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Shi Jin
Saturday 20th October 2012, 05:14
Please support this campaign to stop the trapping of birds in China

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/baohuniaolei.html

Shi Jin

MKinHK
Saturday 20th October 2012, 10:14
Great idea! It would be great for the local bird watching societies to publicise this, especially with a link to the relevant national and provincial legislation.

Cheers
Mike

Gretchen
Saturday 20th October 2012, 10:26
A Chinese friend mentioned a blog post with pictures of nets and trapped birds (don't think it was yours, Shi Jin). I've been trying to get her to send me the link, but it made quite a strong impression on her!

Shi Jin
Sunday 21st October 2012, 08:59
Great idea! It would be great for the local bird watching societies to publicise this, especially with a link to the relevant national and provincial legislation.

Cheers
Mike

Mike

That would be great.

Anything anyone reading this could do to make this happen would be highly appreciated.

Please note that the site is now in Chinese and English.

And now has accounts and photos of 6 "cases".

Contributions from local birders and photographers are urgently required.

The only way this site will make a difference is if it gets traction in local social media.

Best regards from Beijing.

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/baohuniaolei.html

thrush
Sunday 28th October 2012, 06:56
Please support this campaign to stop the trapping of birds in China

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/baohuniaolei.html

Shi Jin

Dear Shi Jin, I'm happy to have contributed a photo to your Web page.

Shi Jin
Monday 29th October 2012, 15:38
Thanks Craig

Appreciate your support. Thanks also to Jonathan, Tom, Nemo and the Migratory Birds Protection Group of Hunan Province.

The site has been recently updated and now also includes 17 links to articles from China's media concerning the crimes against birds and bird protection (15 of which were published in the past two weeks).

The tide is at last beginning to turn.

Cheers.


Shi Jin

thrush
Thursday 1st November 2012, 04:07
. . . The tide is at last beginning to turn. . . .

I wouldn't go that far. The tide COULD be turning, but we won't know for a while whether it's actually turned.

For now, let me paraphrase the great Ronald Reagan, in his speech in Berlin:

"Chinese Citizens: Tear Down Those Nets!"

Shi Jin
Thursday 1st November 2012, 08:59
Craig

We have different views on this. Funnily enough, I believe what I wrote to be accurate. Baidu or Google any combination of relevant words for the last 18 days and compare the results with any 12 month period since [search engine] records began and let's go offline to discuss.

In fact, I felt so upbeat about this, I wrote an article about it. It's called Finding Nemo, and can be read here: www.ChineseCurrents.com

In the meantime, if anyone has any photos and stories to share (or knows someone who has) please let me know.

Thanks.

thrush
Thursday 1st November 2012, 10:34
. . . I believe what I wrote to be accurate. . . .

And it may be accurate. And I want it so very much to be accurate.

Very good piece of writing about Nemo, Shi Jin. Very good indeed.

I very much appreciate your characterization of this current period as a kind of Dark Ages for Chinese birding, and for the environment in general. For example, here in Shanghai, a city of 20 million people (the size of a mid-sized European country), there may be a few hundred serious birders at most. I think I know just about all the major people on the Web site of the Shanghai Wild Bird Society.

In China, there is indifference bordering on hostility to the environment and wild animals. I find in many Chinese an old-fashioned, 19th-century-ish, adversarial attitude toward nature.

I'm not a student of the Cultural Revolution, but I have read a few books about it and seen a few movies. I'm wondering what effect the old "Kill the Sparrows!" campaign still has on the Chinese people. You know, that shameful event in Chinese history has never been repudiated. As far as I know, no one has stood up and said, "That was a disastrous mistake."

There are millions of people alive today who remember the "Kill the Sparrows!" campaign. They remember how the state, the most powerful element in society, ordered the people to commit a monstrous affront against nature.

Despite the lack of an official repudiation of "Kill the Sparrows," it may be possible for an environmental renaissance to occur in China. I myself, in my speeches to Chinese photographers and birders, have called on the Chinese to create a "Great Wall of the Environment"--that is, a national mobilization to save the environment on par with the national mobilization that created the Great Wall hundreds of years ago.

