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Is IS for the birds? (3 Viewers)

peter.jones

Registered User
Supporter
I use the Canon 10x42 pretty much all the time and this is not my experience at all. It's extremely easy to carry around two AA batteries. I change batteries probably every 3-4 days of birding. Even if the battery does run out and I have no spares on me, I still have an excellent (if heavy) pair of 10x42s. The binoculars are not 'battery-operated'. The IS is.

That's fine, I like that idea. But at least one of these models, can't remember which, the Nikon 10x25? only works with IS on. I.e. battery operated

Battery operated binoculars definitely isn't for the birds. Or at least not for the birds in remote places!

If it works with rechargeable AAs: eneloop pro seem pretty good for holding their charge when not in use. My gadgets all run on them!
 
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kabsetz

Well-known member
Andrew has it nailed, the IS is battery operated in the Canon 10+x42, not the binocular.

I have used Lithium batteries, which even in heavy use last for weeks, and now use Eneloop X rechargeables, which I tend to charge before they fail, maybe every week or two. No problem with batteries.

Optically, as binoculars without IS engaged, they are alpha level despite what many here say. FoV is wide-angle but not ultra-wide, and everything else is either tops or very nearly tops. The early production did not yet have particularly high light transmission, but coatings have been improved along the way, and current ones are close to 90%. Image is sharp to the edge, close to Swaro EL or NL pure level. Stray light protection is excellent, with very little veiling glare. My unit has much less SA than most alphas by the big three. Resolution measured with a booster and test targets is on level with a EL 10x50 SV.

The whole package is such that even if it weighed and cost more, I would happily continue using it. If one finds it too heavy to hold, it is well worth the effort to do arm exercises rather than settling with a lighter binocular. And one can always take a selfie stick, thread it to the tripod thread under the binocular, and enter the magical world of finnstick users whose arms never tire.

Kimmo
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
I'd like to see an extra wide field 'alpha' level lightweight switch power IS binocular - say 7.5x43 & 14.5x43 with the option of engaging IS at the higher power.

I want it to have weight and ergonomics the equal of the 42mm Nikon MHG or better. I know I'd be happy !

Anyone have a different wishlist ??









Chosun :gh:
 

Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
Beth. Have you ever tried any of the IS binoculars? The Nikon 10x25 IS might suit you. Probably not quite the optics or FOV of your Nikon HG 8x30 but the IS helps with the shakes.

I don't think it would work with my glasses. ER is listed at 14mm and then there's the 2.5mm exit pupil.

Never tried any IS binos. The smaller ones have small EP and/or ER and the bigger ones are bulky and heavy. I'll wait until they evolve some more to the point they look and feel more like traditional binos with sufficient ER and lighter weight.
 
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[email protected]

Well-known member
Alexis - That 2.5mm EP is not going to work for me with my glasses - I don't think I'd like to drop below ~3.2 and even that is finnicky .....






Chosun :gh:
Chosun. If have never tried IS binoculars you will find they have another advantage besides not shaking as much. Your eye placement is easier because the exit pupil is not moving around as much. You may only have a 2.5 mm exit pupil with the Nikon 10x25 IS but it STAYS over your eyes better than a regular compact because it is not moving all over the place. That is a big reason I like the little Nikon 10x25 IS better than any other compacts I have tried. They are way less finicky than other compacts.
 
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[email protected]

Well-known member
I think the quality of top range bins, with the option of turning on IS, no one would complain.
But a battery operated binocular is not what's needed. In addition to the obvious problem of running out of batteries in the middle of nowhere, people's binocular use would be influenced by the battery life.. you'd become a less diligent birder.
You could say the same for your cell phone or camera. Would you do without them because they have a battery? More and more and things in this digital age are going to have batteries and I have no doubt digital binoculars are coming, and we will all have batteries in our binoculars. Digital binoculars in the future will be plug in rechargeable just like your phone and have enhancements and zoom capabilities that you never dreamed of.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
That's fine, I like that idea. But at least one of these models, can't remember which, the Nikon 10x25? only works with IS on. I.e. battery operated

Battery operated binoculars definitely isn't for the birds. Or at least not for the birds in remote places!

If it works with rechargeable AAs: eneloop pro seem pretty good for holding their charge when not in use. My gadgets all run on them!
"Battery operated binoculars definitely isn't for the birds. Or at least not for the birds in remote places!"

Do you take your cell phone or camera to remote places?
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
I'd like to see an extra wide field 'alpha' level lightweight switch power IS binocular - say 7.5x43 & 14.5x43 with the option of engaging IS at the higher power.

I want it to have weight and ergonomics the equal of the 42mm Nikon MHG or better. I know I'd be happy !

Anyone have a different wishlist ??









