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Old Friday 5th June 2020, 10:09   #1
James Jobling
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BOW Key

BOW Key
I have reached agreement with Cornell, and the content of the HBWAlive Key as at 11 May 2020 has been passed to them for development and inclusion in Birds of the World (BOW). The time-scale for this is complicated, so no completion date can be given at present.
In the meantime I am still updating my Key MS. Minor additions, erreurs de frappe, comments on substantive names, etc., will not be shown, but important new material obtained since 11 May will be given in this thread. Edited as necessary, this will all be incorporated into the BOWKey in due course. The following are some recent entries;

bairdi
• Robert F. Baird (fl. 1992) Australian palaeontologist (‡ Centropus).
fordi
• Dr Julian Ralph Ford (1932-1987) Australian chemist, ornithologist (‡Pycnoptilus (Fred Ruhe in litt.), subsp. Scythrops novaehollandiae (Björn Bergenholtz in litt.)).
GARRDIMALGA
‡ (Megapodiidae; † Limestone Megapode G. mcnamarai) Curramulka Quarry, Curramulka, Yorke Peninsula, South Australia; "Garrdimalga Shute, Prideaux & Worthy, gen. nov. ... Type species: Garrdimalga mcnamarai Shute, Prideaux & Worthy sp. nov by monotypy. Etymology: Garrdimalga, from which the name of the type locality derives means 'emu waterhole' (garrdi, emu; malga, limestone/white waterhole) in the local Narungga (Nharangga) Aboriginal language of the Yorke Peninsula, South Australia. Originally referring to a limestone depression where emus came to drink, the name, written as Curramulka, was latter extended to the whole of the nearby township." (Shute, Prideaux & Worthy 2017).
Hydrozetetes
(?syn. Myiothlypis † Southern Riverbank Warbler M. rivularis) Gr. ὑδρο- hudro- water- < ὑδωρ hudōr, ὑδατος hudatos water; ζητητης zētētēs searcher < ζητεω zēteō to seek; "TODIDÆ ... b. Tænioptereæ ... 1355. Cnipolegus, Boie. - 1356. Ada, Less. - *1357. Hydrozetetes, Schiff. - 1358. Lichenops, Commerson. - 1359. Muscigralla, Lafr. (Ochthites, Caban.)" (Bonaparte 1854); "811. PHILOTHERUS, Kaup, 1851 ... [APPENDIX] 811. = Hydrozetetes, Schiff. 1854?" (G. Gray 1855) (Laurent Raty in litt.).
LATAGALLINA
‡ (Megapodiidae; † Naracoorte Megapode L. naracoortensis) "Latagallina Shute, Prideaux & Worthy, gen. nov. ... Type species: Progura naracoortensis van Tets, 1974 ... Etymology: Latagallina = 'broad hen' (lata = 'broad', adjective, Latin; gallina = 'hen', noun, Latin). The name Latagallina refers to the stout, short-legged build of members of this genus. Gender is feminine." (Shute, Prideaux & Worthy 2017).
luciae
• Lucy Ashton Boosey née Whitehead (1866-1941) sister of explorer John Whitehead and wife of music publisher Arthur Boosey (Mark Brown in litt.) (subsp. Otus spilocephalus).
mcnamarai
Jim McNamara (fl. 2001) Australian palaeontologist (‡Garrdimalga).
Philotherus
(syn. Myiothlypis † Southern Riverbank Warbler M. rivularis) Gr. φιλοθηρος philothēros fond of hunting < φιλοθηρεω philothēreō to be fond of hunting; "811. PHILOTHERUS, Kaup, 1851. (Muscicapa rivularis, Vieill.)" (G. Gray 1855) (Laurent Raty in litt.)
SYRTIDICOLA
(Tyrannidae; † Little Ground Tyrant S. fluviatilis) L. Syrtis, Syrtidos a sandbank < Gr. Συρτις Surtis, Συρτιδος Surtidos shallow bays on the coast of Libya, renowned for their sandbanks and quicksands; -cola dweller < colere to inhabit; "when combined with the species name fluviatilis (riverine), indicates that this species inhabits sandbars along rivers." (Chesser et al. 2020).
woodi
• William Wightman Wood (fl. 1870) US journalist in China 1827-1833, naturalist, plantation manager, pioneer photographer in the Philippines (subsp. Mixornis gularis).