CJW
Thursday 1st November 2012, 10:49
Link posted to my Facebook page - might be an idea to start a page on there as well?

Dong Bei
Thursday 1st November 2012, 11:35
Excellent article Shi Jin!

MKinHK
Thursday 1st November 2012, 22:06
The persecution of birds was stopped by an ornithologist called Zheng Zuo Xin. He wrote a book called "The Economic Significance of Birds" which persuaded the senior leadership that the campaign was doing more harm than good.

Not surprisingly he was revered as the father of modern Chinese ornithology and shortly before his deth was honoured as President of the IOC.

He also wrote the Synopsis of the Avifauna of China - the first attempt to map the taxonomy and distribution of all the birds in China - and the foundational work that everything else is built from.

Cheers
Mike

Shi Jin
Friday 2nd November 2012, 00:50
Thanks Mike

That's really good to know. It's also very helpful. It's now clear what the title of the Chinese translation of my Finding Nemo article should be: Finding Comrade Zheng

Thanks also CJW (I can't access FB in China, but great to know it's on there)

And thanks to Dong Bei for contributing the kind of poignant image to the website that changes attitudes. If you haven't seen it do have a look here www.ChineseCurrents.com/baohuniaolei.html

For those whose Chinese is almost as bad as mine: baohu niaolei means protect [China's] birds.

A call to action if ever there was one.

thrush
Friday 2nd November 2012, 02:09
The persecution of birds was stopped by an ornithologist called Zheng Zuo Xin. . . .

Good to know. Gracias, Mike.

MKinHK
Friday 2nd November 2012, 05:08
A couple of articles from the online edition of the China Daily yesterday and today

Click here (http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/cndy/2012-11/01/content_15862477.htm)

and here (http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/xinhua/2012-11-01/content_7405188.html)

Cheers
Mike

Creba
Friday 2nd November 2012, 19:52
Netting migratory birds for consumption or pleasure, rare or not, is happening all over the Eurasian continent. Even in 'developed' Western Europe hunters in Spain, France and Italy catch and shoot illegally and legally, for food or just for fun, enormous amounts of birds migrating to Northern Europe and Russia and back to Africa. And no one in those countries with any power to change it seems to really care, even under pressure of 100.000's bird lovers (via petitions etc.). Wouldn't it be great if China would be faster in tackeling these outrages acts, being an example for the rest of the world?

Some other afwul news I received that may concern birders in China is the massive slaughter of Amur Falcons (+100000 per year!) in NE India. See more here (http://www.conservationindia.org/campaigns/amur-massacre) At least it is in the open now.


Many luck with all your actions.


Bart

Shi Jin
Saturday 3rd November 2012, 12:02
Thanks Mike and Creba

Creba, I like that thought. Nothing would shame certain European governments more than for China to be seen to be getting its bird-protection house in order.

Mike, thanks for the links. Brilliant stuff. We have a good friend, who's an editor of the China Daily. He was the one who managed to get an army platoon over to Tianjin to help a group of local heroes there pull up hundreds of metres of nets. He's also been spreading the word amongst his colleagues and associates. So much so that on Super Thursday (1st November), 6 (SIX!!) artcles were published in the China Daily in support of The Cause.

All the links to those articles (and many more supportive reports) are at the bottom of Baohu Niaolei (Protect [China's] Birds). The link is here: http://www.chinesecurrents.com/baohuniaolei.html

The tide is turning.

Shi Jin
Tuesday 6th November 2012, 15:53
The campaign continues to gather pace.

The media blitz in the English-language Chinese press was good to see, but of course counts for very little unless the issues are reported in the local media.

I am happy to report that the 护鸟 "bird protection" meme continues to be a hot topic. In the last 24 hours, there were 8 different reports (including an article in the People's Daily).

