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World's Best 100 Birds (1 Viewer)

rezMole

Well-known member
BarbatusOne said:
You are faulting the list for being something that I never intended it to be, nor could it ever have been.

Agreed.

BarbatusOne said:
Thank you for injecting a little spice into the thread though! It certainly drew more attention to the list than would have otherwise occured.

You're welcome. Personally, i prefer debate to be a bit meaty and vitriolic.

I still think the list is... no, tempted as i am, i'll just say... not MY best 100, which is:

1. Little ringed plover 99% (love the orange bit on the bill)
2. Goosander 98.5% (what a "hair-cut"!)
3. Grey Heron 98.4% (so majestic)
4...
 

rezMole

Well-known member
crispycreme said:
It's the lack of effort you made in your post, in contrast to the gargantuan effort Blake made in presenting his. It was astonishingly disrespectful, and yes, a waste of bandwidth

True - there was little effort in my post - in fact - a miniscule amount.

Disrespectful? Possibly - sorry.

As for a waste of bandwith? Really? I thought i hardly used any!
 

Rasmus Boegh

BF member
rezMole said:
Is it so important to get to see a bird species before it disappears forever?.

It is the other way around. First, through the new knowledge potentially gained from a sighting. Many of the species are virtually unknown - indeed, there are several species on the list where a nest still hasn't been located and absolutely nothing is known about their breeding behavior and requirements. How can we save something where you don't even know the basics? Furthermore, it is clear that the income a birder provide often can (and do) help saving an area. Especially in the so-called Third World Countries (even if I dislike that expression) where locals often only have one other chance, and it certainly doesn't involve saving some obscure bird. Even if you don't have the possibility or don't wish to go and see these birds you only have a chance of saving them if you know about them...

BTW: I'd guess the Banded Ground-Cuckoo should be right up there too, right? For people not knowing this species: Imagine a large terrestrial cuckoo with a black face, crest, and nape, scaled mantle and underparts, maroon wings and iridescent greenish-black tail. Even if it is large it is very shy and occur in amazingly low densities - very few people have ever seen this species. Due to it requiring large tracts of completely undisturbed forest, it would be an obvious indicator species:

http://inventas.co.nz/50rarestbirds/banded.jpg
 
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BarbatusOne

Blake Matheson
Rasmus Boegh said:
: I'd guess the Banded Ground-Cuckoo should be right up there too, right? For people not knowing this species: Imagine a large terrestrial cuckoo with a black head, scaled chest, mantle and underparts, rufous wings and iridescent greenish-black tail. Even if it is large it is very shy and occur in amazingly low densities - very few people have ever seen this species. Due to it requiring large tracts of completely undisturbed forest, it would be an obvious indicator species:

http://inventas.co.nz/50rarestbirds/banded.jpg

I agree. An absolute stunner. In fact it was in the second to last cut on my list, but I ended up deciding to leave it out because of the classification by Birdlife as Vulnerable, rather than Endangered or Critically Endangered. Certainly a flagship species, though, and giving the logging around its habitat though, I am afraid that may change. :C I also almost had Sumatran Ground-Cuckoo on there but decided it's probably conspecific with Javan...what do you think, Rasmus?
 

ed keeble

Well-known member
BarbatusOne said:
I agree. An absolute stunner. In fact it was in the second to last cut on my list, but I ended up deciding to leave it out because of the classification by Birdlife as Vulnerable, rather than Endangered or Critically Endangered. Certainly a flagship species, though, and giving the logging around its habitat though, I am afraid that may change. :C I also almost had Sumatran Ground-Cuckoo on there but decided it's probably conspecific with Javan...what do you think, Rasmus?

I think (if I have understood it right) that Grant's list is personal and subjective, but that he also hopes it will strike a chord with others- i.e. that others will agree that it is a good shot at identifying and ranking 100 birds which are as he puts it: "particularly ''good'' or desirable from the perspective of a world lister". If I am right about that, then to my eye, the list doesn't take quite enough account of how hard (or easy) a species is to see. For example, Northern Bald Ibis is not hard to see in Morocco and I would hazard a guess that few world listers would place it in their top 10.
 

