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Birding the coast around Shanghai

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Old Saturday 19th March 2016, 11:46   #76
mjgrunwell
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Nanhui and Yangshan island, dipping on loon

Firstly thanks for your your post Roland, I only saw it on the way down today and was very keen for a look as the photo shows a hint on a neck collar (Pacific rather than BT?) unfortunately no luck today.

Today out with Stephan and Xueping. Started at Yangshan island, the rubbish dump gate was open and a large worker’s camp had been built since my last visit. Apparently they are building a new power station, the implications for future access are not good. Very thin at the dump valley, we walked over to the temple mount area. The best here was a large flock of dusky thrush with a nice Naumann’s thrush. We drove to the east of the island and found a few birds on a bushy slope and checked out quite a sizeable marsh by the side of the road.
We then headed back to the mainland and methodically worked the whole of the “Nanhui coastal patrol”, the seawall from the large river in the north, under the Dongtai bridge and down to the fishing town. The total distance is about 24km. We made the usual detours into the reeds and were rewarded by many calling reed parrotbill. We also checked out most of Dishui lake
and thoroughly checked out grandstand lake in search of the reported loon.

Complete list of birds seen, Saturday 19th March 2016, Nanhui and Yangshan island.

Gadwall 70+ on grandstand lake (GL)
Wigeon 100+ on Dishui lake (DL)
Shoveler 1 on GL
Tufted duck, many distant on DL, 30 on GL
Greater scaup, 11 on GL
Dabchick, many
GC grebe, 30+
Eurasian spoonbill, 50+ at Nanhui
Great bittern, 1 seen flying over the reeds 1 km south of the grandstand
BC Night heron, 2 on YI, 2 in clump 4, 15+ over the motorway
Eastern cattle egret, 1
Grey Heron, 30+
Intermediate egret, 6
Little egret, 150+
Kestrel, 1 on YI
Coot few
Moorhen 3
BW stilt, 2
LRP, 20+
Kentish plover, 10+
Dunlin, distant flock
Common snipe 5+
Swintail, probable Swinhoe’s 3
Spotted redshank, 2
Wood sandpiper, 8
Sanderling 1
Spotted dove, few
Hoopoe, 4
LT shrike, few
Common magpie 1
Large-billed crow, 4 on YI
Japanese tit, 3 on YI
Chinese penduline tit, some very large flocks today, Roland’s figure of 1000 could well be about right today.
Black-throated tit, 4+ on YI
Skylark sp few
Zitting cisticola one
Chinese bulbul, 20+ today
Pallas’s warbler, 2 on YI
VT parrotbill, 20+
Reed parrotbill, many calling today, heard only
Crested Myna, 10+
Silky starling, 80+ on YI, a high count
White-cheeked starling, 10+ on YI, 30+ on Nanhui
Pale thrush, 2
Dusky thrush, 25 on YI, 20+ Nanhui
Naumann’s thrush a nice male plus at least 2 female or poss intergrades on YI
Daurian redstart, 5+
Stejneger’s stonechat, 1 cracking male Nanhui
Tree sparrow, few flocks
Eastern yellow wagtail, 3 taivana today at Nanhui
White wagtail, 20+ all leucopsis
OB pipit, 3 on YI
Buff-bellied pipit 20+ at Nanhui
Brambling, 1 smart male at clump 2
Chinese Grosbeak, 7
Tristram’s bunting, 2 on YI
Chestnut-eared bunting, 1 at Nanhui
Little bunting, 8+ today
Black faced bunting, 5 today including a bright male matching sordida
Pallas’s reed bunting, several large flocks encountered in the reeds.

Hoping to return again in a few weeks when spring passage properly underway.
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Old Tuesday 3rd May 2016, 13:10   #77
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April coastal migration

Very busy, so little time to write.
I have been out birding for the last four weekends. Complete lists and nice photos can be seen at
http://www.shanghaibirding.com/2016/04/12/103-species/

http://www.shanghaibirding.com/2016/...pale-yangshan/

http://www.shanghaibirding.com/2016/...g-mig-pageant/

Rather than repeating info found at the website I want to summarise migration here on a species-by-species basis, as I see it.

The first of May in my view marks a key date between the protracted early spring migration and the start of the large movements of the northerly breeders. In my experience in Nanchang the second week of May was the peak for Spring passage, as the Shanghai coast was a good week earlier for autumn passage I am guessing it will be a week later for Spring.