Also, Terry Townshend, of Birding Beijing fame ( http://birdingbeijing.com/ ) recently recorded an interview on Talking Naturally, in which he talks about illegal netting in China. It can be heard here:

http://www.talking-naturally.co.uk/tn100-terry-townshend-on-illegal-bird-trapping-in-china/#comment-8277

It's obviously a popular site, because I've spent a good part of the day posting supportive comments from listeners onto the baohuniaolei website:

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/Baohuniaolei.html


Best regards from Beijing

Shi Jin
Saturday 10th November 2012, 01:09
There have now been a couple of dozen messages of support from all over the world. These can be read on the comments page: http://www.chinesecurrents.com/comment.html

The Chinese-language news section yesterday received 150 unique visitors from mainland China: http://www.chinesecurrents.com/baodao.html

A TRANSLATED "pick of the day" has been added to the English-language Bird Protection News section:

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/news.html

There you can read the Tianjin Daily News report of the authorites' crackdown on the trading of wild birds (dead and alive) in Qilihai and nearby towns and counties. You can also read about Mr Zhang, who was a poacher at Dongting Lake in Hunan province, before he turned game keeper.

The "huniao" (protect birds) meme on Sina Weibo continues to gather pace: There are now 126,516 articles on the subject. More than double that of 20 days ago.

Warm regards from a cold and grey Beijing.

Shi Jin
Monday 12th November 2012, 07:51
Yesterday at Beidagang, in Tianjin, 38 Oriental White Storks were poisoned.

Sadly, 11 have died, and a further 27 have been affected.

Please go to the link below for the latest update.

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/news.html

There you can leave a message of support for the volunteers who are nursing the sick birds back to health, and who are continuing to scour the countryside looking for the birds that have dispersed from the site of the poisoning.

rockfowl
Monday 12th November 2012, 07:59
Good stuff Shi Jin!

Perhaps the campaign will also slow down the wealth of Chinese traders plying "died naturally" birds on ebay such as this character - http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/freegee/m.html?item=110974948040&_uhb=1&pt=UK_Collectables_AnimalCollectables_SM&hash=item19d69f52c8&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562

Have lots of images of nets/trapped/dead birds from Hebei should you need more ammunition.

Shi Jin
Monday 12th November 2012, 09:30
Thanks Mark

Bloody hell. That eBay site is like something from the 1800s.

Good luck on the campaign to get that closed down.

The Chinese equivalent, Taobao, may be a harder nut to crack.

It's a bird-trappers' emporium. I've got a dossier of screen-grabs that I'm going to circulate on my wife's weibo (Chinese twitter) for the next campaign.

Have a look at weibo, it's full of great stuff, and up to the minute campaigning from many activisits here.

Here's my wife's weibo:

http://weibo.com/huniao huniao = protect birds

If you go to those followed (not followers) - the one that has 51 entries, and click on the icons (excluding the news sites), you'll see the best of them.

Yes, I would very much like to put some of your net shots (including some "saved birds" shots if you have them) on to the Protecting birds in China webspace.

Thanks again Mark

rockfowl
Tuesday 13th November 2012, 08:20
Theres a piece of good publicity and news on the China Birding Facebook page -


Captive birds released,bird catchers caught,Xiang Yang City,China
Updated 16 hours ago
Last week, three bird lovers in Xiang Yang City alarmed the Forest Police that hundreds of wild Yellow-breasted Bunting (an endangered species), were caught.
The Forest Police and the volunteers took action and found the temporary location where the birds were held.
The bird catchers were caught and the captive birds were released to freedom.
The volunteers used the opportunity to explain to the public why these birds should be protected and not caught from the wild. - https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.4308240537618.165489.1034961836&type=1

Yellow-breasted appears to be on a noticeable decline judging by sightings on the East coast and numbers reported around Lake Baikal over the last decade or so.

Some more welcome news!

Shi Jin
Tuesday 13th November 2012, 08:26
Today's update on the poisoning of Oriental White Storks and many other birds is here.

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/news.html

This is not a chemical spill. Poachers are to blame.

Shi Jin
Tuesday 13th November 2012, 23:55
The news site below was updated last night with the report that another 6 birds were found dead. If it were not for the heroic efforts of the local volunteers however, this number could have been many times more.

Their discovery of poachers' "lure pools" is significant.

