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Glasses wearers - most comfortable 10x42 you have found? (1 Viewer)

wdc

Well-known member
I wear glasses all the time, and frankly would not spot very many birds without them. My 10x binocular of choice is the Noctivid.
It just fits me extremely well with my glasses on. The apparent FOV almost fills my vision, so just a bit of a crisp, black edge is visible.
But that's just me. I think every one who wears glasses will find their own model that suits them fine. What's right for me, may not work so well for another.

I suspect the Zeiss SF Victory in 10x would also work for me, but I don't want to tempt myself, as the Noctivid does a fine job, and I have enough binoculars at this point. I also see 10x as more of an aesthetic choice than anything else. If you carry a scope, the difference between 8 and 10x seems irrelevant, but 10x does provide a little extra detail, especially close up. Every time I use it I'm reminded why I like it so much.

I've mainly been birding lately with an 8x32, but when I want 10x, the Noctivid is the one.

-Bill
 

Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
For me, I find that true enjoyment is to be found towards and beyond 70° AFov (the technical definition of an 'extra-wide' field of view) provided that it is well corrected.

Then why do you like the Nikon MHG, it is not 70 AFOV degrees? This property is then only fulfilled by the NL.

Andreas
 
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Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
Then why do you like the Nikon MHG, it is not 70 AFOV degrees? This property is then only fulfilled by the NL.

Andreas
??
By the simple method it's 68.5° AFov.
That qualifies as "towards 70° AFov - in fact it's well and truly towards it.
FWIW - that 120m Fov (and beyond) for a 10x, that's pretty well corrected, and with enough ER for glasses wearers is where I find the view more enjoyable, than more restrictive fields.

The only 10x binocular I've really enjoyed with less Fov than that is the exceptional Swarovski 10x50 SV.


Chosun 🙅‍♀️
 
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Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
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Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
Chosun, with the simple method, all binoculars have more AFOV, even those really "only" have 60 ° degrees.
I think the simple method is completely pointless, if you take further measurements you get disillusioned!


Andreas
Andreas - your first link didn't work for me ... ?

I understand that some manufacturer's are now starting to include measured data which acounts for the distortion profile.

The Fovs in your second link are actually 'overstated' compared to the simple method ....

Whatever - I'm happy at 120m and over in a 10x, and 145m and over in an 8x, provided they are sharp across just about all the field, and with enough ER.


Chosun 🙅‍♀️
 

Patudo

Well-known member
In my personal experience no 10x40/42 has truly had the ease of view of a 5mm exit pupil binocular (8x40/42, 10x50), especially when wearing glasses and especially when observing distant targets. But if I was routinely going on 8.5 to 13 mile walks, viewing comfort can go hang.

Optical excellence in binoculars does not always go hand in hand with a comfortable or easy view. Some require more exact eye placement in order to get the best from them. Practice and familiarity can help, but some designs are just easier on the eye than others.

It reads to me as though the Conquest best fits your requirements, but if the cost of the Noctivid is less important to you than having some extra cash in the bank, by all means treat yourself.
 

Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
Andreas - dein erster Link hat bei mir nicht funktioniert ... ?

Ich verstehe, dass einige Hersteller jetzt damit beginnen, Messdaten aufzunehmen, die das Verzerrungsprofil erklären.

Die Fovs in Ihrem zweiten Link sind im Vergleich zur einfachen Methode tatsächlich "überbewertet".

Was auch immer - ich bin glücklich bei 120 m und mehr in einem 10x und 145 m in einem 8x, vorausgesetzt, sie sind auf dem gesamten Feld scharf und mit genug ER.


Chosun 🙅‍♀️
Der erste Link sollte jetzt funktionieren!

Swarovski hat seine Brillen immer sehr genau vermessen, das macht Zeiss mit Alpha-Brillen!
Es macht einfach keinen Sinn, die einfache Methode zu verwenden, da einige der Objektive 5° mehr AFOV haben, als sie wirklich haben.
Das MHG 10x42 sollte eigentlich 64° Grad AFOV haben, der Unterschied zu einem 60° AFOV Glas ist auch nicht so groß!
Wenn ich das Bild im 8x56 SLC 60 ° Grad AFOV sehe, lasse ich gerne ein zusätzliches Fernglas herumliegen.

Andreas
 
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dorubird

Well-known member
Romania
ease of viewing (for me with glasses) - checked
large field of view (6.8 degrees) - checked
edge clarity (95%) - checked
immersion effect and "3d live" (for me) - checked

impeccable Focus wheel - checked
brightness - checked
clarity definition - checked
balance in hands - checked
glare resistance- checked

"wallet resistance" - unchecked
volume occupancy space - unchecked

In short "robotic words", this is for me the black edition SF 10x42...
 

