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Locustellidae

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Old Tuesday 5th May 2015, 19:40   #26
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Sichuan Bush Warbler

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Perhaps ... chengi is rather too widespread to be named for Sichuan alone?
...the type locality is actually in Shaanxi.
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Old Tuesday 5th May 2015, 21:25   #27
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... to be named for Sichuan ...
I'd doubt very much that Sichuan is even in a position to make a request for the species to be so named. Surely it was named after Sichuan, not for it.
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Old Tuesday 5th May 2015, 22:29   #28
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I'd doubt very much that Sichuan is even in a position to make a request for the species to be so named.
Of course not, but it's a turn of phrase which seems to be used in these cases, in the sense of honoring the person (or location?) without a request to do so. I'm happy to agree that "named after" is equally appropriate (GMK may disagree ). Anyway thanks for your contribution.

cheers, a
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Old Thursday 7th May 2015, 13:34   #29
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HBW Alive

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Locustella chengi Alström et al has been added to the HBW Alive Recently described species and subspecies table (subscribers only), but has curiously been named 'Chinese Bush Warbler' (contra Alström et al's 'Sichuan Bush Warbler') – conflicting with Chinese Bush-warbler (Bradypterus tacsanowskius) (aka Locustella tacsanowskia).
Today renamed as Sichuan Bush Warbler.
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Old Saturday 9th May 2015, 21:43   #30
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Sichuan Bush Warbler

OBI: Sichuan Bush Warbler Locustella chengi. [10 images]
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Old Saturday 9th May 2015, 21:49   #31
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OBI need to update their family concepts . . . Locustella in "Acrocephalinae", how 1990s!
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Old Saturday 9th May 2015, 22:08   #32
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OBI need to update their family concepts . . . Locustella in "Acrocephalinae", how 1990s!
The classification appears to still follow Inskipp et al 1996 (An Annotated Checklist of the Birds of the Oriental Region), which largely follows Sibley & Monroe 1993.

Similarly, Lynx Edicions' IBC remains stuck with the original HBW classification – I wonder if there are plans to eventually adopt the current HBW/BirdLife taxonomy, perhaps after publication of Illustrated Checklist Vol 2?

PS. IBC News, 10 Feb 2015: Updating the taxonomy of the IBC and other improvements.

Last edited by Richard Klim : Sunday 10th May 2015 at 09:15. Reason: IBC PS.
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Old Tuesday 26th May 2015, 07:04   #33
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TiF Update May 25:

Locustella Warblers: The position of Styan's Grasshopper-Warbler, Locustella pleskei, has been adjusted based on Drovetski et al. (2015). The mitochondrial and nuclear trees are rather different. Drovetski et al. have investigated this situation, and it seems more likely that the nuclear phylogeny is correct concerning pleskei.

Alström et al. (2015b) described a new species, the Sichuan Bush-Warbler, Locustella chengi. They also undertook a reevaluation of the Russet Bush-Warbler complex. They recommended lumping Timor Bush-Warbler, Locustella timorensis, into Javan Bush-Warbler, Locustella montis and elevating idonea to species status. They did not provide an English name for idonea, and for the present, I'm using Tay Nguyen Bush-Warbler, Locustella idonea. IOC has suggested Langbian Bush-Warbler, but the range extends beyond Lian Bian (Biang?) and includes other parts of the Central Highlands (Tây Nguyên). They obtained two different phylogenies for the complex. I've adopted the BEAST chronogram, but it may not be entirely correct.
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Old Tuesday 26th May 2015, 09:03   #34
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IOC has suggested Langbian Bush-Warbler,
No they have not. IOC don't use that hideous hyphenation.

It'd be nice if TiF stopped doing so too
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Old Monday 29th June 2015, 06:55   #35
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Locustella chengi, L. idonea, L. timorensis

IOC Update Diary:

June 28 Accept Dalat Bush Warbler (L. idonea)

June 28 Lump Timor Bush Warbler with Javan Bush Warbler

June 28 Accept Sichuan Bush Warbler
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Old Wednesday 16th September 2015, 14:28   #36
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Little Rush Warbler

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Alström, Fregin, Norman, Ericson, Christidis & Olsson 2011. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae.

