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Youngest record of Presbyornithidae (1 Viewer)

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Vanesa L. De Pietri, R. Paul Scofield, Nikita Zelenkov, Walter E. Boles and Trevor H.Worthy, 2016

The unexpected survival of an ancient lineage of anseriform birds into the Neogene of Australia: the youngest record of Presbyornithidae

Abstract

Presbyornithids were the dominant birds in Palaeogene lacustrine assemblages, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, but are thought to have disappeared worldwide by the mid-Eocene. Now classified within Anseriformes (screamers, ducks, swans and geese), their relationships have long been obscured by their strange wader-like skeletal morphology. Reassessment of the late Oligocene South Australian material attributed to Wilaru tedfordi, long considered to be of a stone-curlew (Burhinidae, Charadriiformes), reveals that this taxon represents the first record of a presbyornithid in Australia. We also describe the larger Wilaru prideauxi sp. nov. from the early Miocene of South Australia, showing that presbyornithids survived in Australia at least until ca 22 Ma. Unlike on other continents, where presbyornithids were replaced by aquatic crown-group anatids (ducks, swans and geese), species of Wilaru lived alongside these waterfowl in Australia. The morphology of the tarsometatarsus of these species indicates that, contrary to other presbyornithids, they were predominantly terrestrial birds, which probably contributed to their longterm survival in Australia. The morphological similarity between species of Wilaru and the Eocene South American presbyornithid Telmabates antiquus supports our hypothesis of a Gondwanan radiation during the evolutionary history of the Presbyornithidae. Teviornis gobiensis from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia is here also reassessed and confirmed as a presbyornithid. These findings underscore the temporal continuance of Australia’s vertebrates and provide a new context in which the phylogeny and evolutionary history of presbyornithids can be examined.

Free pdf: https://www.researchgate.net/public...ralia_the_youngest_record_of_Presbyornithidae

Enjoy,

Fred
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Vanesa L. De Pietri, R. Paul Scofield, Nikita Zelenkov, Walter E. Boles and Trevor H.Worthy, 2020

The unexpected survival of an ancient lineage of anseriform birds into the Neogene of Australia: the youngest record of Presbyornithidae

Royal Society Open Science. 7 (11): Article ID 201430.
doi:10.1098/rsos.201430

free pdf: https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/pdf/10.1098/rsos.150635

Systematic palaeontology

Order Anseriformes Wagler, 1831
Family Presbyornithidae Wetmore, 1926
Genus Wilaru Boles, Finch, Hofheins, Vickers-rich,Walters, & Rich, 2013
Type species: Wilaru tedfordi Boles, Finch, Hofheins, Vickers-Rich, Walters, & Rich, 2013
Type locality and age: Lake Pinpa (=Pine Lake), Site C, South Australia; Namba Formation, late Oligocene (24–26 Ma).
Wilaru prideauxi sp. nov.

Holotype: Right tarsometatarsus SAM P.53136 (formerly UCMP 108052) (figure 2q,r,b).

Type locality and age: Leaf Locality, Lake Ngapakaldi, South Australia (UCMP locality V6213);Wipajiri
Formation; Kutjamarpu Local Fauna; ca 23.4–22Ma [45,46].

Etymology: After vertebrate palaeontologist Gavin Prideaux (1969–), who has worked extensively on
Oligo-Miocene mammalian faunas from South Australia, including the formations bearing fossils of species of Wilaru.

Paratypes: Right coracoid SAM P.23625 (figure 1i,j), Mammalon Hill, Lake Palankarinna, South
Australia; Etadunna Formation Zone D; Ngama Local Fauna; ca 22Ma [45]. Left carpometacarpus SAM P.41255 (figure 2a,b), Mammalon Hill, Lake Palankarinna, South Australia.