Key species seen on the Nanhui coast during April 2016
YI = Yangshan island

Ducks: Not a great place for ducks. Tufted duck and gadwall lingered into early April, falcated and wigeon until mid April, a few garganey and teal, a few passing spotbill and mallard but nothing exciting.
Spoonbill, some flocks of Eurasian through April a few black-faced looking superb in breeding dress.
Eurasian bittern, heard booming at Nanhui mid April, do some stay to breed?
Chinese Pond heron, very much a summer visitor to Shanghai, numbers building late April
Purple heron, following on from a wintering record, few seen early April but not many.
Grey heron, just a few lingering by the end of April
Great white heron, always a few around
Intermediate heron, not obviously seasonal, a few through the winter, no clear sign of a Spring increase
Chinese egret, 3 seen on a mooring chain on a ship on YI, 2 cracking breeding birds on the beach at Nanhui on 30 April. Not common on passage, seem to go up in April and back early September
Raptors: Harriers do not winter at Nanhui, very little passage this April, a few osprey and eastern buzzard, the first Chinese sparrowhawk on 30 April
When are we going to see passing Oriental honey buzzard and grey-faced buzzard?
Rails and crakes: A very few coot by the end of May, we found a brown crake on the “South lawns” in mid April
Common snipe less obvious by the end of April, plenty of “swintail” seen at the end of the month.
I missed the sole record at Nanhui this spring of oriental dowitcher on 24 April, hoping to get lucky in early May.
Small numbers of waders often showing well on the pools behind the sea wall. The muddy fields held good numbers of sharp-tailed sandpiper and long-toed stint at the end of April.
Gulls and terns notable by their absence bar a few gull-billed and whiskered tern.
Large hawk cuckoo, one at Nanhui on 1 May
No cuckoos yet
Barn swallow very common, a few red rumped. A very few sand martin “type”.
Pacific swift in first two weeks of April but not later
Swinhoe’s minivet, a notably early migrant through Nanchang, one mid April on the coast.
A few bull-headed shrike seen on most days out, the first brown shrike at the end of the month. On 30 April saw the usual cristatus and lucionensis plus an obvious cinnamon “Japanese shrike” superciliosus
First black drongo on 30 April
Huge numbers of Chinese penduline tit early April, all gone by month-end
Canturians bush warbler, very commonly heard mid April, a bird that is very scarce through Nanchang, whilst brown-flanked is very common in spring around Nanchang but obviously less so on the Shanghai coast.
Asian stubtail, 1 at YI on 30 April
Oriental reed, well established and noisy in the Nanhui reeds by end of April
Black-browed reed, a few singing on 1 May
Dusky warbler, not common here, 1 on 30 April
Pallas’s warbler, this is a very common bird in Nanchang, peaking in late March, very much less common on the coast.
YB warbler, like Pallas’s a very common bird in Nanchang but with an obvious peak mid-April, plenty on the coast but nothing like the abundance on passage seen around Nanchang.
Arctic warbler type; very much a mid May bird in Nanchang, only one or two seen yet by me this spring on the Shanghai coast.
Pale-legged/Sakhalin leaf warbler, We had a few pale-legged in song on YI mid April (but never clearly seen) and a few seen but not heard at the end of the month. We always try to get them to respond to either PL or Sak songs but so far no luck.
Eastern crowned warbler, the commonest of the early warblers
Not yet seen two-barred greenish or any locustella or any interesting acros
Rufous faced warbler; a few wanderers on the coast mid month
Pale thrush, plenty around through to 1 May
Grey-backed, just a few by month-end
Japanese thrush, numbers peaked mid April
Eye-browed thrush, a May bird, the first on 1 May
Brown-headed thrush, a real skulker, very shy and often run fast. We had up to 6 birds being difficult on the coast 1 May
Dusky thrush, plenty early April, none by month end
Siberian blue robin, notorious skulkers, usually to be found in thick undergrowth in damp culverts. We had three on 1 May. I guess that peak spring passage is quite early, perhaps mid to late April but with so few records difficult to find a pattern, they are certainly early returners, most passage over by the end of August
Red-flanked bluetail, still a few lingering at the end of April
Flycatchers. Brown from around 15 April. Narcissus peaks third week of April; an absolute stunner of a bird. A few grey-streaked at end of month and a few mugimaki. Yellow-rumped and dark-sided not yet through. Blue and white perhaps the earliest of all with some great looking male nominate and intermedia on show.