Last edited by James Jobling : Friday 5th June 2020 at 17:21. Reason: Cnipolegus
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Old Friday 5th June 2020, 10:48   #2
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..not only, but also:
Campocolinus
(syn. Peliperdix † Coqui Francolin P. coqui) L. campus, campi field, plain; Mod. L. colinus quail (cf. genus Colinus Goldfuss, 1820, bobwhite). Some readers regard this name as unpublished.
escondidus
Spanish escondido hidden < esconder to hide (cf. escondidos hide-and-seek).
lowi
• Surgeon-Maj. Dr George Carmichael Low (1872-1952) Scottish parasitologist, co-founder (1907) of the Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, ornithologist (Jan van der Brugge in litt.) (syn. Jacana spinosa gymnostoma).
Osalia
(syn. Chaetocercus † Rufous-shafted Woodstar C. jourdanii) Etymology undiscovered; in keeping with other coinages by these authors this name may refer to a saint or hero of France, but (Mark Brown in litt.) it may be a misprint for Rosalia (see rosae); "Genre ORNISMIA, Ornismie; LESSON. ... dd. Rectrices à baguettes rousses (S.-g. Osalia.). Jourdani, BOURCIER. Bolivie. ... Rosæ, BOURC. et MULS. Venezuela." (Mulsant, J. Verreaux & E. Verreaux 1866).
posneri
Félix Posner (b. 1873) Hungarian taxidermist, collector in Paraguay 1906-1922 (Jan van der Brugge in litt.) (syn. Sporophila ruficollis).
Rauenia
(syn. Pipraeidea † Blue-and-yellow Tanager P. bonariensis) Johannes Rau (1931-2006) German politician, Minister-President of North Rhine-Westphalia 1978-1998, President of Germany 1999-2004 (Björn Bergenholtz in litt.); "GENUS Rauenia Wolters, 1980, IV1 Rauenia bonariensis (Gmel., 1789) - Furchentangare; E: Blue-and-yellow Tanager. - (Syn. stricta) ... 1 Rauenia gen. nov., Wolters. Struktuell ähnlich Thraupis Boie, 1826, bis auf den dickeren, seitlich geschwollenen Schnabel; Charakter der Gefiederzeichnung jedoch völlig abweichend, an Buthraupis, Bangsia usw, erinnernd: Kopf blau, Unterseite gold-gelb, Mantel schwarz oder oliv, schwarzer Zügelstreif. Typus, hier bezeichnet, Loxia bonariensis Gmelin, Syst. Nat., 1 (2), p. 850" (Wolters 1980, Die Vogelarten der Erde, pt. 5, 340) (OD per Björn Bergenholtz).
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Old Friday 5th June 2020, 18:20   #3
James Jobling
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..only a few more, for now...
Acanthilis
(syn. Spinus † Eurasian Siskin S. spinus) L. acanthyllis small unidentified bird < Gr. ακανθυλις akanthulis insect-eating bird that built a ball-shaped nest with a small entrance hole, linked with various species, but identified generally as a sort of finch; "ACANTHIS. (Ornith.) Un des noms latins du tarin, fringilla spinus. Certains auteurs le nomment aussi acanthus et acanthilis." (Dumont de Sainte-Croix 1816); "Acanthilis C. Dumont de Sainte-Croix in Levrault, 1816, Dictionnaire des Sciences Naturelles, éd. 2, I, Supplément, p. 12. Type, by monotypy, fringilla spinus = Fringilla Spinus Linnaeus." (mihi 2020).
diazfrancoi
Stephen Díaz-Franco (fl. 2020) Cuban archaeologist (‡Milvago).
itchei
Irving "Itche" Himel (1915-2001) Canadian QC, prominent civil liberties lawyer (P. Scofield in litt.) (‡Gigantohierax).
resinosus
L. resinosus resinous, full of resin < resina resin.
royi
Dr Roy Ernest Dickerson (1877-1944) US petroleum geologist, pioneer palaeontologist on Cuba (‡Buteogallus).
sanfelipensis
• Las Breas de San Felipe, Matanzas, Cuba (‡Buteo).
• Cayos de San Felipe, Pinar del Río, Cuba (‡subsp. Melanerpes superciliaris, subsp. Vireo gundlachii).
turmalis
L. turmalis of a troop or squadron < turma troop, crowd, throng.
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Old Friday 5th June 2020, 20:47   #4
l_raty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
Acanthilis
(syn. Spinus † Eurasian Siskin S. spinus) L. acanthyllis small unidentified bird < Gr. ακανθυλις akanthulis insect-eating bird that built a ball-shaped nest with a small entrance hole, linked with various species, but identified generally as a sort of finch; "ACANTHIS. (Ornith.) Un des noms latins du tarin, fringilla spinus. Certains auteurs le nomment aussi acanthus et acanthilis." (Dumont de Sainte-Croix 1816); "Acanthilis C. Dumont de Sainte-Croix in Levrault, 1816, Dictionnaire des Sciences Naturelles, éd. 2, I, Supplément, p. 12. Type, by monotypy, fringilla spinus = Fringilla Spinus Linnaeus." (mihi 2020).
In my notes, I have decided not to call this a scientific name. The scientific name that he adopts for the species is clearly Fringilla spinus, and nothing else. For the rest, I think he merely intended to report that some Latin authors had used these names.
Compare to Sonnini, some 13 years earlier: https://books.google.com/books?id=-d...&dq=acanthilis -- I think the meaning is equivalent.
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Old Friday 5th June 2020, 21:37   #5
James Jobling
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Laurent,
Thanks for this. I agree that Acanthilis is merely a Latin substantive name, and should be removed from the Key, as should the relevant entries for Acanthis and Acanthus in so far as they relate to Spinus spinus.
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Old Saturday 6th June 2020, 12:58   #6
Calalp
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Dr Baird's long-lost Coucal