BarbatusOne

Blake Matheson
white-back said:
I think (if I have understood it right) that Grant's list is personal and subjective, but that he also hopes it will strike a chord with others- i.e. that others will agree that it is a good shot at identifying and ranking 100 birds which are as he puts it: "particularly ''good'' or desirable from the perspective of a world lister". If I am right about that, then to my eye, the list doesn't take quite enough account of how hard (or easy) a species is to see. For example, Northern Bald Ibis is not hard to see in Morocco and I would hazard a guess that few world listers would place it in their top 10.

I agree most would not have N. Bald Ibis as high on the list. I have it there because the main thrust of the emphasis is on how endangered is it, and how impressive. It scores perfect marks in these categories, as well as numerical rarity, it is also, now pretty restricted. How hard it is to see, I think, should play a role, but not too great a role. Thus, for me, Bald Ibis ranks very high.

Did I miss something...who's Grant?
 

David Pedder

Well-known member
crispycreme said:
David, I'm afraid we'll have to simply disagree on what constitutes a personal attack. I am not a clinical type of person, and occasionally my posts reflect that, but I am careful not to denigrate the individual. I think we'll have to leave it at that. If the moderators think otherwise, of course they have the right and responsibility to edit and/or admonish. ;) )

crispycreme, Thanks for that. I am more than happy to agree to disagree. I concede your post did not attack the person directly, but there is a person behind the post. Happy birding!
 

BarbatusOne

Blake Matheson
Tim Allwood said:
Javan Ground Cuckoo?

that's a new one on me

I lived there for two years and I've never heard of em!

Do ya mean Bornean? A fantastic bird!!!

Tim

That's right. C. viridis & C. radiatus. Sorry.... I'm bad with my south asian island nations...hopefully the project will also improve my geographical skills. Is everyone now agreed they are NOT con-specific??
 

Rasmus Boegh

BF member
All major lists accept the split between C. viridis and C. radiatus and I am fairly sure they would be "good species" no matter what species concept is applied to the equation. In addition to the differences mentioned by Tim, the scant information suggest a vocal difference, too.
 
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tom mckinney

Well-known member
Hi Blake,

Any chance you could annotate your list with the faunal region each species occurs in? I'd like to look up some of them that I've never heard of, but I don't know where to start!

Cheers,

Tom

PS Feel free to tell me to "sod off" if you haven't got the time! :)
 

Rasmus Boegh

BF member
tom mckinney said:
Hi Blake,

Any chance you could annotate your list with the faunal region each species occurs in? I'd like to look up some of them that I've never heard of, but I don't know where to start!

Cheers,

Tom

The following is from memory, so please do correct me if I made a mistake. Basically a copy n'paste of the original list where I've added my comments.

