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Your most anticipated futures books (2 Viewers)

Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
I've just received Lynx's All The Bird Of The World. First I must say I enjoyed the packaging; that internal box containing the book, with the Lynx name stamped out, is a beautiful design, never seen such beautiful packaging before. The whole gigantic thing was very well packed. Contents, marvelous. What an abundant wealth. I find the contents menu just fine, register as well. The maps are tiny but still good enough to make out general regions. When it's hard to see arrows are added and countries are marked by their ID letters, to be found on the laminated card with the book. No complaints here, a fantastic and gigantic book to browse through and enjoy all the bird beauty of our planet.

Elphicks "Handbook of Bird Families" seems quite a nice addition. Have thus far only peaked in it, but filled from front to cover with enough info on every family to get an indication of how they behave and what sets them apart. It's enough for me to browse ATBOTW with and get to know global birdlife.

Very happy with this set! Especially Lynx's monster is something I'm somewhat proud to own!
 

aeshna5

Well-known member
Excited at the publication in May (currently) of Grasshoppers of Britain & Western Europe. A much needed guide to Orthoptera in English for across the channel. There are good English guides to Italy & to Greece but otherwise a big void.
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
I've just received Lynx's All The Bird Of The World. First I must say I enjoyed the packaging; that internal box containing the book, with the Lynx name stamped out, is a beautiful design, never seen such beautiful packaging before. The whole gigantic thing was very well packed. Contents, marvelous. What an abundant wealth. I find the contents menu just fine, register as well. The maps are tiny but still good enough to make out general regions. When it's hard to see arrows are added and countries are marked by their ID letters, to be found on the laminated card with the book. No complaints here, a fantastic and gigantic book to browse through and enjoy all the bird beauty of our planet.

Elphicks "Handbook of Bird Families" seems quite a nice addition. Have thus far only peaked in it, but filled from front to cover with enough info on every family to get an indication of how they behave and what sets them apart. It's enough for me to browse ATBOTW with and get to know global birdlife.

Very happy with this set! Especially Lynx's monster is something I'm somewhat proud to own!
I got my copy of All the Birds of the world the other day. I love scrolling through it and seeing the variation within different genera. You really get to appreciate the diversity present in birds in a way that a list of names doesn't provide.
 

Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
Excited at the publication in May (currently) of Grasshoppers of Britain & Western Europe. A much needed guide to Orthoptera in English for across the channel. There are good English guides to Italy & to Greece but otherwise a big void.
First I was excited by that one as well but I found an oop big book in Dutch by Roy Kleukers e.a. which serves me well alongside two field guides :) in total two cd's with sound recordings accompanying them
 

Surreybirder

Ken Noble
All the Birds of the World arrived in beautiful condition about four weeks after I ordered it. It's a beautiful tome. It must weigh at least 5 kgs so not for people with bad backs! It compares the four main global 'lists' so it's easy to see what potential splits and lumps there might be. For example, three of the lists separate green-winged and Eurasian teal, so that it a likely future split for eBird (the list I use).

One of the things that I like is that you can compare birds that you are highly unlikely to see together in life - grey heron and great blue heron, for example. When I see GBH in America I always think that it looks just like a grey heron - but this book enables you to see the rather richer colours on GBH (not grievous bodily harm!) The illustrations seem to be very good throughout although I haven't had time to study every species by any means. At the moment Lynx are doing an introductory offer (Euros 65 + 10 for tracked delivery).
 

Melanie

Well-known member
The sample pages of Lynx's Birds of Columbia are online. I wonder that Niceforo's wren and Antioquia wren almost look the same.
 

RafaelMatias

Unknown member
Portugal
Birds of Chile (Martínez Piña & González Cifuentes)

Has anyone seen any illustrations from the forthcoming Birds of Chile? The cover has been revealed, but the sample pages are from the Jaramillo field guide, not from the new one: https://www.nhbs.com/birds-of-chile-book
The Jaramillo book was quite good IMO, this new one will have to be much better to be a real option?

I've not seen much about this, honestly. I agree that Alvaro's book is excellent and particularly with the thorough taxonomic notes that were included, it's taxonomy is still quite accurate / relevant. There are going to be very few changes of note - some range adjustments in the north, bringing pelagic bird distribution up to date, perhaps a little more up to date information on the ID of Peruvian Sheartail vs Chilean Woodstar. I'm sure there are a few other things that will have changed but it's hard to imagine major improvements over what is still a pretty gold standard guide?