Here's some minor additional info (nothing contradictory), regarding ...

bairdi as in:
• the extinct and flightless (Pleistocene) Coucal Centropus bairdi SHUTE, PRIDEAUX & WORTHY 2016 (here, click on 'Read Paper'):
Quote:
Etymology
Named in honour of Dr Robert F. Baird, who described Australia’s first extinct species of Centropus in 1985, and who worked extensively on the Quaternary bird fossil record of Australia, including fossil cave faunas in the Nullarbor region.


[on p.979]
... to me it looks like Dr Robert (F.) Baird, "BSc (Hons), PhD, GAICD " ... is still going, still working, today as Director at Biosis Pty Ltd, in Melbourne, Australia. (see here and here). Looking happy and content.

Earlier; Executive Manager (at/of/for) University of Melbourne, School of Earth Sciences (1994-1996), Acting Director/Coordinator at the Victorian Institute of Earth and Planetary Sciences (1990-1994), etc., etc., also Honorary associate, Department of Ornithology, Museum of Victoria.

Surely it ought to be him?

Björn

PS. Just curious, James; are you now also including Pleistocene taxa in your Key MS? I thought you had a Holocene limit for fossil/sub-fossil birds ...
--

Last edited by Calalp : Saturday 6th June 2020 at 18:34.
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Old Saturday 6th June 2020, 14:20   #7
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Must be him.

The avian portions of the Quaternary cave deposits of southern Australia and their biogeographical and palaeoenvironmental interpretations (Ph.D.)--Monash University, 1986.
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Old Saturday 6th June 2020, 14:34   #8
Calalp
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More about "Bob" Baird; here (in 1993, p.10), or here.

According to here (in 1991), and here (in 2018) his PhD Thesis (of 1986) seem to be unpublished.

Either way; I feel pretty certain it's him all right!