1. Phillipine Eagle: 99.54% - the Philippines. One of the Worlds largest eagles with a striking bluish bill and pale eyes.
2. Kakapo: 99.33% - All individuals of this flightless parrot live on small closely monitored islands in New Zealand. Males give a very deep booming sound which almost is felt more than it is heard. Worlds heaviest parrot.
3. Bali Starling: 99.14% - Very rare in Bali, Indonesia. Relatively common in captivity and an extensive breeding program was started years ago. Sadly, many (all?) the individuals at the breeding station in Bali were stolen a few years ago, but zoos around the World still participate in the breeding program to bring it back.
4. Ivory-billed Woodpecker: 99.05% - well...
5. Rondonia Bushbird: 98.96% - Rondonia and possibly Mato Grosso in Brazil. No certain recent records. As several other members of the family it may be closely associated with swarming army ants.
6. Kinglet Calyptura: 98.87% - rediscovered in SE Brazil in 1996 after having gone unnoticed for ~100 years. Not seen since those elusive sightings in 1996.
7. Northern Bald Ibis: 98.78% - Middle East, N. Africa. Previously parts of Europe.
8. Marvelous Spatuletail: 98.69% - N. Peru. In flight the male looks like a small hummingbird followed by two large wasps!
9. Maui Parrotbill: 98.6% - Hawaii. All but one member of this family which is endemic to Hawaii are doing poorly, largely due to introduced predators and the introduced avain flu for which they have no resistance. Several species in this family are already extinct, possibly incl. the Poouli where the last known individual died just a few months ago.
10. Glaucous Macaw: 98.51% - Brazil, Paraguay & Argentina (formerly at least, probably extinct). The four blue macaws are all doing poorly. The single species not mentioned in this list (Spix's Macaw) is extinct in the wild, but a captive population exist.
11. Forest Owlet: 98.5% - rediscovered in India a few years ago.
12. Araripe Manakin: 98.32% - This amazing white, black and red manakin was only discovered a few years ago in NE Brazil.
13. Juan Fernandez Firecrown: 98.23% - an island off Chile. Formerly existed on a second island in the same region, but it became extinct on that island.
14. A'kohekohe: 98.14% - Hawaii. Member of the same family as #9.
15. White-eyed River-Martin: 98.05% - Thailand (at least formerly). Ranger only known imperfectly and may be extinct.
16. Streseman's Bristlefront: 97.96% - A strange Tapaculo rediscovered recently in E. Brazil after having gone unnoticed for many years. Not seen since the rediscovery.
17. Pink-headed Duck: 97.87% - possibly extinct, but a highly experianced birder possibly observed it recently.
18. Jerdon’s Courser: 97.78% - India.
19. Night Parrot: 97.68% - Australia. Virtually unknown parrot, presumed to inhabit grassy areas. There have been recent claims of people seeing living individuals, but only confirmed are dead individuals found on the roadside.
20. Trinidad Piping-Guan: 97.59% - on the island of Trinidad north of South America.
21. Gurney’s Pitta: 97.5% - Thailand + a new population was discovered recently in Myanmar, giving the numbers known to exist a much needed boost.
22. New Caledonia Owlet-Nightjar: 97.41% - New Caledonia. One possible sighting relatively recently, but may be extinct.
23. Takahe: 97.22% - New Zealand. Imagine a massive flightless Moorhen with a big red bill!
24. California Condor: 97.13% - USA. Only still alive due to an extensive captive breeding program. Smaller than the Andean Condor, but still a massive bird.
25. Colorful Puffleg: 96.94% - Colombia, another relatively recent rediscovery.
26. Lear's Macaw: 96.85% - NE Brazil. Quite similar to the Hyacinth Macaw, but far rarer.
27. Mauritius Fody: 96.67% - Mauritius.
28. Sociable Lapwing: 96.58% - Europe, parts of Asia. The population has crashed seriously recently.
29. Caerulean Paradise-Flycatcher: 96.49% - Rediscovered a few years ago in Wallacea, Indonesia.
30. Tuamotu Sandpiper: 96.4% - Tuamotu Archipelago in the Pacific.
31. Kagu: 96.21% - New Caledonia. A monotypic family with no obvious close relatives.
32. Philippine Cockatoo: 96.12% - the Philippines.