Eastern yellow wagtail. Very common on the coast in mid-late April. A good mix of taivana and tschutschensis. A real birding highlight to get a close view of the males.
Citrine wagtail, up to three birds seen on the coast 23 April
White wagtail. lugens peaks early April, ocularis peaks late April, leucopsis always about
Olive-backed pipit, a common spring bird right through April
Red-throated pipit, not many, mostly mid month.

Pechora pipit, the highlight of last weekend. I found two skulking on the evening of 30 April. The next day was very warm and sunny, we found a few early on then I heard a song reminiscent of serin, it was a singing Pechora pipit atop a newly planted tree along the seawall! We spent time checking along the seawall for Pechora and counted a minimum of 26 birds, a quarter of which were singing! Perhaps the newly planted trees with the damp base reminded them of their taiga breeding habitat? Whatever the reason it was a very unexpected sight in Shanghai to see and hear Pechora pipit so well. The plumage and song were that of the widespread nominate race. Apparently menzbieri which breeds in north-eastern China has a quite different song and is a strong candidate for a future split as Menzbier’s pipit. See Craig’s amazing photos at the site quoted above.

Buntings. Tristram’s is very much a March/April bird, always associated with undergrowth with trees, never common, up to 6 in a day.
Chestnut-eared, a winter visitor, usually associated with more open areas near water, seemed to peak mid April
Little bunting, a mix of wintering and early migrants, always on the day list.
Yellow-browed bunting, not at all common on the coast, just the odd record in April.
Rustic bunting, a classic March bird, early to leave.
Elegant bunting, a winterer, early to leave
Yellow-breasted, a scarce migrant but seen on a few days through April, 3 on 1 May
Chestnut bunting, scarce, shy and difficult to get good views. We had a cracking male on 1 May
Japanese yellow bunting. The outstanding bird on the outstanding first of May! A cracking male on what will now be forever called “yellow bunting lane” see map

Black-faced bunting the commonest bunting, many about at the end of April
Pallas’s reed bunting, a common bird at Nanhui in March, numbers dwindling through mid April, none seen on 30 April

I am particularly keen to find a Japanese reed bunting, clearly not a winterer around here, will we get a May migrant?

Hoping to get out as much as possible over the next few weeks.
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Old Tuesday 3rd May 2016, 13:13   #78
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Last few maps of Nanhui

Two more maps
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Old Wednesday 5th October 2016, 07:28   #79
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Autumn birding, part 1

Long time no write.
A nice trip to Qinghai in late June/early July, see http://www.shanghaibirding.com/2016/...2016-week-1-2/ for nice pictures and a list of birds seen. Qinghai birding can be summed up in one word: thin. Thin air and thin birding. It takes real time and effort to pick up all the species needed. On my trip I saw almost everything I wanted, the biggest misses were Tibetan sandgrouse and Rusty-necklaced partridge. The highlights were Mongolian ground jay, all the snow finch except small, Przevalski’s finch, Tibetan bunting, Tibetan rosefinch, Tibetan babax and Ala Shan redstart.
After a summer in Europe back in Shanghai and out birding every weekend since Aug 20.
My target wader for this Autumn was Asiatic dowitcher. Discovered that on the Nanhui coast they are uncommon in small numbers, usually with black-tailed godwit. I had good views on three successive weekends, a mix of adults and juveniles.
My other tick of the Autumn was Fairy Pitta, see http://www.shanghaibirding.com/2016/09/04/pitta-nanhui/ for a nice picture.
Over 1-3 October I travelled up to the Rudong coast, spent a whole day on the Dongtai coast (see earlier threads for maps) scored with both Nordmann’s and SBS. On 3 October we found a huge dry high-tide wader roost near Yangkou.
Rather than give a day-by-day breakdown I thought it would be best just to review by species for early/mid Autumn.