Bentley03

Well-known member
United Kingdom
I wear glasses all the time, and frankly would not spot very many birds without them. My 10x binocular of choice is the Noctivid.
It just fits me extremely well with my glasses on. The apparent FOV almost fills my vision, so just a bit of a crisp, black edge is visible.
But that's just me. I think every one who wears glasses will find their own model that suits them fine. What's right for me, may not work so well for another.

I suspect the Zeiss SF Victory in 10x would also work for me, but I don't want to tempt myself, as the Noctivid does a fine job, and I have enough binoculars at this point. I also see 10x as more of an aesthetic choice than anything else. If you carry a scope, the difference between 8 and 10x seems irrelevant, but 10x does provide a little extra detail, especially close up. Every time I use it I'm reminded why I like it so much.

I've mainly been birding lately with an 8x32, but when I want 10x, the Noctivid is the one.

-Bill
Well, Bill, your post made me smile, because thanks to the recommendations of numerous members on this thread, I have ended up on exactly the same page as you. The fit and view through the 10x42 Noctivid for me, is EXACTLY as you describe it being for you. Seriously, it's just so, so comfortable, and an absolute joy to use.

The reason I returned them was because of that crisp, black edge, which, when comparing them side by side with the Victory SF's, made me feel I was being a bit short changed with the width of the apparent FOV. But, having now had the opportunity to properly test a pair of Victory SF's in the field over the last 24 hours, and I'll spend more time with them again tomorrow, I have realised that an exceptionally wide FOV is worth nothing, if the binoculars aren't first a perfectly comfortable fit, which the SF's aren't, and Noctivid is (for me).

The Conquest HD's do indeed, as Patudo says, fit my requirements (I would certainly now choose them over the Victory SF's), but the Noctivid takes the comfort/ease of use element of binocular ownership to an entirely different level, for me.

I have no regrets about returning the Noctivid's, because I suspect I would always have had that nagging doubt about whether or not I'd actually made the best/right choice, but now I've been able to properly test some SF's and explore every conceivable setting, I know they are not for me.

Regarding the SF's I have been loaned via the Try Zeiss scheme, I was surprised that they were supplied without the rainguard, especially at this time of year, and I can see a considerable amount of wear to the exposed non-armoured areas of the hinges. Of course, I have no idea how tough a life they have led, or their age, certainly there were no issues with the optics, but they are just beginning to look a bit tatty in some areas. The armour is in perfect condition.

So, in the end, the Noctivid IS DEFINITELY MY BINOCULAR. I shall repurchase in the coming days, but first I have another decision to make, should I buy black (as I did the first time), or olive green?

My very grateful thanks to everyone who has made recommendations and helped me to find my perfect binocular (Andreas, Dorubird, Chosun, &&&). If there is one lesson I have learned on this forum, it is that however many articles, reviews, spec sheets and analyses you read, and however many recommendations you are given, the only way to find the right instrument for YOU, is to test, test and test again, it is crucial to try before you buy.

Thank you very much all! 🙂
 

Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
Hi Bentley,

The Noctivids are really excellent binoculars, you can't go wrong with them, you made a good decision...(y)

Andreas
 

Bentley03

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Hi Bentley,

The Noctivids are really excellent binoculars, you can't go wrong with them, you made a good decision...(y)

Andreas
Absolutely, Andreas, I'm repurchasing them with absolute confidence. The build felt easily the best of any bins I handled, they simply oozed quality, are more or less as compact as the Conquest HD's, and the view, if a little narrower than the SF's, was absolutely the equal, or possibly even better (to my eyes), in the central target area. I think I got a little hung up on that wider field of view the SF's have, and by reviews which gave me the sense that the Noctivid is a somewhat disappointing, or inferior, alpha bin beside the NL's, EL's, SF's, and maybe even some discontinued or non top of the range alphas. Maybe it is, on paper, and maybe the comparative current retail price reflects that, but it's the only alpha bin I'd want to, or be prepared to, own, because they're the only ones which are a perfect fit. Comfort, ease of use and a relaxed view were always my prerequisites, the optical trickery and science distracted me from that.

Thanks again,
James 🙂
 

dorubird

Well-known member
Romania
Use your Noctivid with pleasure, and don't look back because you don't have to! After a long journey, this means that you have found the best pair of binoculars for you! (it's like building a relationship :) )
 

Bentley03

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Use your Noctivid with pleasure, and don't look back because you don't have to! After a long journey, this means that you have found the best pair of binoculars for you! (it's like building a relationship :) )
Thank you, Dorubird, and I can assure you there will be no looking back, now that I've double checked the fit of the SF's. In terms of building a relationship, I felt I did that within moments of picking them up for the first time, but maybe it happened a bit too quickly, and that is why I didn't completely trust my instincts.