Details are here: http://www.chinesecurrents.com/news.html

china guy
Wednesday 14th November 2012, 07:26
Here's a shocker from my part of the woods - something I've been sitting on for the past 9 months!!!!
At Chengdu Airport the new runway has been surrounded by complete ring of mist nets - supposedly for bird protection. According to the airport website the runways are 3.6km long - that will give you a net running to almost 8 km in length!!!!! The picture was taken last march - you can see birds in the net. We haven't been back since - with the security patrols and local paranoia over terrorism, lurking on the edges of Chinese international airports with cameras is most likely highly illegal and not one of our favorite past-times!!!! We don't know if the nets are still up - but we strongly suspect they still are.
Those who read my posts know my usual course of action when confronted with a net - take action to destroy - but nets around airports are a far more difficult task. Forestry Protection Police and local NGO's are not wanting to get involved with the authorities who run international airports - since it's a 'legal' government birdnet - set in place with the misguided idea that this is the best way to prevent birdstrike!!!!
So what is the best way to tackle this horrible problem - anybody here know anybody who has the sufficient pull to advise the airport that there are alternative ways of keeping birds off runways, and that netting the area is regarded as so environmental unfriendly that it's a huge embarrassment for the airport - any ideas????


What a great campaign -

Gretchen
Wednesday 14th November 2012, 08:07
Hmm... seems there's someone who knows about airports, and might know how some really "modern" airports deal with birds ... Mike?

Shi Jin
Friday 16th November 2012, 09:27
That's a shocker of a report and photo from Sichuan.

I searched 飞机场 airport 捕鸟 bird-trapping and various combinations containing 网 net on the weibo of Chengdu Birdwatching Society 成都观鸟会 http://weibo.com/u/1133669242 and Chengdu migrant-bird protection group 让候鸟飞成都小分队 http://weibo.com/u/3070541625, but drew a blank. A key-word search of Sina Weibo also throws up nothing (but that doesn't mean that there wasn't stuff posted of course).

I think the best thing to do is to check with the local groups to find out what the situation is now (and, hopefully, when the policy changed).

If (God forbid) it's still going on, I sense that, because of the current mood and various other factors, it can be quickly stopped.

S.

Shi Jin
Friday 16th November 2012, 20:35
Here's the news for Friday, 16th November:

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/news.html

Thank you again for the many messages of support. I will try to get them all loaded onto the site by tomorrow.

Best regards from Beijing.

china guy
Sunday 18th November 2012, 12:57
Hi Shi Jin - Roland informed the Chengdu Birdwatching society, which is also linked to the Chengdu Migrant Protection Group, last year. I don't think they are able to do much in this situation.

So I've gone off on another tack - found the contact site of the manager of Chengdu Airport - on the airport English language site.
http://www.cdairport.com/front_en/zjlxx.jsp

This is the message I intend to send:

Dear Manager - a rather disturbing picture, from Chengdu Shuangli International Airport, has appeared on the internet showing that the airport has set up kilometers of birdnets around its perimeter.
You can find the picture here, at Birdforum, the world's largest bird watching site that has 118,000 members

http://www.birdforum.net/showpost.php?p=2589931&postcount=26

The picture shows dead birds hanging in the nets. This has caused shock - it is very disturbing that wild creatures, some of which maybe rare migrants, are allowed to die slowly in such an appalling way. This is an environmentally destructive method of coping with runway bird problems, and it does not reflect favorably with an image of a modern, progressive international airport.
Are the nets are still in place - if so I would be happy to advise on methods of bird control that do not involve killing, in a slow and horrible way, thousands of birds.


Unfortunately the message won't sent - arggggggggggggggggggghhhhhhhhh

I'll try again tomorrow - others are welcome to send a message

Shi Jin
Tuesday 20th November 2012, 15:38
Let's hope that the practice has been long-stopped.

If you would like me to arrange for the photo to be circulated on Sina weibo please let me know. I think it would horrify many people.

Shi Jin
Tuesday 20th November 2012, 15:38
All of the 13 Oriental White Storks in care continue to do well. The plan is to release them back into the wild tomorrow (Wednesday).

