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Red-capped Robin - BirdForum Opus

Revision as of 12:56, 21 August 2023 by Deliatodd-18346 (talk | contribs) (→‎External Links)
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Male
Photo © by Weiss1
Hattah-Kulkyne, Australia, September 2010
Petroica goodenovii

Identification

11-12 cm
Male

  • Black upperparts
  • White underparts
  • Scarlet cap
  • White shoulders
  • Red breast
  • Black throat
  • White barring on wings
  • White edged black tail
Female
Photo © by feral
Mallee and Banksia areas, Australia, June 2009

Female:

  • Grey-brown upperparts
  • Whitish underparts
  • Brownish-black wings
  • Buff wing bars
  • May have faint red on the breast

Young birds: similar to females

  • Streaked white upperparts
  • Pale buff wing bar
  • Dark brown streaks on breasts and sides

Similar Species

Similar in morph and markings to all the other members of its genus, but P. multicolor is the only one with a red cap.

Distribution

Juvenile
Photo © by bazz
Mid north , South Australia, December 2011

This is the most widely distributed of the Petroica robins. Its range covers most of the lower two-thirds of Australia except close to the coastline; most common in Victoria and the southwest.

Taxonomy

This is a monotypic species[1].

Habitat

Tall trees or shrubs, such as eucalypt, acacia and cypress pine woodlands.

Behaviour

Diet

Its diet includes insects and other invertebrates. It is a ground feeder.

Breeding

It builds a cup-shaped nest of bark, grass, and rootlets. The male feeds the female during nest-building and incubation. The female incubates the eggs alone but both sexes feed the young.

References

  1. Clements, JF. 2011. The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World. 6th ed., with updates to August 2011. Ithaca: Cornell Univ. Press. ISBN 978-0801445019. Spreadsheet available at http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist/downloadable-clements-checklist
  2. Birds in Backyards

Recommended Citation

External Links

GSearch checked for 2020 platform.1

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