Bradypterus:
  • baboecala
  • 'baboecala' (Nigeria - B centralis?)
Dowsett & Dowsett-Lemaire 2015. New avian observations from south-western Ethiopia, with a review of overlooked literature and altitudinal limits. Bull BOC 135(3): 224–239.
Quote:
SUMMARY.—... and the specific status of Little Rush Warbler Bradypterus baboecala in Ethiopia is established. ...

... These observations confirm those of Benson (1948: 66), who remarked on the fact that vocalisations from Ethiopia and southern Africa were strikingly different from the high-pitched songs of populations centred on west-central Kenya. Molecular analyses confirm the specific distinction between these two groups (Alström et al. 2011), for which priority insists the names be B. baboecala (type locality South Africa) and B. centralis (type locality Rwanda). Most Ethiopian birds are B. b. abyssinicus, with B. b. sudanensis reportedly the form in the Gambela area (Ash & Atkins).
Eastern Rush Warbler Bradypterus [baboecala] centralis (incl sspp chadensis, sudanensis, elgonensis) is treated as a distinct species by H&M4 (citing Chappuis 2000, Alström et al 2011); but not by BirdLife, IOC, eBird/Clements or HBW.
(Dowsett & Dowsett-Lemaire appear to retain sudanensis within B baboecala ss. H&M4: "Treatment within B. centralis is tentative pending vocal and molecular information.")

Pearson 2006 (HBW 11).

Last edited by Richard Klim : Wednesday 16th September 2015 at 16:07.
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Old Saturday 19th September 2015, 08:43   #37
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Eastern Rush Warbler

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Eastern Rush Warbler Bradypterus [baboecala] centralis (incl sspp chadensis, sudanensis, elgonensis) is treated as a distinct species by H&M4 (citing Chappuis 2000, Alström et al 2011); but not by BirdLife, IOC, eBird/Clements or HBW.
(Dowsett & Dowsett-Lemaire appear to retain sudanensis within B baboecala ss. H&M4: "Treatment within B. centralis is tentative pending vocal and molecular information.")
IOC World Bird List:
www.worldbirdnames.org/updates/update-diary/
www.worldbirdnames.org/updates/proposed-splits/
Quote:
2015 Sept 17: Post proposed split of Eastern Rush Warbler on Updates/PS
PS 5.4: Eastern Rush Warbler Bradypterus centralis ... Alström et al. 2011, Dowsett & Dowsett-Lemaire 2015, H&M4
(Scope TBC...)

Btw, H&M4's use of the name 'Eastern' Rush Warbler is arguably questionable for a species that ranges west to Nigeria.

Last edited by Richard Klim : Saturday 19th September 2015 at 09:33.
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Old Tuesday 6th October 2015, 16:01   #38
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Bradypterus centralis

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Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Dowsett & Dowsett-Lemaire 2015. New avian observations from south-western Ethiopia, with a review of overlooked literature and altitudinal limits. Bull BOC 135(3): 224–239.

Eastern Rush Warbler Bradypterus [baboecala] centralis (incl sspp chadensis, sudanensis, elgonensis) is treated as a distinct species by H&M4 (citing Chappuis 2000, Alström et al 2011); but not by BirdLife, IOC, eBird/Clements or HBW.
(Dowsett & Dowsett-Lemaire appear to retain sudanensis within B baboecala ss. H&M4: "Treatment within B. centralis is tentative pending vocal and molecular information.")

Pearson 2006 (HBW 11).

IOC Update Diary
Oct 6 Accept Highland Rush Warbler
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Old Monday 30th November 2015, 14:54   #39
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Russet Bush Warbler complex

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Alström et al 2015. Avian Res 6(9).
  • Locustella [mandelli] mandelli – Russet Bush Warbler (incl melanorhyncha)
  • Locustella [mandelli] idonea – Langbian(?) Bush Warbler
  • Locustella [mandelli] chengi sp nov – Sichuan Bush Warbler
  • Locustella seebohmi - Benguet Bush Warbler
  • Locustella montis - Javan Bush Warbler (incl timorensis)
  • Locustella alishanensis - Taiwan Bush Warbler
Birdwatch Listcheck, 30 Nov 2015: Five in the bush.
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Old Sunday 10th January 2016, 06:43   #40
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TiF Update January 9