I reckon than Autumn migration down the Shanghai coast can be broken into 4 chunks.
1. Late summer. This is from late July to third week of August. This period is the best for waders passing through. Very few passerines
2. Early Autumn. Last week of August to Third week of September. Good numbers of waders but sibe blue robin and Japanese paradise flycatcher dominant passerines of interest.
3. Mid Autumn, from the arrival of the first White’s thrushes around 23 September to the first Pallas’s reed bunting at the end of October. This is the time for thrushes and interesting passerines.
4. Late Autumn, from the end of October to early December, buntings, ducks and thrushes.

Highlight Species list for Autumn 2016 around Shanghai, from 20 August to 3 October 2016

Common pheasant, resident, always seen in small numbers
Chinese bamboo partridge, 1 calling at Yangkou on 3 Oct, I have heard this bird here before, strange occurrence, either a relict population or feral origin.
Ruddy shelduck, one at Nanhui 24 Sep
Very few other ducks except good numbers of garganey early Sep. Many ducks were flying in but too distant on 24 Sep.
BF spoonbill, 35 at Dongtai on 2 Oct
Yellow bittern, few, no Shrenck’s this year yet.
Striated heron, few on the coast mid Sep
Chinese egret, 5 at Dongtai on 2 Oct, a few others around Nanhui. Not common but can be found by scoping through little egrets. Leg colour is variable in Autumn, yellowish black is usual but one had fully greyish green legs, legs noticeably thicker than little. Bill structure diagnostic; slightly taller with a distinctive very slight droop on the distal third.
In flight I can see no difference in structure from little.
No pelicans so far this autumn
Raptors: very poor on this coast, best was a movement of Hobby in late September. Still waiting for a passing grey-faced buzzard.
Japanese sparrowhawk, a few on 1 and 2 Oct
Complete list of waders:
1. Oystercatcher, hundreds of the osculans race at Dongtai on 2 Oct. This is a potential future split as Korean Oystercatcher.
2. Black winged stilt, usually a small flock to be found at Nanhui
3. Pied Avocet, a few at Nanhui late Sep. Commoner later.
4. Grey-winged lapwing, obvious movement late Sep/early Oct. 50+ seen around Chongming on 1 Oct.
5. Pacific golden plover, an earlier bird, small numbers late August/early Sep
6. Grey plover, big numbers on mudflats at Dongtai 2 Oct
7. Common ringed plover, a single tundrae at the Pudong sod farms on 3 Sep, a rare bird in China.
8. LRP, a common bird on dry flats
9. Kentish plover, thousands at the roost at Yangkou on 3 Oct
10. Lesser sand plover, thousands at the Yangkou roost on 3 Oct
11. Greater sand plover, a much scarcer bird than lesser, perhaps half a percent are greater.
12. Pintailed snipe, common early September.
13. Swinhoe’s snipe a few late August. IMO
14. Common snipe, arrive mid September, only snipe seen on 2 Oct
15. Asian dowitcher, perhaps 8+ individuals at Nanhui over three weeks
16. Eastern black-tailed godwit, some big flocks of 500+ late August at Nanhui
17. Bar tailed godwit, not common, a few on mudflats.
18. Little curlew, one at Yangkou roost 3 Oct
19. Whimbrel, variegatus race a strong candidate for splitting as Siberian Whimbrel, commonest mid August
20. Eurasian curlew, hundreds at Dongtai 2 Oct
21. Far-eastern curlew, 30+ at Dongtai on 2 October, I was identifying the bird on their more strident, rasping flight call at Dongtai.
22. Common redshank, not common, a few small flocks on fresh pools at Nanhui.
23. Spotted redshank, by far the commonest wader in the Chinese interior, just a few birds at the coast this Autumn.
24. Marsh sandpiper, commonest in August
25. Common Greenshank, common on the mudflats and pools
26. Nordmann’s greenshank, one hanging around Nanhui through September, 29 counted in front of a quickly-rising tide at Dongtai on 2 October.
27. Green sandpiper, a few on fresh marshes
28. Wood sandpiper, peaks in late August/early Sep
29. Grey-tailed tattler, peak numbers late August, 30+ on a good day.
30. Terek Sandpiper, I counted 155 at roost on a lakeshore at Dongtai on 2 Oct
31. Common sandpiper, always around in small numbers
32. Ruddy turnstone, small numbers at the sod farm 3 Sep a few elsewhere.
33. Great Knot, peak counts of 60+ in late August at Nanhui
34. Red knot, a good year for counts at Nanhui, peak counts of over 100 birds
35. Sanderling, few
36. Red-necked stint, peak in late august, still plenty to see on drier mudflats at Dongtai on 2 Oct
37. Temminck’s stint, 10+ at sod farm 3 Sep, never common.
38. Long-toed stint, peak early September, not really coastal.
39. Sharp-tailed sandpiper, peak counts late August/early September, scarce by October.
40. Curlew sandpiper, peak count of 23 birds on 20 August
41. Dunlin, later to go through and winters on mudflats
42. Spoon-billed sandpiper, I saw two birds on the mud just 80m from the Dongtai seawall road on a falling tide on 2 October, at 3pm I said goodbye with genuine sadness and walked off to find passerines. My companions continued to watch as they came even closer with a peak count of 13 birds including 2 flagged individuals, green left 29 and yellow left 59. Just so sad when you know there is no hope of more than pushing out extinction date by a decade
43. Broad-billed sandpiper, small numbers through Autumn, perhaps more later in season on mudflats.
44. Ruff, I had one in flight early September at Nanhui and just missed another at Nanhui on 25 Sep.
45. Red-necked phalarope, one at Nanhui on 27 Aug
46. Oriental pratincole, 600+ at Pudong sod farms early Sep.

