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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Which binoculars for sports events such as horse races? (1 Viewer)

King has Ross Stepruva 9x35?

Norm,

Brilliant.

Certainly looks like you have correctly identified the bin based on other photos I can find. While there are other models similar in appearance, the Ross 9x35 was "Made in England", making it the most likely candidate arguably. There are also pictures and specific references to Camilla, then Duchess of Cornwall, using a Ross Stepruva 9x35 at the Cheltenham races in March 2012.

Mike
 
Here's what our most distinguished race commentator used to see the far side of the course; looks like a German 10x80 flakglas :
It seems tripods are the secret after all.
I wasn't talking about shorter distances. See if they can run 40km.
A Tiger won't even go after you if he can't get you with the first charge. He's too heavy and uses up too much energy.
Quite clearly on short distances most animals will be faster. But they don't have the stamina.
While I like the idea of your comment. There's a video on the internet of a tiger very motivatingly chasing a pair of indian-looking guys on a motorcycle. Suffice it to say, they got away but I had to change my breeches after watching the video...

Edit: I found the video on youtube just searching "tiger chasing indian motorcyclists". Rewatching it, it seems you were right and it was more a short burst thing.
 
So if I summarize the posts in this thread so far, there seems to be agreement that for watching a tiger chase a human, an E II is recommended, but for the end game where the tiger eats its prey, a 15x60 on tripod is the favored option?

Canip

P.S. I was starting the thread with sports events in mind 🧐
 
Getting back to the original topic . . .

7x would seem to a good choice, particularly as the day wears on, and one might be feeling the effects of one to many 'attitude adjusters' 🥂🍷🥃🍸🍹

In post #2, Thotmosis nominated the original Leitz 7x35B - both stylish and with a 150 m/ 450 ft FOV.
Or there's the current Leica Retrovid version with a 140 m/ 420 ft FOV.

And a more compact and convenient alternative would be the Swarovski 7x21 Curio with a 135 m/ 405 ft FOV.


John
 
I think a Pentax Papilio 6.5x21 would work for horse racing. Compact, light, wide FOV and 6.5x would be easy to hold steady after you had a few Mint Juleps.
 
The following Binocular Purpose Chart came from a Swift Instruments pamphlet and may be of some use here. Note the distinction between indoor and outdoor sports and horse racing. Only the 8x21 and 8x25 appear to satisfy all three. (Of course, Swift is out of business now, so that may be part of the reason.) :unsure:

Binocular Purpose Chart.jpg
 
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Interesting that royalty aren't motivated to flaunt alpha brands.

The following Binocular Purpose Chart...
I find myself wanting to turn this around, to understand the narrowing variety of models in the last 50 years. What fraction of buyers today are interested in yachting or horse racing? How many have dark enough skies for astronomy, or are still using passive optics at "night"? etc (What was "Touring" anyway?)
 
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Thesaurus results for TOURING
Synonyms for TOURING: travelling, traveling, trekking, journeying, wandering, voyaging, tripping, roaming, sailing, pilgrimaging
As a native speaker of English myself I wasn't having trouble understanding the word, merely what Swift meant by it (having covered such things as hiking and sailing separately). Perhaps just being a tourist, as only the largest objectives are deemed unsuitable.

Of course "tripping" isn't a synonym at all, but refers to either stumbling or ingesting LSD. I could do without such desultory replies...
 
I trust this dictionary. The authors are native speakers of English and much more, right?
Of course "tripping" isn't a synonym at all, but refers to either stumbling or ingesting LSD. I could do without such desultory replies...
Tripping as in trotting:
 
I found this quote attached to the video, so apparently it was staged, and if you look close enough you can see the tiger clearly asking "Now?" Good acting on the tigers part especially.

@User_Fafa2015 The tiger was paid actor​

Well when you're king of the jungle, one has lots of time to pursue other interests as acting it seems. It's all coming together now.
So if I summarize the posts in this thread so far, there seems to be agreement that for watching a tiger chase a human, an E II is recommended, but for the end game where the tiger eats its prey, a 15x60 on tripod is the favored option?

Canip

P.S. I was starting the thread with sports events in mind 🧐
You forgot the comment that said the zeiss 20x60 was probably invented for the horse track.

It seems to me, the question really returns to the age old question of what you want to see which then determines which device you will use. Are you interested in inspecting the details and aesthetics of the horses (high mag and/or IS view to enjoy details) or do you want a wide fov so you can watch the race progress to see if there will be an unexpected winner from behind (low mag and/or big fov).

Also in the tiger's defense, I think its hunting is a "sporting event" for them. :eek:
 
At Royal Ascot it seems to me I'd be looking at the jockeys colours and overall race, rather than muscles of individual horses.

Thinking small, lightweight, and steady enough to allow for a glass of champagne in the other hand.
Also should fit in a pocket so there's no strap to drag on my best jacket.
Probably take my 6x30 Opticron roof.
 
You forgot the comment that said the zeiss 20x60 was probably invented for the horse track.
Well, let's not forget that's according to one source who advised it was according to one source :). TBH find the idea very odd as an incentive for a Zeiss project but have tried to imagine a possible scenario. Maybe Zeiss had a horse racing mad and influential senior executive who thought it a good idea; and was supported by market research of Sinclair C5 project level. I wonder how many have ever found their way to a race course.

At Royal Ascot it seems to me I'd be looking at the jockeys colours and overall race, rather than muscles of individual horses.

Thinking small, lightweight, and steady enough to allow for a glass of champagne in the other hand.
Also should fit in a pocket so there's no strap to drag on my best jacket.
Probably take my 6x30 Opticron roof.
I'd imagine that would be the case with 90+ percent of viewers though rather than holding champagne quite a number might be holding the racecard to check against (of course Peter O'Sullevan (post #6) would have already committed the racecard to memory...)
Better warn you your Opticron Traveller has taken offence at being publicly referred to as a 6x30 :whistle:.
 
It seems to me, the question really returns to the age old question of what you want to see which then determines which device you will use. Are you interested in inspecting the details and aesthetics of the horses (high mag and/or IS view to enjoy details) or do you want a wide fov so you can watch the race progress to see if there will be an unexpected winner from behind (low mag and/or big fov).
Good point and while I suppose there might be people on both sides of that preferential choice, I'd think that just enough magnification for definite identification, while also allowing a wide enough view to see how the horses were progressing in relation to each other.
Seems a boring pastime to me, but if I was taken to watch them with a friend it seems that I'd probably just bring my bright and easy to align Curio, which also slips out of the way easily enough once I've had my fill of watching.
 

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