• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Yellow feathered bird in Lake District, England (1 Viewer)

sf2

Member
Again....not very good photos....but you can see it has yellow feathers. I have tried identifying using the RSPB site but it only suggests a wagtail of sorts. It was definitely bigger than that.
I saw this at Haweswater resevoir in the Lake District, England.

DSC_0649.jpg

DSC_0649.jpg

DSC_0650.JPG
 
A sane suggestion could be male Siskin - but it looks more like a bunting in structure!

(cross posted with Steve, so its a Siskin then ;) )
 
When you lighten up the photo it seems to show a black cap, and a black bib more clearly than before.
This adds much weight to the male siskin theory. The yellowhammer would not be like this at all.
 
Thank you :)

Please bear with me...I am new to all this identifying birds :) I am succesfully managing many....but are siskins not quite small? That was why I discounted it. I think this bird was about blackbird size....but I might be wrong because I was some distance away.

I am going to listen to a recording of the noise a siskin makes. It was the noise that attracted me to it. It was a singular, maybe 2 second, high pitched whistle.
 
I have listened to the song of a siskin....it just doesn't sound quite right. It was very high pitched and I was a good distance away.
 
Thank you :)

Please bear with me...I am new to all this identifying birds :) I am succesfully managing many....but are siskins not quite small? That was why I discounted it. I think this bird was about blackbird size....but I might be wrong because I was some distance away.

I am going to listen to a recording of the noise a siskin makes. It was the noise that attracted me to it. It was a singular, maybe 2 second, high pitched whistle.

I'm a newbie too, but a LOT of people that see a bird always think that it must be a 'rarer' bird than it is - I myself have been down this road too ;)

99.9999999999999999999999999% of the time it's going to be a regular bird to a particular place and not something more special.

Guide books, bird websites, Google and - last but not at all least - the members on this forum will steer you in the right direction (as they did here).

You did well taking the photos and especially well remembering its call. A call is a great back up because if you can't determine a bird from photos then a call will usually be the deciding judgement on what it is.

Enjoy your birding - it's a fantastic way to spend your free time.
 
99.9999999999999999999999999% of the time it's going to be a regular bird to a particular place and not something more special.

...I think you missed a nine or two o:)....a well summed up common scenario. Often, when the inexperienced see something common very well for the first time, its such a special and personal experience. One they have never had before - even though they think they have had their eyes open, its just got to be something out of the ordinary, very understandable!

It must be said though, that non-birdy folk famously do find screaming rarities very occaisonally so one must be aware of that too when someone says they saw a new bird,smaller than a sparrow with bright blue on the wings for example - it may not be a Blue Tit.


You did well taking the photos and especially well remembering its call. A call is a great back up because if you can't determine a bird from photos then a call will usually be the deciding judgement on what it is.

Enjoy your birding - it's a fantastic way to spend your free time.

Agree on all counts :t:
 
Last edited:
Thank you everyone!

seriously....every single bird is special to me. Recently I had decided to sit in my garden as a sort of mindfulness exercise. Just sit there and observe what was going on. It was incredible! I watched a pair of blackbirds chase off a magpie ...and what a noise they made! I watched the sparrows go back and forwards to their nest next door. The pigeons....well, they are just so funny! Ordinary, every day birds....but just worth really watching. As I sat there (lazily!) on my chair, I watched the sparrowhawk circle, hover then swoop! It is so ordinary but how often do we take the time out of our busy days to do this?

I did know a little from my childhood days but never really paid attention.

So, even if it is telling the difference between a blackbird and a starling, it is an absolute buzz to me! It is like entering a new world that has been here all the time.

So, rare birds are good.....but I am just so happy to be able to identify ordinary, common birds with confidence :) You guys are helping me with that!
 
Warning! This thread is more than 6 years ago old.
It's likely that no further discussion is required, in which case we recommend starting a new thread. If however you feel your response is required you can still do so.

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top