So 46 species of wader so far this autumn, it must be possible get the magic 50 in a season if we get lucky with say Pec sand, white-rumped sand, buff-breast, long-billed dowitcher and a rare plover?

Gulls, never seen Saunders’s at Nanhui but counted 430 at the Yangkou roost on 3 Oct.
Black-headed gull, start to move through late September, plenty at Dongtai and Yangkou early October.
Vega gull, the common large gull, now includes Mongolian
Black-tailed gull, looks a proper big gull in flight but when roosting just a bit bigger than black-headed, common gull sized. Peak counts around 20.
Heuglins, a nice adult at Dongtai on 2 October.
The Nanhui coast is very poor for gulls, still looking for Relict and slaty-backed as well as any white-winged gull in winter. Common gull is a major bogey on my China list.
Sea Terns. Caspian and gull-billed regular at the coast. Common tern in very small numbers a few little terns. No other sea terns yet seen.
Marsh terns, white-winged tern peaked at 3000 on 17 Sep at Nanhui, whiskered tends to become commoner later.
Red turtle dove, 10+ around the southern patrol at Nanhui through early September
Cuckoo’s: Very hard work in Autumn, presumed mostly common in late Aug and through September, 3 Lesser cuckoo seen well at Yangkou 3 Oct
Lesser coucal, presumed an elusive breeder at Nanhui, a few seen.
Himalayan swiftlet, not a vagrant to the coast but and uncommon early autumn migrant seen most weeks in late August/early Sep
Fairy Pitta. The stand-out bird of the Autumn. We refound a bird in microforest 2 on 3 Sep, this bird hung around until the next weekend attracting a huge crowd of photographers. We found another on 10 Sep at MF 4. It is clear that Fairy Pitta is a regular migrant on the Nanhui coast. By far the best bird I have seen this year.

Part two to follow…
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Old Saturday 8th October 2016, 07:47   #80
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Autumn birding part 2

On Thursday 6 October I took the metro to Dishui Lake and a cab out to MF8. I worked the northern clumps then walked south. It was blustery and started to rain. I got a lift down to the hotel area thereby missed the southern clumps. I briefly checked the carpark and GPS grove. All rather quiet but an obvious arrival of grey heron, several hundred, along with a single purple heron. A lot of distant ducks flying about but we have never been able to nail down exactly where they are. Small numbers of flycatcher and only two arctic-type warblers. The highlight was a total of 3 Woodcock seen well. This brings the wader count for the coastal area to 47 this Autumn. If we include Jacana as a wader then the PT Jacana seen at Nanhui this week takes the total to 48.
I do wonder if any other area can claim so many species of wader in a single season? Other than the east-asian flyway I cannot think that north America or Europe could deliver 48 species in a single season (say within a 160km/100 mile radius). Open to suggestions.

