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Wrynecks in Scotland (1 Viewer)

apbarr

Well-known member
Scotland
I've also seen one singing in the Highlands as well but it was many years ago, probably overlooked in some areas.
 

JTweedie

Well-known member
Excellent stuff - they're on my Birds Not Likely To Ever See list, from that footage the birds are completely different from how I picture them when I see them in bird guides.
 

JTweedie

Well-known member
I rarely go south of the border, concentrating more on birds I can see in Scotland, but I have been thinking of heading down to Norfolk at some point.
 

Phil Andrews

It's only Rock and Roller but I like it
United Kingdom
The Rare Breeding Birds Panel report for 2009 stated three singing males in the Highlands. Would be interesting to know what the 2010 report (not yet available on the net but published via British Birds) recorded.
 

davercox

Dave Cox
Supporter
The Rare Breeding Birds Panel report for 2009 stated three singing males in the Highlands. Would be interesting to know what the 2010 report (not yet available on the net but published via British Birds) recorded.

"Highland Two sites: one singing male recorded on three dates within a two-week period in mid May, and a second bird in suitable habitat in June."

Poor show.
 

halftwo

Wird Batcher
"Highland Two sites: one singing male recorded on three dates within a two-week period in mid May, and a second bird in suitable habitat in June."

Poor show.

Without too much detail: my sister and her husband found a Wryneck while walking near Balmoral a few years ago. It was either singing or at least perching conspicuously.
 

Sandra (Taylor)

Registered User
Supporter
Excellent stuff - they're on my Birds Not Likely To Ever See list, from that footage the birds are completely different from how I picture them when I see them in bird guides.


I agree - I'm sure I wouldn't have been able to identify that from this footage, except for the times it stretched out to reach the leaves. Very interesting.
 

apbarr

Well-known member
Scotland
We found the one in the highlands by call initially, took us a while to actually see the bird. Had Honey Buzzard the same day.
 

Capercaillie71

Well-known member
Wouldn't a weekend on the East coast in autumn sort that out for you?

Try St Abbs, Barns Ness, Fife Ness, Girdle Ness etc. in easterlies in September.

A quick look at the Scottish Bird Report Online suggests that most of those sites average about one bird a year, mostly for one day only and with some blank years. St. Abbs looks to be the best site averaging 2 birds a year with some staying more than one day.

I suspect that Wrynecks are less frequent autumn migrants at Scottish east coast locations than English ones and certainly not an easy species to find at all if you are not regularly visiting an east coast location.

I would love to find a singing bird in my local area (they have been found in the past) like the one in this excellent video. I would hope that the distinctive song would be enough to draw attention to it, no matter how unobtrusive the bird is visually.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
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