Chosun :gh:
Something like that would probably be too complex for a electro-mechanical IS binocular like the Canon 10x42 IS-L. Look at how complex it already is with just one magnification! Stuff like you are talking about will be accomplished with digital technology. There will be continuous zooms and many optical enhancements. You will be able to adjust the contrast, color and brightness with the press of a button. Just like your digital TV.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Andrew has it nailed, the IS is battery operated in the Canon 10+x42, not the binocular.

I have used Lithium batteries, which even in heavy use last for weeks, and now use Eneloop X rechargeables, which I tend to charge before they fail, maybe every week or two. No problem with batteries.

Optically, as binoculars without IS engaged, they are alpha level despite what many here say. FoV is wide-angle but not ultra-wide, and everything else is either tops or very nearly tops. The early production did not yet have particularly high light transmission, but coatings have been improved along the way, and current ones are close to 90%. Image is sharp to the edge, close to Swaro EL or NL pure level. Stray light protection is excellent, with very little veiling glare. My unit has much less SA than most alphas by the big three. Resolution measured with a booster and test targets is on level with a EL 10x50 SV.

The whole package is such that even if it weighed and cost more, I would happily continue using it. If one finds it too heavy to hold, it is well worth the effort to do arm exercises rather than settling with a lighter binocular. And one can always take a selfie stick, thread it to the tripod thread under the binocular, and enter the magical world of finnstick users whose arms never tire.

Kimmo
Kimmo. I agree with everything you said. The Canon 10x42 IS-L is every bit as good optically or at least very close to the SV 10x50 because I had them both at the same time and compared them many times. In fact I sold the SV 10x50 because it wasn't any better than the Canon. Although I know the Canon 10x42 IS-L is optically the best of the Canon line with it's ED glass I prefer the 12x36 IS III and the 18x50 IS for my use because they give me the higher magnification I like for long range Pelagic birding and astronomical use. I did get sharper stars with the Canon 10x42 IS-L especially on the edges but the higher magnification helps more observing lunar detail and the bigger aperture of the 18x50 IS allows me to go deeper into the sky. I also like the Canon 18x50 IS for Pelagic birding again for the higher magnification. I get a much better view of the Orion Nebulae or the Pleiades Cluster or ESPECIALLY the moon with my Canon 12x36 IS III than I do with my Swarovski NL 8x42. No contest.
 

peter.jones

Registered User
Supporter
"Battery operated binoculars definitely isn't for the birds. Or at least not for the birds in remote places!"

Do you take your cell phone or camera to remote places?

Yes, and yes, and GPS, and sound recorder. And if any run out of battery it's a pain, but not the end of the world. But binoculars running out of battery and shutting down, well that's a complete show stopper.

I'm sorry I'd never consider this particular model which needs battery to function. I'm ok with ones that "fail safe" and can be used without the battery though. Just my opinion.
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
Something like that would probably be too complex for a electro-mechanical IS binocular like the Canon 10x42 IS-L. Look at how complex it already is with just one magnification! Stuff like you are talking about will be accomplished with digital technology. There will be continuous zooms and many optical enhancements. You will be able to adjust the contrast, color and brightness with the press of a button. Just like your digital TV.
Hey a 'production' car just tore up a Nevada highway at an average speed of over 500km/h. Musk is planning a launch to Mars in 2024. We are only talking about a stabilized Switch Power binocular here - I'm sure it's doable.

There is no need for an optical "zoom" - just a low magnication position, and a high magnification position. It's still an optical observation device.

I'm sure the full digital, fully truly zooming with all the bells and whistles jobbie will come as well - but that's a separate thing. Currently EVF'S are up to 9.4 Million dots, or a refresh rate of 120fps. Wake me up when it gets to 10x that resolution. ......







Chosun :gh:
 

etudiant

Well-known member
There is no need for an optical "zoom" - just a low magnication position, and a high magnification position. It's still an optical observation device.

I'm sure the full digital, fully truly zooming with all the bells and whistles jobbie will come as well - but that's a separate thing. Currently EVF'S are up to 9.4 Million dots, or a refresh rate of 120fps. Wake me up when it gets to 10x that resolution. ......
Chosun :gh:

