• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

Wasp behaviour and ID (1 Viewer)

thomasclark1985

Well-known member
Hi,

I was on Aylesbeare RSPB reserve in Devon the other day, and witnessed a small wasp riding on the back of a larger wasp, carrying a weevil.... the smaller wasp was persistently smashing the larger wasp (with weevil) into the ground and wrestling with it, whilst another wasp was attacking all 3 of them. The smaller one riding on the back of the larger one eventually won the epic battle after a few mins and managed to bundle the larger wasp and weevil into a hole and job done, flew off.

Any ideas what was going on? also an ID would be nice.
 

Attachments

  • P1090062.JPG
    P1090062.JPG
    363.2 KB · Views: 32
  • P1090069.JPG
    P1090069.JPG
    318.7 KB · Views: 22

Max S.

Well-known member
I don't know what species occur in the UK, but what you have on your photos is a pair of Cerceris sp.
Not too sure on what's happening though. Maybe the male was trying to mate?
 

thomasclark1985

Well-known member
Thanks Max, I’ll have a look at which Cerceris sp. we get here when I have time. I presumed the smaller was a Male and larger was female so I wondered whether it was attempted mating, but the weevil threw me off, and then the way it forced them into the hole/burrow.

Cheers,

Tom
 

thomasclark1985

Well-known member
Hi Max,

It might be this Cerceris arenaria (Sand Tailed Digger Wasp), it fits the habitat and Naturespot quotes -

"The prey species are various weevils. Nests are deep burrows dug in the soil, from which side-tunnels radiate leading to cells at depths of 20 to 25 cm. In sandy areas, dense aggregations containing thousands of nests may form. Each cell is provisioned with 3 to 14 weevils, the number depending on prey size and sex of offspring."

Cheers,

Tom
 
Warning! This thread is more than 4 years ago old.
It's likely that no further discussion is required, in which case we recommend starting a new thread. If however you feel your response is required you can still do so.

Users who are viewing this thread

Top