The details are here: http://www.chinesecurrents.com/news.html

Thank you again for your heart-warming comments in support of the volunteers who have made this possible.

So far 150 of them (those received by 7pm Beijing time, 11am GMT on Tuesday) have been loaded onto the site AND passed to the volunteers.

Please keep them coming!

Shi Jin
Wednesday 21st November 2012, 07:16
Great news.

At 10.25am local time today (2.25am GMT), all of the rescued storks took to the sky.

Details (as well as a dozen English-language news reports about the rescue mission and about the issues) are here:

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/news.html

If you would like to congratulate the volunteers who made this possible, you can also do so at the above.

Best regards from Beijing.

FXM
Wednesday 21st November 2012, 17:05
I'd like to congratulate the volunteers on here if I may. Great job. I'll do the same via the link.

china guy
Friday 23rd November 2012, 12:44
Please circulate the photo - and ask if anybody has seen the same at other airports.

It could also be pointed out that the kind of birds the nets stop would never cause an aircraft accident because they were far too small - which further underlines their horrific pointlessness!!!!

MKinHK
Saturday 24th November 2012, 11:19
Hi Gretchen

I've seen nets at other airports including Shenzhen - very depressing. HKIA certainly does not use nets

I'm trying to find out if I can do anything, but the wheels of bureaucracy turn slowly ...

In the meantime publicizing pictures like Sid's is definitely the way to go.

Cheers
Mike

Shi Jin
Sunday 25th November 2012, 05:29
Thanks Sid and Mike

I will circulate on Weibo and also copy the local groups.

I'll let you know what happens.

Shi Jin
Sunday 25th November 2012, 05:30
On Wednesday, shortly after the successful release of the 15 Oriental White Storks that had been nursed back to health, another two storks were found to be in difficulty, more than 100 miles along the coast (in "Happy Island" county).

Sadly, one later died. The translated report from Friday's edition of the Jinghua Times at the link below has the details.

Although describing how the volunteer rescue teams rushed from Tianjin and Beijing to help, it doesn't mention that Nemo was, again, leading the charge.

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/news.html

Shi Jin
Friday 30th November 2012, 17:03
Good news.

Two people have been arrested in connection with the poisoning to death of 22 Oriental White Storks in Beidagang, Tianjin.

The report is here: http://www.chinesecurrents.com/news.html

More good news is that there have been no more reports of poisoning there among the up to 350 Oriental White Storks and thousands of other birds that have migrated through the area in the past week.

The incident further along the coast, in Tangshan, that was reported one week ago (one Oriental White Stork died there) is still being investigated. No more deaths have been reported.

One final thing, the number of comments in praise of the remarkable work of the volunteers is stuck at around the 180 mark. If you have a moment, and haven't yet voiced your support, it would be great if you could help push the total over the 200 mark ;-)

Thanks to the volunteers, not only were 13 storks nursed back to health, but all the lure pools were found and made safe... before the arrival of 350 storks!

On behalf of Nemo and all of the volunteers, thank you so much for your support. It really does mean a lot.

rockfowl
Monday 3rd December 2012, 10:28
More proactive stuff -
Migratory birds packed in crates saved by railway police - http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/747801.shtml#.ULvvjXcQt3k.facebook

Frogfish
Saturday 8th December 2012, 03:25
More proactive stuff -
Migratory birds packed in crates saved by railway police - http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/747801.shtml#.ULvvjXcQt3k.facebook

Well retro-active but good to see ! I loved Hunan when I was in the Zhangjiajie area and was shocked to see how widesprread, and largescale, bird hunting is in this area.
Also this report on hunting (which would surely have benefits for birds) : http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/747019.shtml

On another note I was shocked to find 4 nets in Shanghai yesterday when I stopped the car for a quick loo break. I tore them down and threw the bamboo poles in a pond. I was only able to save 2 birds as the others, luckily - if that is the right word to use in this context - just a few, had died already.

It looks like maybe the nets had been emptied and re-erected recently or maybe, as the migration season has ended, there are just fewer birds around.