Hi Chosun,
OLEDs with potentially 10,000 ppi, (versus about 500 ppi on a decent phone) are in the research stage, so you won't have to wait too long:
https://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/consumer-electronics/audiovideo/metasurface-oled-display
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
I received the Fujinon 14x40 Techno-Stabi binoculars and I have never tried them in the past because I have always heard the Canon IS system is better for birding. Well don't believe rumors because the Fujinon IS system is superior to the Canon IS mainly because it doesn't soften when you press the IS button like it does on the Canon. When you compare the Fujinon IS side by side with the Canon IS system and I used a Canon 12x36 IS III and a Canon 18x50 IS to compare it with you can see that the Canons image softens compared to the Fujinon which retains its resolution even with the IS on. The Fujinon IS also is steadier than the Canon IS being almost rock steady, whereas, the Canon IS is jiggling and moving much more. I much preferred the Fujinon for this reason. Also, the Fujinon has much less CA than the Canons and it is very obvious when trying to read black lettering on a white sign. The Canon has obvious CA around the lettering but the Fujinon is much cleaner. The Fujinon must use some kind of ED glass. I don't like the square "brick like"shape of some IS binoculars like the Canon 10x42 IS-L and this Fujinon because it makes it hard to hold them compared to a regular binocular but Fujinon had a good idea putting a hand strap on the side of the bino because you put your hand through it and you can hold the binoculars with one hand. It makes a heavy square IS binocular tolerable. The Fujinon is heavy at 44 oz. but that is only 4 oz. heavier than the Canon 10x42 IS-L and that is with 4 AA batteries in it. Here is a review by the infamous Ken Rockwell On the Fujinon 14x40 Techno-Stabi binoculars. The Fujinon also comes with a nice Pelican case so it is a pretty good deal. It looks like a Canon 10x42 IS-L doesn't it?

https://www.kenrockwell.com/fuji/fujinon-14x40.htm
 

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[email protected]

Well-known member
"We are only talking about a stabilized Switch Power binocular here - I'm sure it's doable."

It may be doable but I don't see Canon doing it when they won't even make any significant updates to the Canon 10x42 IS-L.
 

WimDel

Active member
I just sold my Canon 10x42 after acquiring the NL 10x42. I used them ten years for birding. They gave me great stabilised views but in the end I was tired of lugging them around. They became too heavy and cumbersome for me. With the NL, stabilisation is the only thing I mis. That became obvious when I was stargazing last night. While the FRP makes eye placement easier, for me it does not offer much extra ‘stabilisation’. It is certainly not a substitute for ‘real’ stabilisation. There is no comparison between a handheld and a stabilised view. I guess I’ll have to mount the NL on a tripod for that...
 

Sancho

Well-known member
I'm in full agreement with Andrew and Kimmo. I'm on my second IS10x42. With the first pair, I wavered, then sold them, on the basis of ergonomics. But I've never found a comparable view, and last year relentecd and bought a second. I carry them with strap across chest and under arm. Batteries are not
problem. There's even a little internal pocket in the case for spares. Over the last twenty years I've owned and sold all the other Canon IS models. The 10x42 are optically perfect for me. But one has to decide if the trade off in weight etc. works. If I don't want to carry them on casual walks, etc., I bring pocket binos. I have no real 'usage window' now for mid size 8x binos, my pocket Swaro 8x20 and my Canon IS 10x42 cover all the bases....for me.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
I just sold my Canon 10x42 after acquiring the NL 10x42. I used them ten years for birding. They gave me great stabilised views but in the end I was tired of lugging them around. They became too heavy and cumbersome for me. With the NL, stabilisation is the only thing I mis. That became obvious when I was stargazing last night. While the FRP makes eye placement easier, for me it does not offer much extra ‘stabilisation’. It is certainly not a substitute for ‘real’ stabilisation. There is no comparison between a handheld and a stabilised view. I guess I’ll have to mount the NL on a tripod for that...
Exactly! That is what I found. That is why the only other binoculars I have in my collection are IS. Nothing really can beat the NL except an IS when it comes to detail. The forehead rest didn't really help me either with my NL 8x42. Now if they could make a NL with IS that WOULD be something!
 
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[email protected]

Well-known member
I'm in full agreement with Andrew and Kimmo. I'm on my second IS10x42. With the first pair, I wavered, then sold them, on the basis of ergonomics. But I've never found a comparable view, and last year relentecd and bought a second. I carry them with strap across chest and under arm. Batteries are not
problem. There's even a little internal pocket in the case for spares. Over the last twenty years I've owned and sold all the other Canon IS models. The 10x42 are optically perfect for me. But one has to decide if the trade off in weight etc. works. If I don't want to carry them on casual walks, etc., I bring pocket binos. I have no real 'usage window' now for mid size 8x binos, my pocket Swaro 8x20 and my Canon IS 10x42 cover all the bases....for me.
The Canon 10x42 IS-L are sensational optically but you have to decide if you can tolerate the weight and brick like square shape. The weight REALLY gets to you on a long hike but you have solved the problem by taking compacts on longer hikes. Sancho, you might try the Canon 8x20 IS or Nikon 10x25 IS for your hikes. They are both small and under 14 oz. and very good optically. I have both of them for hikes.
 

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