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Your favourite books of 2018 (1 Viewer)

Melanie

Well-known member
Initially I've thought I could make a Top 10. But therefore that I've bought more than 10 interesting books this year my list is somewhat longer:

Birds New to Science: This book includes all newly described bird species from the early 1960s to the 2010s. Very detailed accounts, great photographic material and even some undescribed species are mentioned.

Vanished and Vanishing Parrots: This book was published in 2017. Parrot expert Joseph Michael Forshaw compiled a very comprehensive account on the demise of the Parrots including all recently extinct species and a chapter on subfossil parrots. Frank Knight provided excellent artwork.

Field Guide to the Birds of Indonesia: This book was published in 2016. The authors compiled the most comprehensive field guide of the Indonesian avifauna so far.

Handbook of Western Palearctic Birds (2-Volume Set): The most awaited and also most hyped bird book of 2018. Excellent photographic work and detailed descriptions.

Antpittas and Gnateaters: First photographic and very detailed account of these highly interesting bird families.

Handbook of the Mammals of the World 8: The penultimate volume of the HMW series with great photographic material.

The Night Parrot: The first ever book of the Night Parrot with very detailed texts by the great Penny Olsen and excellent photographic material. Contender of the Whitley Award (Australia) 2019 and for me the best zoological book of the year.

A Bat's End: An investigative book on the demise of the Christmas Island fauna, in particular of the Christmas Island pipistrelle.

Photographers against Wildlife Crime: A coffee-table book with thought-provoking photographes that are nothing for weak nerves.

End of the Megafauna: What causes the extinction of the Megafauna in the Pleistocene and the early Holocene. Men, Climate Change or something else? Ross D. E. MacPhee is searching for answers. With excellent artwork by Peter Schouten.

Smilodon: The Iconic Sabertooth: The most comprehensive book on the fiercest cat that ever lived on this planet. With highly interesting x ray photographes of the skull and the teeth.

Vaquita: Science, Politics, and Crime in the Sea of Cortez: A sad and investigative account on the extinction of the Vaquita.

Walker's Mammals of the World: The first new book of this series after 1999. This time with color photographes but also with detailed accounts.

Monument for the Quagga: Published in 2016. I've bought this book twice. The Dutch print edition with illustrations and photographes and the English text edition without photographes and illustrations as ebook.

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Out of competion because I still have to wait on this book: Grasswrens: Australian Outback Identities.
 
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Murray Lord

Well-known member
While I have only skimmed this book so far, it looks excellent and deserves a nomination:

Ornithology, Foundation, Analysis, and Application edited by Michael L. Morrison, Amanda D. Rodewald, Gary Voelker, Melanie R. Colón, and Jonathan F. Prather
 

Andrea Collins

Beside the Duddon, Cumbria
Supporter
England
"Scotland - A Rewilding Journey" Susan Wright, Peter Cairns and Nick Underdown.
"Abernethy Forest - The History and Ecology of an Old Scottish Pinewood" Ron W Summers.
"Exploring Britain's Hidden World - A Natural History of Seabed Habitats" - Keith Hiscock.
"Gulls of the World - A Photographic Guide" Klaus Malling Olsen.
"To the Ends of the Earth - Ireland's Place in Bird Migration" Anthony McGeehan.
 
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alan kennedy

Well-known member
Mark Cocker 'Our Place'
Joe Shute 'A Shadow Above'
Tim Dee 'Landfill'
Michael Brooke 'Far From Land'
Tim Birkhead 'The Wondrful Mr Willughby'
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Out of competion because I still have to wait on this book: Grasswrens: Australian Outback Identities.

My copy arrived today. And now it is official on my favourite book list and a Christmas gift for myself.
 
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aeshna5

Well-known member
Handbook of Western Palearctic birds (2 volume set)

Gulls of the world- Klaus Malling
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Field Guide to Ladybirds of GB + Ireland- Helen Roy with Lewington's superb plates. Good to see all the tiny species ignored by general insect guides.

The Grasshoppers of Greece- Willemse et al. Useful for Balkans trips

Climate change + British Wildlife- Trevor Beebee

New Naturalist- the Hedgehog- Pat Morris

New Naturalist- the Burren by David Cabot/ Roger Goodwillie

Wildlife of Madeira +Canary Islands- John Bowler As well as the birds which are well covered elsewhere there are mammals (including cetaceans/bats), reptiles, butterflies + dragonflies.

Wilding- Isabella Tree

Crossbill Guides- Dordogne
 

Melanie

Well-known member
My last new book for 2018:

Daniel Lewis: Belonging on an Island. Birds, Extinction, and Evolution in Hawai'i

A very interesting account on two extinct birds (the Moa Nola, and the Kauai 'o'o), one critically endangered bird (the Palila) and one introduced bird (the Japanese White-eye). There is also a chapter on the paleoornithological exploration on Hawaii from Alan Ziegler to Olson & James.
 

MJB

Well-known member
My last new book for 2018:

Daniel Lewis: Belonging on an Island. Birds, Extinction, and Evolution in Hawai'i

A very interesting account on two extinct birds (the Moa Nola, and the Kauai 'o'o), one critically endangered bird (the Palila) and one introduced bird (the Japanese White-eye). There is also a chapter on the paleoornithological exploration on Hawaii from Alan Ziegler to Olson & James.

IOC9.1 draft includes many whiteeye splits, many from the overlumped Japanese White-eye. Is there any indication of the origin(s) of the introduced Hawai'i 'Japanese' White-eye population...?
MJB
 

Swissboy

Sempach, Switzerland
Supporter
Switzerland
IOC9.1 draft includes many whiteeye splits, many from the overlumped Japanese White-eye. Is there any indication of the origin(s) of the introduced Hawai'i 'Japanese' White-eye population...?
MJB

The Hawaii Audubon Society's booklet "Hawaii's Birds" simply states "Introduced from Japan to O'ahu in 1929 and to Hawai'i in 1937".
 

MJB

Well-known member
The Hawaii Audubon Society's booklet "Hawaii's Birds" simply states "Introduced from Japan to O'ahu in 1929 and to Hawai'i in 1937".

Thanks for that. Thanks also to Melanie for supplying the Wikipedia entry, which gives as the reason for its introduction the control of agriculutral insect pest species, and emphasises the species' role in spreading avian malaria into native species habitats, especially when lateral introductions were made to the other islands.
MJB

**I'm assuming that 1937 reference is to 'Big Island' only...
 

Swissboy

Sempach, Switzerland
Supporter
Switzerland
………...
**I'm assuming that 1937 reference is to 'Big Island' only...

That is the way it must be meant, I'm sure. It's always a bit confusing to have a geographic designation used in two considerably different meanings.
 

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