33. Sao Tome Grosbeak: 96.03% - the island of São Tome off the coast of Nigeria.
34. Crested Ibis: 95.94% - China (and formerly Japan)
35. Black-eared Miner: 95.85% - SE Australia.
36. Golden Parakeet: 95.76% - Central Amazonian Brazil. National bird of Brazil and the same colours as their flag (the Golden Parakeet lack the blue, though).
37. Kokako: 95.67% - New Zealand. Amazing metallic voice!
38. Tooth-billed Pigeon: 95.58% - Samoa in the Pacific. Together with the Crowned Pigeons this may be the Worlds stranges extant Pigeon.
39. Chuuk Monarch: 95.49% - Chuuk (Truk) Island in the Pacific.
40. Dwarf Olive Ibis: 95.4% - the island of São Tome off the coast of Nigeria. A relatively recent split from a more widespread species.
41. Bengal Florican: 95.31% - India, Nepal & Cambodia.
42. Lesser Florican: 95.3% - India. Males have a strange mating display involving a very high jump.
43. Talaud Rail: 95.21% - Recently discovered on Talaud Is., Indonesia.
44. Horned Guan: 95.12% - Highland forest of Central America (far S. Mexico and Guatemala, can't remember if it occur in one of the other small countries down there). Strange red "horn" on the top of the head.
45. Siberian Crane: 95.03% - Breed in far N. Asia. Winters in India, China and Iran. A beautiful white crane.
46. Himalayan Quail: 94.94% - May still exist in the Himalayas, but no confirmed records for a loooong time. OBC are funding a survey that hopefully will relocate it.
47. Blue-billed Curassow: 94.85% - Colombia.
48. Okinawa Woodpecker: 94.76% - Okinawa, Japan.
49. White-winged Guan: 94.57% - Rediscovered in N. Peru a few years ago.
50. Biak Monarch: 94.48% - Biak Is., New Guinea.
51. Storm's Stork: 94.39% - Borneo and Sumatra.
52. Congo Bay-Owl: 94.3% - a relatively recent discovery from DR Congo. May not be closely related to the Bay-Owl in Asia after all.
53. White-eared Night-Heron: 94.31% - SE China (& Vietnam?).
54. Imperial Amazon: 94.22% - One of the Lesser Antilles (I always get them mixed up, St. Vincent or Dominica?). World's largest Amazona Parrot.
55. Peruvian Plantcutter: 94.12% - dry forest and scrub in NW Peru. One of the few birds that feeds largely on leaves.
56. Cebu Flowerpecker: 94.03% - rediscovered a few years ago on Cebu in the Philippines.
57. White-shouldered Ibis: 93.94% - Wetlands in Vietnam, Cambodia and Borneo.
58. Jocotoco Antpitta: 93.85% - Recently discovered in S. Ecuador and may occur in far N. Peru. The type locality is now a reserve, aptly named the Jocotoco Reserve and owned by a foundation named the... Jocotoco Foundation! This foundation own several other reserves in Ecuador, incl. one for the Pale-headed Brush-Finch; probably the most endangered bird in Ecuador. Robert Ridgely plays an important role in this foundation.
59. Regent Honey-eater: 93.76% - Australia.
60. Yellow-eared Parrot: 93.67% - Colombia, at least formerly Ecuador. The Colombian foundation "ProAves" are doing a great job in trying to save this species, but it's certainly still many years from being in a position where it can be considered safe.
61. Fuerte's Parrot: 93.47% - recently rediscovered in Colombia. Same foundation that are involved in the previous parrot are involved in this case.
62. Cherry-throated Tanager: 93.38% - recently rediscovered in SE Brazil.
63. Ultramarine Lorikeet: 93.29% - French Polynesia (if I remember right) in the Pacific. Beautiful mainly blue parrot.
64. Giant Ibis: 93.2% - Cambodia. As the name indicate: Worlds largest Ibis.
65. Grey-necked Rockfowl: 93.11% - aka Picathartes. Gabon, Cameroon & Nigeria. The two strange members of this family breed colonially in caves and on rocks.
66. White-necked Rockfowl: 93.02% - aka Picathartes. W. Africa
67. Campbell Island Teal: 92.93% - Campbell Is., New Zealand.
68. Alagoas Curassow: 92.84% - Probably extinct in the wild (a captive population exists), but at least previously in NE Brazil.
69. Visayan Wrinkled-Hornbill: 92.75% - the Philippines. Sadly, the Philippines is one of the seriously red spots on the World map of endangered animals and plants and the remaining forest is disappearing fast.
70. Seychelles Paradise-Flycatcher: 92.66% - Seychelles.