I will post a fuller report, and photos, in the Shanghai Perambulations thread within the next two days. Anyone is welcome to use these as they wish.

thrush
Sunday 9th December 2012, 00:40
I just read through some of the recent posts. Shocking. My modus operandi is to tear down the nets as soon as I see them--and I've seen many. I'll long remember the too silent forest in Mengsong, in Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Yunnan, on the border with Burma. In two days of birding in the forest there last winter, the largest bird I found was an Asian barred owlet. Hornbills? Forget it. Long since hunted out. My group found a net with a fulvetta in it; the fulvetta must have just been caught, because it flew away vigorously when we untangled it. I tore down the net with such passion that I cut my finger deeply. As an indication of the scale of the problem there, consider that the leader of our party, a Chinese bird expert, was initially reluctant even to tear down the net, lest he "alienate" the locals, whose "support" he needed for his research; I "compromised" with him, merely tearing down the net, ripping it to shreds, and burying it on the spot, rather than (as was my initial idea) carrying it openly into town for all the locals to see.

Gretchen
Monday 31st December 2012, 08:35
Shi Jin, wanted to let you know, when I needed a topic for students to practice writing articles and editorials on, I decided to present them with the Oriental White Stork Incident. Your site was a resource I suggested to them - nice to have a one-stop location for them to get info - so it turned out to be a nice resource for more than one purpose. I think the 20 of them learned a lot about storks and bird protection - and hopefully won't all groan at the mention of storks in the future :-O

Gretchen

Shi Jin
Tuesday 8th January 2013, 15:24
I'm just back to Beijng after a rather long and indulgent holiday in a well-known birding spot.

Despite the jet lag, I attended the Rang Houniao Fei conference in Beijing today.

It was a coming together of many of the key activists in the bird protection movement in China. Among the attendees were Li Feng, the Hunan photo-journalist who bravely exposed the Hunan shooting atrocities; Nemo, one of the Beidagang heroes who saved many Oriental White Storks; and Deng Fei, who does much great work for various charities in China, and is a powerful voice on bird protection issues.

I fervently hope that this event will be looked back on as the day that the national society for the protection of birds in China was officially launched.

With that in mind, here's wishing you all a very Happy New Year.

thirudevaram
Friday 11th January 2013, 01:46
Another distressing news from Jinshan district of Shanghai. I jus came across this in local forum. Who can put an end to this "Wild delicacy"? Even Yao ming and cheng long(Jackie Chan) are promoting to avoid the wild cuisine, the message has not reached many.

http://www.shwbs.org/swb/read.php?tid=7246

Shi Jin
Monday 14th January 2013, 02:52
Thanks Thirudevaram for posting photos of a vile practice.

On the subject of Shanghai, there is a very active local volunteer group that does great work in destroying many nets and making it harder for the people in the shots posted above to make a living.

But the main task is indeed education. As the ad campaign says, stop the buying and the killing will also stop.

Jeff hopkins
Monday 14th January 2013, 06:51
I spent the weekend birding with McMadd and Frogfish in the Poyang Hu area. On one of our walks, we actually saw a blackbird fly into a net. We rescued that bird and another, and destroyed the net as best we could. This is the first time I've enountered one of these things. What an awful practice!

Unfortunately, one other bird was already dead and a fourth probably was too damaged or stressed to survive even after we untangled it.

You do what you can.

JH

Shi Jin
Monday 14th January 2013, 09:39
Dusturbing news yesterday from Dongting Hu in Hunan province.

15 Bewick's Swans (among many other birds) were poisoned.

Details on my website: http://www.chinesecurrents.com/baohuniaolei.html

Shi Jin
Tuesday 15th January 2013, 00:13
I spent the weekend birding with McMadd and Frogfish in the Poyang Hu area. On one of our walks, we actually saw a blackbird fly into a net. We rescued that bird and another, and destroyed the net as best we could. This is the first time I've enountered one of these things. What an awful practice!

Unfortunately, one other bird was already dead and a fourth probably was too damaged or stressed to survive even after we untangled it.

You do what you can.

JH

Couldn't agree more Jeff... "You do what you can do".

