8X56 SLC and stay in the family. Swarovski's service reputation is all the insurance you need.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Denco, because 3% difference is not obvious. Will 8x56 meopta will be a lot brighter than EL 8.5x42 because of 55% more light entering into the binocular? Will the difference be noticeable only when my eyes are dilated more than 5mm ?
[/QUOTE
In my experience an 8x56 will almost always be brighter than an 8.5x42. In bright sunlight you might not notice much difference between the two but even in the daytime you sometimes look into shaded areas or you are under canopy and the 56 mm will be brighter. In low light situations and at dawn and dusk there is no competition between the two. The big 56 mm will kill the 42 mm. That is a big reason I have like 50 mm and above apertures and also for the easier eye placement with the bigger exit pupil.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
are saying that from experience with Meopta and Swaro or just guessing? i can get Meopta 8x56 for $850 vs SLC 8x56 for $1950. I already own 8.5x42 EL. So I am trying to decide.
I had both the Meopta Meostar B1 8x56 and the SLC 8x56 and the Meopta is just as good for less money. Here is a comparison of the Meopta Meostar B1 15x56 and the Swarovski SLC 15x56.

 

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