Some pages and plates now visible in the NHBS website: https://www.nhbs.com/de/birds-of-chile-pina-cifuentes-book

My comments refer only to the sample pages of the book, so I'm not sure my perception would change if I had seen the full book in detail.
The visible plates look nice, but I'm not sure they're an improvement from the Jaramillo guide. The text (species accounts) looks a bit unnecessarily too concise (given Chile has a relatively limited avifauna), to the point identification seems not to be detailed and really well addressed. Looking at the skuas plate, which looks nice (with the fluffy chicks shown as well) as all others in the samples, I feel a bit 'more' could have been done there; Jaramillo has 2 plates for all skuas, whilst only 1 is presented in the new guide. It seems striking that some range of plumage variation is illustrated for South Polar and Chilean Skuas, but Brown skuas are shown in only one adult plumage, suggesting the species is not variable, which is a shame. They do have notable variation (not to the point of South Polar though), with individuals having a degree of rufous patches (possibly from introgression with Chilean Skua) and the central tail feathers can show a confusing long projection (in some individuals increasing tail length by one third!). These issues should have been addressed in a field guide intended to be actually useful and functional. Jaramillo actually shows the two subspecies of Brown Skua in the region (Falklands: nominate antarcticus, and Antarctica: lonnbergi) with both separate illustrations and text for each, whereas all are lumped in the new guide with a minimal text.

I like that distribution maps show the species' distributions beyond Chilean borders (the Jaramillo maps had distribution only to the borders of Chile); however, again focusing on Brown Skua, the map (and text) seems to omit the huge Falklands population (but the resolution in the samples page is quite low, so I may be missing something), with the species shown as breeding only in the Antarctic Peninsula from where it migrates north (if so that's a major mistake in the book).

From what I can see, not very impressive (and difficult to classify as an improvement from the Jaramillo guide), but I'd say still interesting for everyone interested in the avifauna of that region.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Birds of Chile (Martínez Piña & González Cifuentes)



I like that distribution maps show the species' distributions beyond Chilean borders (the Jaramillo maps had distribution only to the borders of Chile); however, again focusing on Brown Skua, the map (and text) seems to omit the huge Falklands population (but the resolution in the samples page is quite low, so I may be missing something), with the species shown as breeding only in the Antarctic Peninsula from where it migrates north (if so that's a major mistake in the book).

From what I can see, not very impressive (and difficult to classify as an improvement from the Jaramillo guide), but I'd say still interesting for everyone interested in the avifauna of that region.
This is because it doesn't cover the Falklands, it only covers Chilean territory, dosn't include South Georgia either for the same reason.

Note the 'where to see' text in each account which I think is a really usefull inclusion and the weak colours on the plates, are the result of my ineptitude in setting the camera.

Any requests for plates?
 

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Swissboy

Sempach, Switzerland
Supporter
Switzerland
A new in-depth, two-volume photo ID guide to European birds is in the works: https://www.dutchbirding.nl/dbactueel/1703/request_for_images_for_new_photographic_id_guide

Another Southern Africa Photographic Guide to look forward to:


Due out this year. NHBS are saying May, but amazon.co.uk web site saying December...

I can't help myself for thinking these are essentially some more of the same, excuses trying to park some good photos. But whether these books fulfill a great need by filling some voids like FGs for some areas of South America, I doubt it.
 

James Lidster

Well-known member
I can't help myself for thinking these are essentially some more of the same, excuses trying to park some good photos. But whether these books fulfill a great need by filling some voids like FGs for some areas of South America, I doubt it.
I think the double photo ID book by Nils van Duivendijk (at least when there is an English version) will be as important as the Collins and Shirihai and Svensson for those interested in bird ID.
cheers
James
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Birding in an Age of Extinctions by Martin Painter

scheduled for June 2021


This is a book about what it’s like being a birder in an age of natural decline. It is part autobiographical – tales of spell-binding birding encounters that left indelible memories – and it is part reflective. The travellers’ tales of birding adventures are about places and events that were variously entertaining, amusing, captivating, inspiring, exciting and awesome, literally. They also feature the amazing, eccentric, dedicated, inspiring people in the birding community. Travels to Madagascar, Cambodia, India and many other places are recalled. There is birding in the Himalayas, in the Australian outback, on the Southern Oceans and in hotel gardens and city parks and there are tales of the ‘big listers’, ‘big-lensers’, professional guides, and local conservation workers who try to keep their habitats safe for us. There are lots of images to accompany these stories.

Martin’s experiences in becoming a birder late in life revealed some strange behaviour which he soon learnt to take for granted as a member of the birding community. Why tear off chasing the next tick when we were having such a good time in the forest we were already exploring? Why was seeing a rare parrot in a cage less significant than seeing a ‘wild’ one that was being hand-fed in a nature reserve? Why was he visiting all those rubbish tips and sewerage farms in search of birds when birding excursions to a forest or a natural wetland were so much more pleasing?
 

John Cantelo

Well-known member
A newly published book "Invasive Birds: Global Trends and Impacts" (CABI 400pp) looks fascinating but at a prohibitive price I doubt it will have the readership it deserves. It's listed at £135 on several sites (although Amazon has it down for £95.36 and, bizarrely, a Kindle edition at £108). For a 'Look Inside' see here One, I fear, for academic libraries, but it would be good to see a popular version at a much lower price.
 

Jim Martin

Friend of the auk
Excited at the publication in May (currently) of Grasshoppers of Britain & Western Europe. A much needed guide to Orthoptera in English for across the channel. There are good English guides to Italy & to Greece but otherwise a big void.

I got an advance copy yesterday. It's fantastic – witness my reaction here:


Publishing 10th June.
 

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