You can see some overwhelmingly sad things here at times, but I take much heart from the young, local birders and their determination to make things a lot beter than they are presently.

rockfowl
Friday 18th January 2013, 16:09
An estimated 11.5 km of mist nets threatens waders including Spoon-billed Sandpipers! - http://www.birdlife.org/community/2013/01/shorebird-trapping-threatens-new-spoon-billed-sandpiper-wintering-site-in-china/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=shorebird-trapping-threatens-new-spoon-billed-sandpiper-wintering-site-in-china

Gretchen
Friday 18th January 2013, 23:09
Wow! I wonder if the Fujian and other bird societies are publicizing this on Chinese media - it seems this is the time to let people know while there has been a groundswell of interest in protecting birds.

MiguelM
Saturday 19th January 2013, 00:09
I'm sorry to say this and I'm also sorry if I offend any one, but chinese hunger for eating anything that moves, plus their traditional medicine usage of endagered animal parts and their totally disrespect for animal life, is ruining our planet 's wildlife biodiversity

AndrewHeath
Saturday 19th January 2013, 02:51
Poaching for Chinese markets is indeed a tremendous problem, MiguelM, but the species and populations that are most at risk under this threat are those whose habitats and lifestyles have already been heavily disrupted by local humans.

As an example, it is easy to get upset about elephants in Africa being wantonly slaughtered for ivory that is then sent back to China, but historically the local people and European traders/adventurers did far more damage to the original populations.

My point being, simply, that we all share blame.

Frogfish
Monday 21st January 2013, 06:59
Probably so Andrew but demand now is out of control and growing in line with the new found prosperity of the mainland.

Poisoning of ponds and lakes, mist nets covering hundreds of kms across the country (inc. many kms of nets on Poyang Lake), night hunting of large migrating birds with shotguns as sport.

Huge fishing fleets poaching around the world because seas close to China are virtually fished out.

100 million sharks per year is totally unsustainable and is going to irrevocably upset the balance of the eco-system within our oceans within just a few years.

Protected areas in such as the South Pacific and Eastern Pacific around the Galapagos Archipelago and Cocos Island (not that Chilean fishermen are any less to blame there) are being plundered and the eco-system destroyed.

That is before we even start on Panthera tigris, bears and ........ no need to go on, you know all this !

Shi Jin
Monday 28th January 2013, 05:46
Probably so Andrew but demand now is out of control and growing in line with the new found prosperity of the mainland.

Poisoning of ponds and lakes, mist nets covering hundreds of kms across the country (inc. many kms of nets on Poyang Lake), night hunting of large migrating birds with shotguns as sport.

Huge fishing fleets poaching around the world because seas close to China are virtually fished out.

100 million sharks per year is totally unsustainable and is going to irrevocably upset the balance of the eco-system within our oceans within just a few years.

Protected areas in such as the South Pacific and Eastern Pacific around the Galapagos Archipelago and Cocos Island (not that Chilean fishermen are any less to blame there) are being plundered and the eco-system destroyed.

That is before we even start on Panthera tigris, bears and ........ no need to go on, you know all this !

Yes I know this.

But, at long last, there is hope:

http://www.chinesecurrents.com/nemo.html

Li Feng (jpeg from the China daily below) is the inspiration for the Beidagang heroes.

These activists have, in turn, inspired many more groups up and down the country to get out there and tear down the nets, report poisoning incidents, take photos of illegal bird trading, lobby local government, demand action from the local forestry bureaus, name and shame culprits on weibo, etc, etc, etc...

Three weeks ago I attended a conference in Beijing to launch what is effectively the Chinese society for the protection of birds - 30 groups from all over China gathered to agree a plan of action under the organisation, Rang Hou Niao Fei.

But of course, the "fight-back" is just beginning.

And it's going to be a long, hard war.

But, thank goodness, there are increasing numbers of people up for the fight.

Best regards from Beijing.


Steve

thirudevaram
Monday 28th January 2013, 06:24
Hat's off to Li Feng. Not only for his heroic efforts in Hunan but for giving a bold comment like this.