To continue my review of species seen this Autumn:
Tiger shrike, peaks late August early September, max counts over 6 birds
Bull-headed shrike, first of the season this week
Chinese grey shrike, we had a single adult at Dongtai on 2 October
BN Oriole, comes through all autumn in small numbers.
Black drongo, sometimes hard to distinguish migrants from resident birds, tend to move quite late.
Hair crested drongo, usually solitary and found in trees, not perched up like black. One at Dongtai on 2 October.
Ashy drongo, much commoner through Nanchang in autumn than the Shanghai coast.
Amur paradise flycatcher, one or two females this September.
Japanese paradise flycatcher, peaks from late August to mid September, max counts around 10 birds along the Nanhui coast.
Yellow-bellied tit, an uncommon but regular migrant on the coast, 1 at Dongtai on 2 October
Barn swallow. A very common bird on the coast, always hundreds in a day from late August into October
Sand/pale martin, seemed to peak late August, probably sand
Asian stubtail. In past autumns I have seen dozens in a day in early October, very small numbers so far this year.
Acrocephalus warblers: Other than oriental reeds hanging around or migrants moving through just nothing!
Locustella warblers: A complete blank so far this Autumn
Dusky warbler, always later, a few in Yangkou 3 Oct
Pallas’s leaf, the first through the Jiangsu coast 2 Oct
Yellow-browed, peaks late September
Arctic warbler, the most apparent warbler from August to mid October, probably a range of populations (and species?) passing through over the season.
Pale-legged leaf warbler, fairly common late August to early October
Sakhalin leaf warbler strongly suspect but until criteria sorted cannot be sure, a few early September? Maybe 90:10 Pale-legged:Sak around Shanghai??
Two-barred greenish, uncommon, not seen one this year
Eastern crowned warbler, fairly common from late August right through to early October
White-eyes, not many yet this year, passing groups may harbor chestnut-flanked
Sibe thrush, the classic thrush of late September/early October. A few at Nanhui and Jiangsu coast
White’s thrush, a few early ones on 23 Sep but still awaiting for the big arrival
Grey-backed thrush, odd ones reported but, as with White’s still to arrive en masse
Japanese thrush, no records yet, very much a late October bird
Eye-browed thrush, the odd report
Siberian rubythroat, still to arrive along with bluetail
Siberian blue robin. The signature bird of the micro-forests late August/early September. Need sibe blue robin? Fly to Shanghai Pudong airport around 1 Sep. Take taxi to Nanhui coast, carefully check microforests 4/5 and 1/2, should score easily! Peak counts this year were 15+ early Sep, need settled, hot weather for birds to build up in microforests.
Daurian redstart, still to arrive.
Flycatchers:
Grey streaked, tend to be mid Sept on
Dark-sided, maybe different populations passing as can occur right through autumn
Asian brown, by far the most numerous, every day from late August to late October
Yellow-rumped, the early species, peaks early Sep, though can get singles into October
Narcissus, seems to be strictly spring passage (third/fourth week of April), no records this autumn
Chinese flycatcher, very scarce, still waiting
Mugimaki, the late one, first of season around 20 September
Taiga, fairly regular from mid September
Blue and white, the commonest fly in the microforests late September, a good mix of adult males, first-year males and females this year.
Asian verditer, one reported
Forest wagtail, can occur at coast in September, but still waiting for my first in China
Eastern yellow wagtail, more difficult to race the birds in autumn but some very big movements in early September.
Richards pipit, common late September
Olive backed pipit, the first of season at Yangkou on 3 Oct
Pechora pipit, scarce, a few early September
Red-throated pipit, often heard overhead early Oct
Buntings: A few yellow-breasted in September at Nanhui, the first black-faced and little arrived Dongtai on 2 Oct.

My key late autumn targets are:
Japanese robin, Japanese reed bunting, Japanese grey bunting, white-bellied pigeon plus any Acro or Locustella.
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Old Sunday 9th October 2016, 06:48   #81
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This brings the wader count for the coastal area to 47 this Autumn. If we include Jacana as a wader then the PT Jacana seen at Nanhui this week takes the total to 48.
I do wonder if any other area can claim so many species of wader in a single season? Other than the east-asian flyway I cannot think that north America or Europe could deliver 48 species in a single season (say within a 160km/100 mile radius). Open to suggestions.
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Your count of 48 waders is indeed impressive. One area that might rival you in a good year would be the Cheyenne Bottoms Wetland area in central Kansas, USA which is about 16,600 hectare of protected wetland. Using the official bird list and including Rails; Gallinules; Cranes; Stilts, Avocets; Plovers; Sandpipers; Wood Stork; Herons; Ibises; not including the accidentals, they could produce even more variety. Partially what you would want to include as waders. http://ksoutdoors.com/KDWPT-Info/Loc...eyenne-Bottoms Total bird counts used to be truly amazing and although still impressive have suffered in this century. For the near-by Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, which is an inland salt marsh, https://www.fws.gov/uploadedFiles/Bi...ist%202011.pdf I did a quick count and I think there were 61 waders. Both are on my bucket list but on my last trip back it was one of the rainiest seasons on record and every time I was free to make the over 500 mile (800 km) round trip the weather would not cooperate.
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Old Monday 10th October 2016, 13:47   #82
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My record in a day in Hong Kong is 42 species of wader - (or shorebirds in American English) - not including cranes storks, herons, egrets, rails ibises etc.

