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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Blogs (29 Viewers)

Sonder is a small district town in Minahasa regency of Indonesia. It is surrounded by mountainous forest, hills, wetland (rice fields), and water streams. Ecologically, this is a good place for birding. Since March this year, I have done numerous exploratory birding trips in the forest, agricultural land, and terraces of paddy fields of District Sonder. In higher elevation forest, I saw a number of interesting species including the endemic ones. I went to the forest by motorcycle early in the morning at 06:00 and reached the top at around 06:15, the trees were still covered by fog. However, it did not take long for it to disappear. For birding, I only walked down the slope holding my binoculars and an old bridge camera - the Fujifilm...
Its that time of the birding year where I’ve had a go at all the plans I had made earlier in the year, and even the wildly ambitious ones set at the end of the previous year. I’ve ‘done’ the coast, ‘done’ woodland for migrants, picked up the expected birds by being out in general, and of course mumbled and moaned about not being out enough. Thus the urge to do something ‘big’ competed with the practicality of ‘what.’ I was lucky to have a full week off work, and very few plans in place. The possibilities for some damned good birding were there for the taking. Now avid readers will remember that I’m not a twitcher. I’m an ‘immerse yourself in the birding day’ kind of guy. This is partly due to my love of the purest form of birding, and...
Following my perfectly imperfect days out my weekends have slowed somewhat. I had a busy weekend doing other ‘stuff’ followed by the chance of working overtime over the next weekends being too good to resist. Petrol and train fares aren’t exactly cheap, and I’m in that awkward age- bracket where I’m too old and too young to qualify for a bus pass. The chance to work overtime and reduce the drain of my birding on the family finances couldn’t be ignored. Monday to Friday working was busy, and I’m now so used to the dawn chorus (including Mr Song Thrush) that it no longer wakes me up at silly o’clock. I know better than to take it for granted, as in a few short weeks it will fall silent. Like everything in the natural world, it follows...
A Tale About Storks – part 6 It took less than an hour to walk the circular route around the ‘colony’ of storks the next day. A bit of a grandiose term for three tree nests (and one nesting pole), but hey, one shouldn’t be too picky now. There they were: three big trees, with three large nests in them, all occupied by storks. Wonderful! Basking in glorious sunshine, the route took me right along the marshy, wet banks of the pretty river. Its mineral- and lime-rich water nurturing an abundance of typical seepage plants like marsh marigold, hollyhock, and meadowsweet. Happily splashing on bare feet through a stretch of ankle-deep, wet and muddy ground, I stopped to have a chat with an elderly gentleman in sensible, knee-high rubber...

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