• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Why no other alphas in 8x32? (1 Viewer)

I'm curious why only Swarovski produce a smaller alpha bin.

Having just swapped from the 8.5x42s I'm loving the lighter weight and quality of optics. For me they're only a whisker behind the quality of the 8.5s.
 

marcsantacurz

Well-known member
The Zeiss Victory T*F 8x32 is still a great binocular, from what I've read and is still in production.

And Leica makes the Ultravid HD-Plus 8x32.

I really like the Kowa Genesis 8x33. That's what I use most of the time.

Marc
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
I'm curious why only Swarovski produce a smaller alpha bin.

Having just swapped from the 8.5x42s I'm loving the lighter weight and quality of optics. For me they're only a whisker behind the quality of the 8.5s.
It's about marketing, production and review of how well a new range is received.
Just take the 3 alpha brands.....Swarovski, Zeiss and Leica. The worldwide market for sports optics is wildlife watching, incorporating birding, and hunting. So they set down a template for a new binocular with objective size for the two mains uses. 40 or 42mm and then 50 or 56mm for hunting. Then magnifications, 8 or 10 for the first use and 10,12 or 15 for the hunting enthusiasts. Both sizes can also be used for astronomy purposes.
Later on, with the advent of a smaller size for lightweight compact use, a 32mm model is brought into play.
So at the moment all three produce 42mm models whilst Swarovski have a 32mm to supplement their range. Zeiss is rumoured to be considering a 32mm SF for introduction this or next year.

There are other budget and mid priced brands that fill the niche for 30 and 32mm objective lens binoculars.
Hope this helps.
P
 
It's about marketing, production and review of how well a new range is received.
Just take the 3 alpha brands.....Swarovski, Zeiss and Leica. The worldwide market for sports optics is wildlife watching, incorporating birding, and hunting. So they set down a template for a new binocular with objective size for the two mains uses. 40 or 42mm and then 50 or 56mm for hunting. Then magnifications, 8 or 10 for the first use and 10,12 or 15 for the hunting enthusiasts. Both sizes can also be used for astronomy purposes.
Later on, with the advent of a smaller size for lightweight compact use, a 32mm model is brought into play.
So at the moment all three produce 42mm models whilst Swarovski have a 32mm to supplement their range. Zeiss is rumoured to be considering a 32mm SF for introduction this or next year.

There are other budget and mid priced brands that fill the niche for 30 and 32mm objective lens binoculars.
Hope this helps.
P
That's really helpful - thank you. It'll be interesting to see what the 32mm SFs are like when they're launched.
 

Kevin Conville

yardbirder
I'm curious why only Swarovski produce a smaller alpha bin.

Are you trying to be provocative, or are you really unaware of offerings from Nikon, Leica, Zeiss, Kowa, and maybe others?

If it is the latter then how would you have enough information to make your statement.

I think you're trolling. And, no thanks.
 
Last edited:

dries1

Member
8x32

"I'm curious why only Swarovski produce a smaller alpha bin".

Bring it.

Andy W.
 

Attachments

  • DSCF2486.jpg
    DSCF2486.jpg
    279.7 KB · Views: 229
Are you trying to be provocative, or are you really unaware of offerings from Nikon, Leica, Zeiss, Kowa, and maybe others?

If it is the latter then how would you have enough information to make your statement.

I think you're trolling. And, no thanks.

So my comment was based on noticing that there’s not a similar sized binocular in the Noctivid or Victory SF ranges. From what I’ve read on these forums these, along with the ELs are seen as the current alpha binoculars.

Apologies if I didn’t make that clear or get the definition right.
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
I think you now understand how these top brands operate as I explained, and it's a case of being patient.
Which model Swarovski 8 x 32 do you have, probably the latest version with most recently developed coatings, slightly updated rubber armouring and tinkering to straps and carry cases. Otherwise it's the same binocular that they introduced nearly 20 years ago.
BTW I use a Zeiss Victory FL 8x32.

I'm sure you're not trolling, just asking.