Differential diagnosis: Only slightly larger than W. tedfordi but considerably stouter. Differs from W. tedfordi in: tarsometatarsus with (i) sulcus extensorius shallower; (ii) plantarly, rounded ligamental scar between trochleaemetatarsi II and IV deeper and closer to foramen vasculare distale; (iii) fossa metatarsi nearly absent. Carpometacarpus with (iv) synostosis metacarpalis distalis proximodistally shorter; (v) facies articularisdigitalis minor projecting further distally.

Remarks added by me: Announced in 2016; the correction including the required ZooBank accession number was published in 2020, but I cannot find the ZooBank accesion number.

Figure 1. Postcranial elements of Wilaru tedfordi (a–d,g,k–m,q,s–w) and W. prideauxi sp. nov. (i, j) from the late Oligocene and early Miocene of Australia in comparison to Presbyornis pervetus (e,f,h,n–p,r,x) from the early Eocene of North America. (a,b) Left humerus of W. tedfordi (holotype SAM P.48925) in cranial and caudal views; (c) proximal left humerus (paratype AMNH 1151) of W. tedfordi in caudal view; (d) distal left humerus (paratype AMNH 11452) of W. tedfordi in caudal view. (e) Proximal left and distal left, (f ) humerus of P. pervetus in caudal (USNM 618204) and cranial (USNM 618180) views, respectively. (g) Right scapula (AMNH 10989) of W. tedfordi in lateral view; (h) left scapula of P. pervetus (USNM 618223) in medial view. (i,j) Right coracoid of W. prideauxi sp. nov (paratype SAM P.23625) in dorsal and ventral views. (k) Left coracoid (AMNH 11426) of W. tedfordi in ventral view; (l,m) left coracoid, omal extremity (AMNH 11473) of W. tedfordi in dorsal andmedial views. (n, o, p) Left coracoid of P. pervetus in ventral (USNM 618183), dorsomedial (USNM 616565) and medial (USNM 616565) views. (q) Left femur (AMNH 11439) of W. tedfordi in cranial view; (r) right femur of P. pervetus (USNM 618228) in cranial view. (s,t) Left distal femur (AMNH 11444) of W. tedfordi in caudal and cranial views. (u) Left distal (AMNH 10995) and (v) right proximal (AMNH 11457) ulna of W. tedfordi in caudal and ventral views. (w) Distal right tibiotarsus (AMNH 11440) of W. tedfordi in cranial view. (x) Distal right tibiotarsus of P. pervetus (USNM 618236) in cranial view. Abbreviations: acr, acromion; aicd, impressio ansae m. iliofibularis, pars caudalis; aicr, impressio ansae m. iliofibularis, pars cranialis; cbc, crista bicipitalis; cdf, crus dorsale fossae; cdl, condylus lateralis; cdm, condylusmedialis; cdp, crista deltopectoralis; cs, cotyla scapularis; ctd, cotyla dorsalis; dep, depression; epm, epicondylus medialis; fac, facies articularis clavicularis; fah, facies articularis humeralis; fic, fossa at incisura capitis; flcv, facet for lig. collat. ventrale; fmb, fossa m. brachialis; fns, foramen nervi supracoracoidei; fpt, fossa pneumotricipitalis; ftr, fossa trochanteris; ibr, impressio brachialis; ic, incisura capitis; icb, impressio coracobrachialis; ila, impressio lig. acrocoracohumeralis; int, incisura tendinosa; ir, incisura radialis; isc, impressio m. sternocoracoidei; ldc, scar for m. latissimus dorsi caudalis; lic, linea intermuscularis cranialis; ltr, lateral tuberositas retinaculi extensoris; mc, margo caudalis; mps, scar for m. pronator superficialis; nfo, nutrient foramen; not, notch; pcd, processus cotylaris dorsalis; pfl, processus flexorius; ppc, processus procoracoideus; rid, ridge; sct, sulcus scapulotricipitalis; shc, scar for m. scapulohumeralis cranialis; slt, sulcus lig. transversus; smf, sulcus m. fibularis; ssc, sulcus m. supracoracoidei; tbd, tuberculum dorsale; tc, tuberculum carpale; tfb, trochlea fibularis; tgl, tuberculum m. gastrocnemialis lateralis; tgm, tuberculum m. gastrocnemialis medialis; tlcv, tuberculum lig. collateralis ventrale; tsd, tuberculum supracondylare ventrale; tvc, tuberculum coracoideum; vf, ventral fossa. Scale bar is 10 mm. (c–f ,l–m,o–p,u–x) not to scale.

