Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Zeiss - Always on the lookout for something special – Shop now

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

wood warblers

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old Tuesday 25th April 2006, 21:07   #1
terryeyre
Registered User
 
terryeyre's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: alton staffordshire
Posts: 17,643
wood warblers

managed a few photos of a wood warbler today,a rare sight in these parts,are they rare all over the uk?
terry
terryeyre is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 28th April 2006, 14:25   #2
Capercaillie71
Registered User
 
Capercaillie71's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Deeside, Aberdeenshire
Posts: 3,172
They are very much a bird associated with western oak woods and become scarcer the further east you go. I think they have also declined in numbers in recent years. Here is their breeding distribution from the 1976 and 1993 bird atlases:

http://blx1.bto.org/atlases/WO-comp.html
Capercaillie71 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 28th April 2006, 14:30   #3
Rob Smallwood
Registered User
 
Rob Smallwood's Avatar

 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Greater Manchester
Posts: 3,317
Local perhaps rather than rare - but a few singing birds in the N/W away from traditional grounds (e.g. Marbury CP in Cheshire) have delighted local birders.
__________________
Rob
"Thirty years ago I knew nothing about birding. Today I know enough to know that I know very little"
Rob Smallwood is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2010 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Friday 28th April 2006, 14:34   #4
London Birder
Registered User
 
London Birder's Avatar

 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: London
Posts: 3,335
regular passage bird in London...particularly central London, oddly enough
London Birder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 28th April 2006, 19:03   #5
Rob Stroker
pud, chips and gravy luv

 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: uk
Posts: 58
Maybe it's the mature trees london. Out of interest what kind and age of trees age do they frequent.
ps. happy birthday aswell
Rob Stroker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 28th April 2006, 19:10   #6
Adey Baker
Member
 
Adey Baker's Avatar

 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Hinckley, Leics
Posts: 4,991
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capercaillie71
They are very much a bird associated with western oak woods and become scarcer the further east you go. I think they have also declined in numbers in recent years. Here is their breeding distribution from the 1976 and 1993 bird atlases:

http://blx1.bto.org/atlases/WO-comp.html
There's quite a noticeable reduction there below a line from the Severn to The Wash - I wonder, is the habitat becoming unsuitable or is this just a general contraction in range concentrating them back into their 'core' area?
Adey Baker is online now  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2006 2007 2009 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Friday 28th April 2006, 19:11   #7
London Birder
Registered User
 
London Birder's Avatar

 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: London
Posts: 3,335
cheers Rob ... well, the hotspot for them is Regents (annual spring singer, occasionally multiple singers) seen them singing there from Oak, Lime and London Plane (no understorey), on my patch (Kensington Gardens) there are many very old standard oaks which they have, so far, favoured (not that I've had too many there as yet)
London Birder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 28th April 2006, 19:20   #8
dbradnum
Registered User
 
dbradnum's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Epping Forest, NE London
Posts: 3,082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adey Baker
There's quite a noticeable reduction there below a line from the Severn to The Wash - I wonder, is the habitat becoming unsuitable or is this just a general contraction in range concentrating them back into their 'core' area?
My guess would be a range contraction (though no idea why)... in Norfolk, they used to be a regular scarce breeding bird until about ten years ago. The habitat's still there, but they're now a pretty tricky bird to catch up with on passage in the county.
__________________

David

(Visit my blog!)
dbradnum is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2006 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Saturday 29th April 2006, 14:50   #9
Ruby
Registered User
 
Ruby's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Surrey, UK
Posts: 2,308
I've had cause to look up the occurence of Wood Warblers as Spring passage migrants in Kent, and they seem to average out of about 10 sightings per year over the years 1996 - 2003. I'm unaware of any breeding sites - there either aren't any these days, or they're kept pretty quiet....
Ruby is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 29th April 2006, 16:58   #10
JohnnyH
Aldershot till I die!
 
JohnnyH's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Aldershot, N.E Hants
Posts: 1,192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruby
I've had cause to look up the occurence of Wood Warblers as Spring passage migrants in Kent, and they seem to average out of about 10 sightings per year over the years 1996 - 2003. I'm unaware of any breeding sites - there either aren't any these days, or they're kept pretty quiet....
Hi Ruby,

There's still one or two haunts left in Surrey, although still pretty difficult to find.

Cheers,

John.
JohnnyH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 29th April 2006, 19:40   #11
terryeyre
Registered User
 
terryeyre's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: alton staffordshire
Posts: 17,643
the local woods around here used to be full of wood warblers,but just the odd one for the last 3 years,i wonder if there decline is been caused in the wintering grounds,over the same period willow warbler,chiffchaff and blackcap have increased in numbers i would say.
terryeyre is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 29th April 2006, 19:55   #12
Stewart J.
Registered User
 
Stewart J.'s Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Southwest Northumberland UK
Posts: 4,404
Localised but fairly common in suitable habitat here in SW Northumberland.