Locustellidae: Alström et al. (2011b) found that the Little Rush Warbler, Bradypterus baboecala, consists of at least two species. The Highland Rush Warbler, Bradypterus centralis, has been split from it. The correct allocation of subspecies remains uncertain. Alström et al. examined 4 subspecies: transvaalensis and tongensis from the baboecala group and centralis and elgonensis from the centralis group. IOC has included only the two subspecies in centralis, while H&M-4 (Dickinson and Christidis, 2014) also included chadensis and sudanensis in the Highland Rush Warbler (B. centralis).

There is additional information available. Kennerley and Pearson (2010) note that some birds from Cameroon, usually thought to be centralis have vocalizations that “sound like southern birds rather than those of SW Uganda and Rwanda.” They suggest that these birds are not centralis. Since then, they have been considered part of msiri. Stervander et al. (2005) found Rush Warbler on the Jos Plateau in central Nigeria that responded to playback of Little Rush Warbler calls, even though it looked more like centralis. Dowsett and Dowsett-Lemaire (2015) found that birds at Lake Awassa in Ethiopia responded to playback of songs from South Africa, suggesting that abyssinicus belongs in the baboecala group. More work needs to be done to properly sort out this situation.
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Old Thursday 29th December 2016, 14:53   #41
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Bradypterus graueri

Kahindo, C., Bates, J. M. and Bowie, R. C. K. (2016), Population genetic structure of Grauer's Swamp Warbler Bradypterus graueri, an Albertine Rift endemic. Ibis. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1111/ibi.12453

abstract

The endangered warbler Bradypterus graueri is endemic to the Albertine Rift, where it is restricted to montane swamps above 1900 m across the region. We studied genetic structure among six populations sampled across the species’ distribution in northern Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda and the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. A total of 2117 base pairs of mitochondrial data were sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses and network reconstruction of B. graueri haplotypes recovered three clades with a defined geographical pattern: clade 1, Virunga Volcanoes and Kigezi Highlands; clade 2, Rugege Highlands; and clade 3, Kahuzi-Biega Highlands; clades 2 and 3 are sisters to each other. Both landscape dynamics and historical climate are likely to have played a role in the diversification of this species. The divergence between clade 1 and clades 2 and 3 (168.5 Ka, 95% HPD 108.5, 244.4) coincides with a prolonged period of aridity in tropical Africa between 130-270 Ka. Similarly, the divergence between clades 2 and 3 (99.4 Ka, 95% HPD 55.4, 153.8) corresponds with a period of aridity just prior to 94 Ka. Populations sampled from the eastern arm of the central Albertine Rift (Kigezi and Rugege Highlands) show a coincident increase in effective population size after the Last Glacial Maximum at c. 15 Ka, whereas those sampled from Kahuzi-Biega on the western arm of the rift do not. Despite the perceived higher vagility of bird species relative to other vertebrates, the degree of phylogeographic structure among populations of B. graueri is similar to that reported for small mammals (Hylomyscus vulcanorum, Lophuromys woosnami, Sylvisorex vulcanorum) and a frog Hyperolius castaneus sampled across the central Albertine Rift. Collectively our results suggest that climate dynamics associated with late-Pleistocene cycles had a significant influence on driving the population genetic structure and associated levels of genetic diversity in B. graueri and other small terrestrial vertebrates. Our results have implications for the conservation of B. graueri and other endemics to the Albertine Rift, particularly in the context of other phylogegeographic studies centered on this biodiversity hotspot.
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Old Wednesday 4th April 2018, 05:49   #42
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Per Alström, Alice Cibois, Martin Irestedt, Dario Zuccon, Magnus Gelang, Jon Fjeldså, Michael J. Andersen, Robert G. Moyle, Eric Pasquet, Urban Olsson. Comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the grassbirds and allies (Locustellidae) reveals extensive non-monophyly of traditional genera, and a proposal for a new classification. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 3 April 2018.