Enjoy,

Fred
 

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Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Quote: "Remarks added by me: Announced in 2016; the correction including the required ZooBank accession number was published in 2020, but I cannot find the ZooBank accesion number."

That is correct, I did not find the correction, but just the original paper.

Here is the correction:

Vanesa L. De Pietri, R. Paul Scofield, Nikita Zelenkov, Walter E. Boles and Trevor H. Worthy, 2020

Correction to ‘The unexpected survival of an ancient lineage of anseriform birds into the Neogene of Australia: the youngest record of Presbyornithidae’

R. Soc. Open Sci. 7: 201430.

Free pdf: https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/pdf/10.1098/rsos.201430

This publication was not registered with Zoobank. Because the work must be registered in Zoobank before it is published [1], the name Wilaru prideauxi found in De Pietri et al. [2] was unavailable. This correction has been issued to rectify this omission and make the name available in terms of nomenclature and provide the following Registration Zoobank ID: urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:1BF287FE-4D10-4E22-A0C5-9CC0126EA259.

Description and comparisons for this taxon can be found in De Pietri et al. [2].

Wilaru prideauxi sp. nov.
Zoobank ID: urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:FE6BAC76-C919-4F56-A847-7CA3CA96F290

Holotype: Right tarsometatarsus SAM P.53136 (formerly UCMP 108052) (figures in De Pietri et al. [2]).

Type locality and age: Leaf Locality, Lake Ngapakaldi, South Australia (UCMP locality V6213); Wipajiri Formation; Kutjamarpu Local Fauna; ca 23.4–22 Ma.

Etymology: After vertebrate palaeontologist Gavin Prideaux (1969–), who has worked extensively on Oligo-Miocene mammalian faunas from South Australia, including the formations bearing fossils of species of Wilaru.

Differential diagnosis: Only slightly larger than Wilaru tedfordi but considerably stouter (figs 1 and 2 in De Pietri et al. [2]). Differs from W. tedfordi in: tarsometatarsus with (i) sulcus extensorius shallower; (ii) plantarly, rounded ligamental scar between trochleae metatarsorum [note this term is here corrected from ‘metatarsi’ in De Pietri et al. [2] II and IV deeper and closer to foramen vasculare distale; (iii) fossa metatarsi nearly absent. Carpometacarpus with (iv) synostosis metacarpalis distalis proximodistally shorter; (v) facies articularis digitalis minor projecting further distally. Remarks: For description, comparisons and figures, see De Pietri et al. [2]. Note also that the caption of figure 1 in De Pietri et al. [2] erroneously states that figure 1d, a distal left humerus (paratype AMNH 11452) of W. tedfordi Boles, Finch, Hofheins, Vickers-Rich, Walters, & Rich, 2013, is shown in caudal view. It is shown in cranial view.

Acknowledgements. We thank Leo Joseph (Australian NationalWildlife Collection) for bringing this matter to our attention.

References

1. International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature. 2012 Amendment of Articles 8, 9, 10, 21 and 78 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature to expand and refine methods of publication. Zootaxa 3450, 1–7 (doi:10.11646/zootaxa.3450.1.1)

2. De Pietri VL, Scofield RP, Zelenkov N, Boles WE, Worthy TH. 2016 The unexpected survival of an ancient lineage of anseriform birds into the Neogene of Australia: the youngest record of Presbyornithidae range. R. Soc. Open Sci. 3, 150635. (doi:10.1098/rsos.150635) royalsocietypublishing.org/journal/rsos R. Soc. Open Sci. 7: 201430

Sorry for the mistake,

Fred
 

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