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Algeria, Tamanrasset 3rd (1 Viewer)

spocki

Well-known member
Hi

More photos from Tam.
1 - Egyptian vulture
2 - no idea
3 - Grey shrike (great?)
4 - some kind of finch
5 - Red-billed firefinch

Thanks a lot for your help!
 

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1. yes, great photo, don't understand the doubt
2. Desert Lark
3. Great Grey Shrike (taxonomy not consensual, but the local taxon is algeriensis: Lanius excubitor algeriensis, per IOC)
4. African Silverbill
5. yes, Red-billed Firefinch
 
Thank you!

Regarding:
1. yes, great photo, don't understand the doubt

I read somewhere that they always come in flocks and certainly saw them in groups of at least half a dozen individuals in Oman. In Tam, they always came as individuals. Low numbers? Local behaviour just a bit different?
 
Last edited:
3. Great Grey Shrike (taxonomy not consensual, but the local taxon is algeriensis: Lanius excubitor algeriensis, per IOC)

I must make a correction here. For some reason I was assuming coastal Algeria, when the location is well down south (it had to be, with the Firefinches and Silverbill).
L.e. algeriensis occurs in coastal areas, at Tamanrasset it should be L. e. elegans. Sorry for that.
 
I read somewhere that they always come in flocks and certainly saw them in groups of at least half a dozen individuals in Oman. In Tam, they always came as individuals. Low numbers? Local behaviour just a bit different?
Low numbers - endangered species, sadly, a victim of (all too often deliberate, illegal) poisoning.
 
Poisoning - makes you despair of mankind.

But thanks everyone for your help!

Yes, indeed. An every year scarcer bird, seriously threatened. This autumn we had one more nesting pair falling victim of poisoning in northern Portugal. They have disappeared from several former nesting sites. Quite sad. Black (Monk/Cinereous) Vultures seem to be doing better though.
 
The Egyptian Vultures in southern Algeria (Tamanrasset region and Tassili n'Ajjer) are sedentary, unlike their conspecifics in the north of the country and rest of the Mediterranean region which are migratory (except island populations). Last winter, a colleague who works with the Forestry recorded almost everyday groups of 2-5 birds in the Tassili n'Ajjer. So they do occur is small groups in this area as well. In any case, the species is generally solitary in breeding areas and the only time where they aggregate is at the feeding and roosting places (and that’s the case only for non-breeding adults and immature birds).
 
The Egyptian Vultures in southern Algeria (Tamanrasset region and Tassili n'Ajjer) are sedentary, unlike their conspecifics in the north of the country and rest of the Mediterranean region which are migratory (except island populations). Last winter, a colleague who works with the Forestry recorded almost everyday groups of 2-5 birds in the Tassili n'Ajjer. So they do occur is small groups in this area as well. In any case, the species is generally solitary in breeding areas and the only time where they aggregate is at the feeding and roosting places (and that’s the case only for non-breeding adults and immature birds).

Thanks, this is interesting. I hope to go there soon.
 
Spent six weeks in the Hoggar and Tassili in 1984 into 86 no sign back then of any vultures, is there really any forestry in the Tassili my enduring memory was a moonscape, rock and sand, incredible birding though.
 

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