Regards, P

ps There's no guarantee of course that we'll see a Zeiss SF or a Leica Noctuid in 32mm format but wait hopefully. From what I recall Zeiss didn't bring out a 32mm HT a few years back.
 
Last edited:

Gijs van Ginkel

Well-known member
birdingsam,
Meopta makes a top quality Meostar B1 8x32, which can compete very well with other top quality 8x32's and is much cheaper. Even cheaper is the Meopta Meopro 8x32 although not of the same class as the Meostar but still very nice and do not forget the Nikon and Kite 8x30's, and there are more good quality 8x30/8x32's so there is plenty of choice. Since the first production of prism based binoculars around 1900 the 8x30 was considered the best choice for general use and the has, in my opinion, not changed.
Gijs van Ginkel
 

John Frink

Well-known member
Meopta makes a top quality Meostar B1 8x32, which can compete very well with other top quality 8x32's and is much cheaper.
Gijs van Ginkel

Gijs,
I second your motion in favor of the Meostar B1 8x32; I've had the opportunity to compare it to HD, EDG, SV, and FL, and in my opinion the Meostar can hold its head up quite proudly in that exalted company.
John
 

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast
United States
...Which model Swarovski 8 x 32 do you have, probably the latest version with most recently developed coatings, slightly updated rubber armouring and tinkering to straps and carry cases. Otherwise it's the same binocular that they introduced nearly 20 years ago...[/I]

Not exactly. The Swarovision EL has completely different glass from the original EL. The 8x32 version of that was released in ~2012, if I remember correctly.

--AP
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Since the first production of prism based binoculars around 1900 the 8x30 was considered the best choice for general use and the has, in my opinion, not changed.
Gijs van Ginkel

Hello Gijs,

I certainly agree that it is a good choice. Larger objectives, and larger exit pupils add weight; higher magnification adds more shake.

Of course, there is no one binocular to fit every situation. My biggest complaint about this size is that occasionally, I have trouble aligning the objectives, the eyepieces and my own eyes. Four mm exit pupil is a little demanding.

I have owned many models of 8x30 or 8x32, from Nikon, Leica, Zeiss and even Bausch & Lomb. There were many flavours but I only found one to be unsatisfactory.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur Pinewood :hi:
 

Patudo

Well-known member
Since the first production of prism based binoculars around 1900 the 8x30 was considered the best choice for general use and the has, in my opinion, not changed.

I agree to a great extent with this - the number of 8x30 Zeiss Deltrintems and clones that have been and are still being produced must number well over a million. I wonder, though, if fewer people are buying binoculars for general use (as opposed to for birding, hunting, stargazing) now. I agree with Pyrtle it does seem that a new alpha or sub-alpha binocular model/line will most always first be in 8x40 and 10x40 (8x42 and 10x42 nowadays).
 

paddy7

Well-known member
Some thoughts on this whole 8x32/8x30 business:
Firstly, as one ages and the range of dilation of the pupil decreases, the light offered by the EP on - for example - an 8x50 or above is wasted on you.
At that point, the appeal of a smaller, lighter set may be obvious: equally if you do most of your birding outside the extremes of the day (and even then, this may not be too much of a problem with a very good 8x32). Birds tend to go to roost before an 8x32 becomes a disadvantage, i've found.
What may be a further issue, however, is that many smaller binoculars require a little more work on the part of the user. Although the 4mm EP may be enough for your eyes, lining up smaller EPs with the pupil is more of a critical point. Therefore, interpupilliary distance and eye relief may come into play.
For some without the patience to work at this a bit, and get to know their binoculars, this may result in a degree of 'smaller binocular bashing'.
However, you might be missing something, as there are some excellent smaller sets.
I am almost totally converted to more compact bins now; some may be more tricky than others to get used to, but i think it's worth it for the pack size, weight and convenience.
 
Warning! This thread is more than 3 years ago old.
It's likely that no further discussion is required, in which case we recommend starting a new thread. If however you feel your response is required you can still do so.

Users who are viewing this thread

Top