Stewart
Stewart J. is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2007 2010 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 30th April 2006, 16:04   #13
jackied
Jax
 
jackied's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Worcester, England
Posts: 455
Heard one singing in the Wyre Forest yesterday, As far as I know, only one was reported from this site last year, a definite decline on previous years.
Jackie
jackied is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2011 2012 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 30th April 2006, 19:31   #14
Collster
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Wales
Posts: 1,742
A few pairs always nest in the local woods but recent years numbers have been down
Collster is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 6th May 2006, 14:16   #15
terryeyre
Registered User
 
terryeyre's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: alton staffordshire
Posts: 17,643
the single male still singing in the same area today.
terryeyre is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 7th May 2006, 07:07   #16
jackied
Jax
 
jackied's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Worcester, England
Posts: 455
4 singing in the Wyre Forest yesterday, perhaps this year will be a better year for them after all.
jackie
jackied is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2011 2012 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 7th May 2006, 19:44   #17
Karl J
Registered User
 
Karl J's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: eastest Norfolk
Posts: 2,362
3 in recent days near the east coast / Norfolk-Suffolk border singing, unless anyone knows of more (?),

Would this be more than usual ? ...in what i've read is not a good area for them

Last edited by Karl J : Sunday 7th May 2006 at 19:48.
Karl J is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 2008 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Monday 8th May 2006, 08:22   #18
Jane Turner
Registered User
 
Jane Turner's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Hoylake, Merseyside
Posts: 22,934
Wood Warbler is one of those species that mostly seems to bypass coastal watch points and just turns up miraculously on breeding grounds!
__________________

Last Cheshire Pied Wheatear (313) last Red Rocks Subalpine Warbler (260), last Garden Bonaparte's Gull (209), last Self-found Citrine Wagtail (294)
Jane Turner is online now  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Monday 8th May 2006, 08:35   #19
Andrew Whitehouse
Professor of Listening
BF Supporter 2019
 
Andrew Whitehouse's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Aberdeen
Posts: 20,092
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane Turner
Wood Warbler is one of those species that mostly seems to bypass coastal watch points and just turns up miraculously on breeding grounds!
Very true, although growing up in the Midlands I used to get Wood Warblers on spring passage most years. Probably at least as regular migrants in those areas as say Redstart or Pied Fly.

Also, a couple of years ago we had some big falls in August after some particularly severe weather. I think I saw 3 or 4 Wood Warblers at Fife Ness then - they were even commoner than Greenish Warblers (and I suspect from the same sorts of areas)!
__________________
Andrew

Listening to Birds
Andrew Whitehouse is online now  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Monday 8th May 2006, 09:04   #20
Jane Turner
Registered User
 
Jane Turner's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Hoylake, Merseyside
Posts: 22,934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Whitehouse
Very true, although growing up in the Midlands I used to get Wood Warblers on spring passage most years. Probably at least as regular migrants in those areas as say Redstart or Pied Fly.

Also, a couple of years ago we had some big falls in August after some particularly severe weather. I think I saw 3 or 4 Wood Warblers at Fife Ness then - they were even commoner than Greenish Warblers (and I suspect from the same sorts of areas)!
When you do bump into one on say the East coast though, they look as rare as Arctic Warblers!
__________________

Last Cheshire Pied Wheatear (313) last Red Rocks Subalpine Warbler (260), last Garden Bonaparte's Gull (209), last Self-found Citrine Wagtail (294)
Jane Turner is online now  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Monday 8th May 2006, 19:12   #21
ChinaBirds
Nick Sismey
 
ChinaBirds's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Derby
Posts: 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by terryeyre
managed a few photos of a wood warbler today,a rare sight in these parts,are they rare all over the uk?
terry
None in Goyt Valley, Derbyshire yesterday, this time last year there were at least three singing, may be they are taking longer to return!

Cheers
Nick
ChinaBirds is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 9th May 2006, 18:40   #22
chris w
Registered User

 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Staverton, Devon
Posts: 57
There is at least one pair in Yarner Wood, Devon although this is a marked reduction on a few years ago.
chris w is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th May 2006, 12:24   #23
StevieEvans
Forum Member

 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 4,093
Unhappy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capercaillie71
They are very much a bird associated with western oak woods and become scarcer the further east you go. I think they have also declined in numbers in recent years. Here is their breeding distribution from the 1976 and 1993 bird atlases:

http://blx1.bto.org/atlases/WO-comp.html
Last year we only managed 3 singing birds in semi natural oakwoodland

In early '90s same wood had a max of 18 singing birds, so a bit of a crash here.

Although i did hear someone say they tend to occur in cycles (not ON cycles)
....?

SteveE
StevieEvans is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th May 2006, 23:12   #24
tom24
Registered User
 
tom24's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Scotland
Posts: 384
There's plenty in the Glentrool/Wood of Cree area Dumfries and Galloway region today (Wed.10/05).
Tom.
tom24 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 11th May 2006, 00:16   #25
nirofo
Registered User
 
nirofo's Avatar

 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: North Scotland
Posts: 1,545
They used to be in nearly all the birch woods in the far north of scotland, just one or two pairs left now!

nirofo.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Wood Warbler.jpg
Views:	161
Size:	219.1 KB
ID:	45878  

Last edited by nirofo : Friday 12th May 2006 at 13:30.
nirofo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[B]Field Guide to Warblers (North America)[/B] Andy1 Books, Magazines, Publications, Video & DVD 3 Friday 25th November 2011 00:44
Greenish Warblers, like Palla's and Yellow-Browed Warblers? RockyRacoon Birds & Birding 7 Monday 26th September 2005 22:16
Wood Warblers doing well in Suffolk? Brian Stone Birds & Birding 0 Wednesday 26th May 2004 21:06
Finally some more warblers! prairiemerlin Your Birding Day 3 Tuesday 11th May 2004 11:21
A morning in a Liverpool Suburban Wood Ben Dickinson Your Birding Day 8 Saturday 1st May 2004 13:49



Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.19465995 seconds with 38 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 21:39.