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Your most anticipated futures books (9 Viewers)

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Mine weren’t a set, but were my first three.
I think we've been privileged to live through what have been the halcyon days for field guides and handbooks. No previous generation has had so much information at their fingertips or such quality illustrations to help with ID. I think though, that now, we may be witnessing the begining of the end for hard copy as more and more publications are available electronically, it will be a sad day when the last book is printed.
 

Swissboy

Sempach, Switzerland
Supporter
Switzerland
I think we've been privileged to live through what have been the halcyon days for field guides and handbooks. No previous generation has had so much information at their fingertips or such quality illustrations to help with ID. I think though, that now, we may be witnessing the begining of the end for hard copy as more and more publications are available electronically, it will be a sad day when the last book is printed.
I certainly agree with you. For my first trip to Costa Rica in 1971, there was simply nothing except a heavy book with descriptions that was also out of print. And the next best books with at least some plates were one for Guatemala by Hugh Land (1970), and De Schauensee for South America. Simply terrible. The first book with halfway decent plates appeared in 1972. But the author L. Irby Davis used his own names and splits (when they were not yet fashionable) that the book became very difficult to use together with others like those for Mexico and even the US. The attached scan shows how one had to deal with the difficulties, but also the relatively good quality of the illustrations.

As for books disappearing completely, I don't think they will. Electronics change so much that way too much knowledge would get lost. We'd then live with always just the preserved knowledge of maybe the last twenty to thirty years, I'm afraid.
 

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Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
Yeah....I don't think books are going away, although I fear bookstores might be. We physical book collectors are probably going to be a more niche group than in the past though.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Yeah....I don't think books are going away, although I fear bookstores might be. We physical book collectors are probably going to be a more niche group than in the past though.
I've used the same seller for about 25 years and only if they can't get something, do I resort to other sources.
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
I've used the same seller for about 25 years and only if they can't get something, do I resort to other sources.
We have one local "regular" bookstore, and it's a chain, and it's actually the next town over, so about a 30 minute drive. I try whenever possible to buy books in person there, but other than the super popular guides (like Nat Geo or Sibley), they seldom have much of a selection of natural history related books.

I wish I lived in a place with more bookstores...I love spending a rainy weekend day browsing the stacks.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Since 2002 I have mainly lived in countries where "bookstore" equals a place to purchase schoolbooks for kids. Without online purchases I would have been completely lost.

Niels
 

RafaelMatias

Unknown member
Portugal
Has anyone seen any illustrations from the forthcoming Birds of Chile? The cover has been revealed, but the sample pages are from the Jaramillo field guide, not from the new one: https://www.nhbs.com/birds-of-chile-book
The Jaramillo book was quite good IMO, this new one will have to be much better to be a real option?
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Since 2002 I have mainly lived in countries where "bookstore" equals a place to purchase schoolbooks for kids. Without online purchases I would have been completely lost.

Niels
You should visit the British Birdwatching Fair at some point, there are numerous booksellers who have stands there though they tend to be pricey. They carry a good range of books including antiquarian and some that are hard to get.
 

Swissboy

Sempach, Switzerland
Supporter
Switzerland
You should visit the British Birdwatching Fair at some point, there are numerous booksellers who have stands there though they tend to be pricey. They carry a good range of books including antiquarian and some that are hard to get.
All depends how much of a book collector one really is. I for one am mostly interested in new FGs now. I feel like at my age (78) I should rather sell than buy anyway. But in most ways, I have pretty much been in a situation like Niels here in Switzerland. It is easy to find the books I need/want as long as they are written in German. But for the ones in English (by far the majority for me), the Internet has long been the best/often only way to go.
 

bonxie2003

Going for the One
Supporter
United Kingdom
I’ve just ordered ATBOTW. It hasn’t arrived yet, but I am looking forward to it. I don’t have the two volume, so this is a step into the unknown. Having read other reviews, I don’t envisage using it as a first stop identification guide, so the index, or lack of, doesn’t really bother me. I simply want to wallow in it and try and avoid getting suffocated by it as I fall asleep in bed.

As for Seabirds, I can’t wait. The first edition was my very first Helm guide and it still holds up well on my bookshelf.
ATBOTW has arrived. It’s awesome. Definitely not a field guide. The vast majority is replicated, and more, online. But to have it in front of you is fantastic. And so far after a quick flick through, the quality is great. None of the criticisms from earlier reviews. I love just losing myself in it.
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Has anyone seen any illustrations from the forthcoming Birds of Chile? The cover has been revealed, but the sample pages are from the Jaramillo field guide, not from the new one: https://www.nhbs.com/birds-of-chile-book
The Jaramillo book was quite good IMO, this new one will have to be much better to be a real option?

I've not seen much about this, honestly. I agree that Alvaro's book is excellent and particularly with the thorough taxonomic notes that were included, it's taxonomy is still quite accurate / relevant. There are going to be very few changes of note - some range adjustments in the north, bringing pelagic bird distribution up to date, perhaps a little more up to date information on the ID of Peruvian Sheartail vs Chilean Woodstar. I'm sure there are a few other things that will have changed but it's hard to imagine major improvements over what is still a pretty gold standard guide?
 

RafaelMatias

Unknown member
Portugal
I've not seen much about this, honestly. I agree that Alvaro's book is excellent and particularly with the thorough taxonomic notes that were included, it's taxonomy is still quite accurate / relevant. There are going to be very few changes of note - some range adjustments in the north, bringing pelagic bird distribution up to date, perhaps a little more up to date information on the ID of Peruvian Sheartail vs Chilean Woodstar. I'm sure there are a few other things that will have changed but it's hard to imagine major improvements over what is still a pretty gold standard guide?
Yep. Among the possible improvements must be the inclusion of the 'newly' described endemic Pincoya Storm-petrel.
 

Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
Hey guys, is Handbook of Bird Families by Elphik a decent textual addition to All The Birds Of The World? It's quite a bit more affordable than the Lynx "Bird Families of the World" but tempted by that too. But that one almost looks superfluous? As said, mainly looking for a textual addition to ATBOTW explaining the typical behavior, habitat etc of all the different bird families.
 
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Melanie

Well-known member
No one, anyone? :unsure:
Well, it depends how you define textual addition. There are entries on Length, Weight, World Range and Habitat, Social Behaviour, Nest, Incubation, Fledging Period, Food, Voice, Migration, Conservation status in the Elphick book. And then it depends on the family: There are families (e.g. Tyrannids) that have some more text and than there are families which have rather less text (e.g. Seriemas)
 
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Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
Thanks, Melanie. I read in an earlier post you know both books? Which do you find most informative, is there a big difference? I don't need too much visuals in it, I'll have the All Birds Of The World for that.
 
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Melanie

Well-known member
Thanks, Melanie. You are referring to the Elphick? I read in an earlier post you know both books? Which do you find most informative, is there a big difference? I don't need too much visuals in it, I'll have the All Birds Of The World for that.
Bird Families of the World is more informative, as the Elphick book did not recognize new families like Modulatricidae
 

Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
Thanks, Melanie. Scouring for reviews on both, I also found this quote as conclusion, from Bob Curry in The Canadian Field-Naturalist:

In summary, this book provides a 2018 snapshot of ornithological thinking about world bird families. Unfortunately, in this reviewer’s opinion the work cut too many corners perhaps based on space and time restrictions. At 35.00 CAD it is likely worth the cost but the Bird Families of the World (Lynx Edicions, 2015), while slightly older and thus not as up-to-date as the present volume, would still be a better purchase at 87 Euros for most birders seriously interested in bird families.

Seems I need to lay in another few tens of euros for granted gratification...
 

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