71. Long-whiskered Owlet: 92.47% - Recently rediscovered in N. Peru. One of the smallest owls in the World.
72. Red-and-Blue Lory: 92.38% - Parts of Wallacea, Indonesia.
73. Pink-billed Parrotfinch: 92.29% - Fiji. Strange parrotfinch with a large pinkish bill, possibly worthy of placement in a monotypic genus.
74. Black Stilt: 92.2% - New Zealand.
75. Blue-throated Macaw: 92.11% - near Trinidad in Bolivia. Until the early 90's where the small population was discovered it was only known from captive individuals of unknown origin.
76. Mauritius Parakeet: 92.02% - Mauritius.
77. Bahia Tapaculo: 91.93% - May be extinct, but at least formerly in NE Brazil.
78. Mallee Emuwren: 91.74% - SE Australia.
79. Red-crowned Crane: 91.64% - NE Asia.
80. Banded Cotinga: 91.55% - E. Brazil. As in the other members of this genus, the male is shiny blue and purple.
81. Laysan Teal: 91.46% - Laysan Is., Hawaii.
82. Hyacinth Macaw: 91.37% - Mostly Brazil. While endangered, fairly common in parts of the Pantanal in Brazil. Worlds longest parrot (heaviest is #2 on this list, the Kakapo) .
83. Shoebill: 91.28% - Swamps in parts of C. Africa; most birders see this strange bird in Uganda. Monotypic family.
84. Snoring Rail: 91.19% - Wallacea, Indonesia.
85. Crested Argus: 91.1% - SE Asia (with two distinctly different subspecies). A pheasant with a massive tail.
86. Amsterdam Albatross: 91.01% - Amsterdam Is. in the S. Indian Ocean. May be better treated as a ssp. of Wandering.
87. Slender-billed Curlew: 90.92% - Probably breeds somewhere in N. Asia if still extant. At least formerly wintered in N. Africa.
88. Udzungwa Forest-Partridge: 90.83% - A recent discovery from Tanzania. A unique partridge, the closests relatives all live in Asia.
89. Elegant Sunbird: 90.74% - Wallacea, Indonesia.
90. Pesquet's or Vulturine Parrot: 90.55% - A primitive parrot from New Guinea.
91. Strange-tailed Tyrant: 90.46% - S. Brazil, Paraguay and N. Argentina. Yes, that tail certainly is strange - used in the display flight performed by the male.
92. Long-tailed Ground-Roller: 90.37% - Member of a small family which is restricted to Madagascar. This species occur in dry scrub and woodland of SW Madagascar.
93. Congo Peafowl: 90.18% - An almost mythical bird found in DR Congo, a country scarred by conflicts and visited by very few.
94. Blyth’s Tragopan: 90.09% - E. Himalayas. A striking pheasant.
95. Helmet Vanga: 90% - Madagascar. This strikingly black and chestnut Vanga has a very large bluish bill for which it is named. This family is nearly endemic to Madagascar (one member occur in the Comoros) and this species occur in undisturbed rainforest in the NE part of the island.
96. Plains Wanderer: 89.91% - the interior of Australia. A monotypic family. As in the Buttonquail which it resemble, the female is more "colourful" than the male.
97. Little Brown Kiwi: 89.82% - As all other members of this family it is restricted to New Zealand. One of the few birds that have a good olfactory sence, used when they search for their main prey, earthworms.
98. Yellow-bellied Asity: 89.73% - There are four members in the Asity family and all are restricted to Madagascar. This one occur in highland forest on the E. part of the island. When this and the single other member in the genus were discovered they were thought to be Sunbirds (and both are often referred to as "Sunbird-Asitys").
99. Black Sicklebill: 89.64% - New Guinea. A Bird-of-Paradise with a very long tail and a long curved bill. Looks quite astonishing in flight.
100. Northern Cassowary: 89.55% - New Guinea (where the two other Cassowaries also occur - furthermore, the Southern Cassowary is found in NE Australia). Suppoedly, they can deliver quite a kick if bothered.

If anyone notice a mistake, don't hesitate to correct it.
 
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tom mckinney

Well-known member
Thanks Blake and Rasmus.

Seen 3 on that list: Sociable Lapwing, Siberian Crane and Lesser Florican. Only 97 to go... I'd better get saving up!
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
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