Cheers
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Old Tuesday 11th October 2016, 07:04   #83
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My record in a day in Hong Kong is 42 species of wader - (or shorebirds in American English) - not including cranes storks, herons, egrets, rails ibises etc.

Cheers
Mike
And of course the one time that I have been to Hong Kong I had three days of rain from the typhoon.
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Old Sunday 16th October 2016, 07:51   #84
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Brown eared pheasant near Taiyuan

Firstly Thank You Mike for clarifying that both you and I are using waders in the British sense of shorebirds. Your 42 in a day is my point; I am not claiming that Shanghai is superior simply that in terms of either day count (42+) or season count (48+) the east-asian flyway is the place to be. Any idea what the HK record season species count is? Ever hit 50?

On Friday night flew to Taiyuan with Stephan and Xueping. Overnight in an airport hotel then a hire car to Xuanzhong temple. We had a pair of brown eared pheasant as we walked up to the temple. We paid RMB20 to walk into the temple proper, nice views of plain laughing thrush. On walking down we had one bird being fed by a shop-owner. On checking the gulley below the temple we had a flock of 14 brown eared. The birds are not automatic, late morning there was no sign. It is possible to pay locals to call/feed the birds to encorage them to come down off the slopes but we did not have to resort to this.
Please see the attached maps which provide all the detail you need.
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Old Sunday 16th October 2016, 08:06   #85
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Xuanzhong temple continued..

See the maps attached.

We had meadow and elegant bunting and lots of Daurian redstart and Pallas's warblers in the bushes around the big new (overflow?) car park about 400m below the temple. The best here was a fast moving flock of long-tailed rosefinch (lupidus), we walked up the steeply-climbing track on the west side and got some better views of these great birds.

Spotted nutcracker of the brown-backed, small-billed interdicta race were surprisingly common feeding on the roadside pines 600m above the main road. We also saw nutcracker on a brief visit to the main temple in Taiyuan.

If you cannot rent a car then negotiate a taxi for the day from the airport. I woud guess that RMB800 would be plenty for a day out but I notice that all the taxis at the airport were electric, unless they were hybrids not sure of the range implications.
It is about 70 minutes drive from the airport to the temple.
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Old Wednesday 26th July 2017, 12:24   #86
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Hi All,

I have a work trip to Shanghai next week and may have the w/e of 5th and 6th for some birding. I am reading this thread with interest, especially in Reed Parrotbill and other stuff from Nanhui and Yangshan island. But I note the destruction you have been documenting above from last year. Is the site still worth visiting? Or does the lack of activity on the thread mean the site is dead?

Cheers, Ian
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Old Thursday 27th July 2017, 03:15   #87
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Hello Ian,

There is a good news, the local government has halted all the "landscaping" operations. I haven't been to Nanhui/Yangshan islands since May but apparently there has been some goodies in Nanhui. Yangshan is only good during migration but the port is been expanding rapidly and we noticed nothing extraordinary during spring.

Reed Parrotbill is very much doable at Nanhui plus the returning shorebirds.
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Old Thursday 27th July 2017, 10:58   #88
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Hello Ian,

There is a good news, the local government has halted all the "landscaping" operations. I haven't been to Nanhui/Yangshan islands since May but apparently there has been some goodies in Nanhui. Yangshan is only good during migration but the port is been expanding rapidly and we noticed nothing extraordinary during spring.

Reed Parrotbill is very much doable at Nanhui plus the returning shorebirds.
Thanks so much! I will look into the logistics of getting there.

Best wishes, Ian
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