Thank you again,
James 🙂
 

Bentley03

Well-known member
United Kingdom
I've just received emails from Try ZEISS to confirm that my security deposit has been refunded and my hire order is now completed and closed, but what I didn't know, prior to booking the two day trial, is that once completed you are eligible for cashback of up to 10% if you go ahead and purchase the product through one of their listed stockists. In the case of the 10x42 Victory SF's I tested last weekend, they list the cashback amount as £200. That almost brings the SF's down to the price of the Noctivid, assuming there isn't a catch and you have pay the full RRP.

Anyway, thought I'd pass that on, in case it's not common knowledge, for anyone who may be in the market for a brand new ZEISS product.

James 🙂
 

Bentley03

Well-known member
United Kingdom
A little update...

So, despite suggesting on another thread that I would be purchasing a pair of black NV's, I saw some green ones and fell in love with them, but the retailer only had 8x42's and was charging a premium over a pair of black ones if I ordered a pair of green 10x42's from them. I found another stockist who had green 10x42's in stock, and was not charging a premium over black, so ordered them.

They arrived on Saturday and for the first time I had the opportunity to admire the exquisite feel and build quality at leisure, they are an instrument of rare beauty and refinement indeed.

I was one very happy chappy, at first! 😉

After a fairly substantial period of time holding and admiring them, I excitedly took them outside to rediscover that incredibly easy view I remembered from testing them. I held them up to my eyes, adjusted the IDP, reached for the focus wheel and turned it. To my horror, it felt immediately notchy/jerky, not perfectly smooth like the NV's I had tested. The cause of this is what I estimate to be 2-3mm of play when changing the direction of focus. ☹️

I was comfortable buying from this stockist, because they state on their website that they thoroughly check all optics for faults before dispatch, so thought I was minimising the risk of an occurrence such as this. Not that I was anticipating any issues in the first place, after all, these are Leicas! 😕

Is this a known (or even common) issue with the NV's I've not heard of previously?

Anyway, I'm quite irritated by this, spending a not insignificant amount of money on an alpha product and having the hassle of repackaging and returning them. ☹️

The view, however, was every bit as easy and wonderful as I remembered, I know I made the right choice! 🙂
 

eronald

Well-known member
Chosun that's a deadly argument!
I studied classical guitar and saxophone, do you think I can recognize pitches better than some amateur musicians?
None of this, there are people who have perfect pitch and don't know anything about it.
There are predispositions that are just there without us having to do anything about it, other parts are culture-related, that affects music as well as the perception of colors.

Andreas
I was an ICC member, and a color consultant once upon a time, and I paint a bit. Consensus is that color is indeed a predisposition in that you train to use what you have, but it needs to be there initially. Also young women tend to have much better color vision than men, as any man will realize after visiting the cosmetics department of a store. Someone who has practiced and renders an opinion on color is usually taken seriously in the color community, precisely because that person is assumed to have both the ability to perceive and that to explain and describe. If someone doesn't like a "cultural" color, that is too bad for the manufacturer - sorry, there is no way to make europeans or Americans like japanese green tints, as Sony found out with their camera line. I don't know why Zeiss keep selling binoculars that tint to the blue or green - I've seen several. I wonder if it isn't just that they source coated optics from Japan.

Edmund
 
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Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
sorry, there is no way to make europeans or Americans like japanese green tints,
Hi,

the Japanese are very fond of Leica binoculars; sales in the 80s and 90s were significantly higher than that of Zeiss binoculars.

Basically, more saturated colors are preferred in Japan, Nikon has taken up the tradition and copied the color balance of the Leica's.
In terms of color matching, the EDG are actually identical to the old Trinovids.

Colors have a meaning insofar as they are subject to different cultural and historical evaluations, black is not the "dark" and "scary" where it stands for here, with other colors the association is also quite different, which is exactly why there are different cultural backgrounds for the " Sensation "of color.

Andreas
 

eronald

Well-known member
Hi,

the Japanese are very fond of Leica binoculars; sales in the 80s and 90s were significantly higher than that of Zeiss binoculars.

Basically, more saturated colors are preferred in Japan, Nikon has taken up the tradition and copied the color balance of the Leica's.
In terms of color matching, the EDG are actually identical to the old Trinovids.

Colors have a meaning insofar as they are subject to different cultural and historical evaluations, black is not the "dark" and "scary" where it stands for here, with other colors the association is also quite different, which is exactly why there are different cultural backgrounds for the " Sensation "of color.

Andreas
I agree about the cultural aspects. And indeed in consumer space the preferred tints aren't static - one can see that the color rendering of the latest Canon and Sony cameras has also changed completely over the past few years to be much more "western". Maybe Kamakura will generally copy Leica, and then we will get Conquests with Leica color :)

It seems people's tastes can change too in music. Here is a song which Angela Merkel selected to be played by a military band for her official goodbyes


The alternative, previous rendering is here

Edmund
 
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