/B
--

Last edited by Calalp : Saturday 6th June 2020 at 22:05. Reason: latter two links
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Old Saturday 6th June 2020, 17:32   #9
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Robert F. Baird wrote several papers and named several taxa of interest to us:

Robert F. Baird, 1984
The Pleistocene Distribution of the Tasmanian native-hen Gallinula mortierii mortierii
Emu 84: 119-123

Robert F. Baird, 1985
Avian Fossils from Quaternary Deposits on ‘Green Waterhole Cave’, Southeastern South Australia
Records of the Australian Museum 37: 353-370
Describing Centropus colossus and Orthonyx hypsilophus

Robert F. Baird, 1986
Tasmanian Native-Hen Gallinula mortierii: The First Late Pleistocene Record from Queensland
Emu 86: 121-122

Robert F. Baird, 1989
Fossil Bird Assemblages from Australian Caves: Precise Indicators of Late Quaternary Palaeoenvironments?
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeocology 69: 241-244

Robert F. Baird, 1991
Holocene Avian Assemblage from Skull Cave (AU-8), South-western Western Australia
Records of the Western Australian Museum 15: 267-286

Robert F. Baird, 1991
Avian Fossils from the Quatenary of Australia
in: The Vertebrate Palaeontology of Australasia
Ed:: Vickers Rich, J. Monaghan, R. F. Baird & T. H. Rich
Pioneer Design Studio and Monash University Publications Comittee, Lilydale: 809-870

Robert F. Baird, 1992
Fossil Avian Assemblages of Pitfall Origin from Holocene Sediments in Amphitheatre Cave (G-2), South-Western Victoria, Australia
Records of the Australian Museum 44: 21-44

Robert F. Baird, 1993
Pleistocene Avian Fossils from Pyramids Cave (M-89), Eastern Victoria, Australia
Alcheringa 17: 383-404
In this he describes Orthonyx wakefieldi and Pycnoptilus fordi

Robert F. Baird & Patricia Vickers Rich, 1997
Eutreptodactylus itaboraiensis Gen. et Sp. Nov., an Early Cuckoo (Aves: Cuculidae) from the Late Paleocene of Brazil
Alcheringa 21: 123-127
Here thay describe Eutreptodactylus itaboraiensis

Robert F. Baird & Patricia Vickers Rich, 1998
Palaelodus (Aves: Palaelodidae) from the Middle to Late Cainozoic of Australia
Alcheringa 22: 135-151
They describe Palaelodus pledgei and Palaelodus wilsoni

Robert F. Baird & M. J. Rowley, 1990
Preservation of Avian Collagen in Australian Quaternary Cave Deposits
Palaeontology 33: 447-451

Gregory Charles McNamara & Robert F. Baird, 1991
A Late Pleistocene Geographical Range Extension for Gallinula mortierii (Aves, Gruiformes, Rallidae): Wyandotte Formation, Northern Queensland
Alcheringa 15: 176

Patricia Vickers Rich, J. M. Monaghan, Robert F. Baird & Ralphe E. Molnar, 1991
Vertebrate Palaeontology of Australia
Pioneer Design Studio 1460 pg

Fred
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Old Saturday 6th June 2020, 18:49   #10
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From the "old" Guide to Key Entries; "Nonetheless, the list of fossil and sub-fossil names included in the Key is probably incomplete. Initially inclined only to treat neospecies, i.e. modern birds known from reliable contemporary accounts, descriptions and illustrations, or remains found in middens, I am now persuaded to include those described from the Pleistocene as well as the current Holocene epochs, together forming the Quaternary period. Here, the catalogues of Pierce Brodkorb 1963-1978, and the lists of Tommy Tyrberg 2008, of Tommy Tyrberg, Markus Lagerqvist & Erling Jirle 2017, and of Fred Ruhe 2018, have been invaluable."
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Old Saturday 6th June 2020, 22:00   #11
Calalp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
Just curious, James; are you now also including Pleistocene taxa in your Key MS? I thought you had a Holocene limit for fossil/sub-fossil birds ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
From the "old" Guide to Key Entries; "Nonetheless, the list of fossil and sub-fossil names included in the Key is probably incomplete. Initially inclined only to treat neospecies, i.e. modern birds known from reliable contemporary accounts, descriptions and illustrations, or remains found in middens, I am now persuaded to include those described from the Pleistocene as well as the current Holocene epochs, together forming the Quaternary period. Here, the catalogues of Pierce Brodkorb 1963-1978, and the lists of Tommy Tyrberg 2008, of Tommy Tyrberg, Markus Lagerqvist & Erling Jirle 2017, and of Fred Ruhe 2018, have been invaluable."
Thanks, James, and sorry, my lapse in memory, it's the (Swedish) List by Tyrberg et al that's limited to Holocene taxa, not yours, neither is Fred's nor was the (many, long) lists of Brodkorb.