Abstract:

The widespread Old World avian family Locustellidae (‘grassbirds and allies’) comprises 62 extant species in 11 genera. In the present study, we used one mitochondrial and, for most species, four nuclear loci to infer the phylogeny of this family. We analysed 59 species, including the five previously unsampled genera plus two genera that had not before been analysed in a densely sampled dataset. This study revealed extensive disagreement with current taxonomy; the genera Bradypterus, Locustella, Megalurus, Megalurulus and Schoenicola were all found to be non-monophyletic. Non-monophyly was particularly pronounced for Megalurus, which was widely scattered across the tree. Three of the five monotypic genera (Amphilais, Buettikoferella and Malia) were nested within other genera; one monotypic genus (Chaetornis) formed a clade with one of the two species of Schoenicola; whereas the position of the fifth monotypic genus (Elaphrornis) was unresolved. Robsonius was confirmed as sister to the other genera. We propose a phylogenetically informed revision of genus-level taxonomy, including one new generic name. Finally, we highlight several non-monophyletic species complexes and deep intra-species divergences that point to conflict in taxonomy and suggest an underestimation of current species diversity in this group.
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Old Wednesday 4th April 2018, 06:25   #43
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Helopsaltes gen. nov.

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Helopsaltes, new genus
Type species: Motacilla Certhiola Pallas, 1811. Gender masculine.
Included taxa: All of the species in clade K in Figs 1 and 2, which should now be named
Helopsaltes certhiola, Helopsaltes ochotensis, Helopsaltes pleskei, Helopsaltes pryeri,
Helopsaltes fasciolatus and Helopsaltes amnicola. All species epithets except fasciolatus are
invariable, and therefore must not change ending due to change of gender of the scientific
name.
Diagnosis: The songs consist of short (c. 2–5 s) strophes separated by distinct pauses (c. 2–15
s; highly variable depending on level of excitement). All or most of the elements in the
strophes are different from each other, or arranged in different “blocks” of similar notes. The
songs of the species of Locustella sensu stricto are less clearly separated into strophes, and
consist of very fast rattling reels or monotonous repetitions of rather simple syllables. See 3.3
and Fig. 3. No diagnostic morphological characters are known to us, but there are average
differences between Helopsaltes and Locustella sensu stricto in overall size (see 3.3).
Etymology: The name means “the marsh musician”, from Greek helos (ἕλος), marshy ground,
and Greek psaltes (ψάλτης), a musician playing a string instrument.
I mostly followed their recommendations, except that I kept Chaetornis as a separate genus of Schoenicola.
Robsonius is a highly distinct genus and maybe merit to be placed in separate family "Robsoniidae"

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Old Wednesday 4th April 2018, 11:44   #44
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Anyone has access to the tree?
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Old Wednesday 4th April 2018, 11:59   #45
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Anyone has access to the tree?

http://sci-hub.la/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.03.029
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Old Wednesday 4th April 2018, 20:36   #46
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Thanks! The African Bamboo Warbler close to River and Savi's, that's a shocker!
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Old Wednesday 4th April 2018, 20:42   #47
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I was surprised by the non-relationship between the two species of Schoenicola. Pending further study, I have placed the Fly river Grassbird in the genus Papuodytes and the Spinifexbird in the genus Eremiornis

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Old Thursday 12th April 2018, 05:23   #48
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TiF Update April 11

Locustellidae: The Grassbirds (Locustellidae) have been rearranged based on Alstrom et al. (2018a). Two species have changed genera: The Fan-tailed Grassbird moves from Schoenicola to Catriscus and the Bamboo Warbler moves from Bradypterus to Locustella. The genera Buettikoferella and Megalurulus have been merged into Cincloramphus. Bowdleria and Eremiornis have been merged into Poodytes. Amphilais has been merged into Bradypterus. Chaetornis has been merged into Schoenicola. Finally, part of Locustella has been separated as the new genus Helopsaltes Alström et al. 2018 (type species certhiola).
[Locustellidae, Paroidea & Sylvioidea I, 3.11]


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[...]
I kept Chaetornis as a separate genus from Schoenicola.
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I have placed the Fly river Grassbird in the genus Papuodytes and [kept] the Spinifexbird in the genus Eremiornis

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