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Where to watch flowers (1 Viewer)

Had.enough

Registered User
Supporter
I bought this book a while back, and on the few occasions last year when I was able to go out, really enjoyed following in the footsteps of an obviously very knowledgeable botanist, and seeing plenty of new flowers along the way. Although it's a good few years old, a plant site guide is likely to stay up to date for many years.
Some of the directions were uncannily accurate. Others I dipped for being too late in the year.
The trick was to put the places into a map app. or GPS, naming the waypoint as the flower, and then plot the shortest route visiting all the waypoints.

Are there any other good "where to find wild flowers" books out there? Uk, or even Europe?


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Julie50

Mostly in the Midlands :)
Supporter
United Kingdom
Hi Peter,

Do you have Dartmoor 365, by John Hayward, Curlew Publications?

If not might be worth it if you intend to visit. It is an extremely detailed and illustrated “exploration of every one of the 365 square miles in the Dartmoor National Park”.

Apart from being a fascinating read, particularly if you know the area, it details the flowers you will find on the walks.

Oh - you have to get the second edition for the flowers
 
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Xenospiza

Distracted
Supporter
I have a nice guide on where to find flowers in the Netherlands, but it's not much help if you don't speak Dutch (although it has GPS references). The author annoyingly does not give directions to some ultra-rarities he shows a picture of, the message clearly being: "Get into the inner circle yourself!"
When I lived in the UK I was lucky that there were some very helpful people around.
I like these types of guide though, if only to find places to visit.
For really rare plants, sharing the locations publicly may not be the smartest thing to do anyway, but I always like finding out sites by some smart searching!
 

Had.enough

Registered User
Supporter
I'm not really worthy of seeing some of the rarest flowers, with so many regular species not seen. The Purbecks book has over 250 species I have yet to see, which seems incredible, when I think I have covered most local habitats!
But good in these days of restricted travel, that I have plenty of goals to chase relatively locally.
 

Xenospiza

Distracted
Supporter
The Isle of Purbeck is so varied that I guess you'll need a bit of time! I thought I went there twice, but somehow I seem to have no evidence of actually seeing the Early Spider Orchids.
 

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