However, taking of limits; I must say; your Energy seems limitless!

Good luck also with the Quaternary birds!

Björn
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Old Tuesday 9th June 2020, 10:40   #12
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... more amendments and supplemental material ...
bifrons
L. bifrons, bifrontis with two faces; "If after forming its estimate of the intrinsic probabilities of the case the judgement can pronounce in favour of the view that the extinct bird stood well within the pale of the Apterygidæ while yet maintaining relations with the three-toed Ratitæ the name Metapteryx bifrons may seem somewhat appropriate, and provisionally this name is suggested." (DeVis 1892) (syn. Dromaius novaehollandiae ☼).

Calandra / calandra
Unattested L. calandra Calandra Lark < Gr. καλανδρος kalandros Calandra Lark (Eddie Germiquet in litt.).

CRYPTOPEZUS
(Grallariidae; † Speckle-breasted Antpitta C. nattereri) Gr. κρυπτος kruptos hidden, secret; πεζος pezos walker < πατεω pateō to walk (cf. genus Hylopezus Ridgway, 1909); "Given that phenotypic and ecological differences do not warrant merging H. nattereri into any other genus, and because there is no generic name available for H. nattereri, we describe herein a new genus for this Atlantic Forest endemic lineage, Cryptopezus gen. n." (Carneiro et al. 2018). This name has yet (June 2020) to be properly published under the rules of the ICZN (Laurent Raty in litt.).

itchei
Irving "Itche" Himel (b. 1936) Canadian businessman, philanthropist, birdwatcher who aided researcher William Suarez in Toronto (I. Himel per P. Scofield in litt.) (‡Gigantohierax).

LUCAR
(syn. Dumetella † Grey Catbird D. carolinensis) L. lucaris belonging to a grove < lucus wood, grove < lucere to shine; “Lucar lividus, apice nigra; the cat bird, or chicken bird ... Catesby, in his history of Carolina, speaking of the cat-bird (muscicapa vertice nigro) says, "They have but one note, which resembles the mewing of a cat;" a mistake very injurious to the fame of that bird; he, in reality, being one of our most eminent songsters, little inferior to the philomela or mock-bird; and, in some remarkable instances, perhaps, exceeds them both, in particular as a buffoon or mimick ... They are a kind of domestic bird during their spring and summer residence in Pennsylvania, building their nests in gardens and sheltering themselves in groves near the houses. They cause great trouble and vexation to hens that have broods of chickens, by imitating their distressing cries, in which they seem to enjoy much delight, and cause some amusement to persons who are diverted at such incidents.They are the first bird heard singing in the morning, even before break of day.” (Bartram 1792, 2nd ed.); "72. LUCAR CAROLINENSIS! That the diagnostic expression "apice nigra," is a slip for "vertice nigra" is seen on reference to p. 299, where further account of the cat bird is given. Bartram's specific name, commonly ascribed to Wilson, is antedated by the Linnæan; but his curious generic term is not so easily disposed of. It is exactly coëqual with the subsequent Felivox of Bonaparte, and Galeoscoptes of Cabanis; and, for those who place the cat-bird in the same genus with the mocking-birds, will be considered also equivalent to Mimus, Boie. What is to be done in this case? The name is probably meaningless, and in fact, looks like a misprint; but if all barbarous and meaningless names are to be excluded on these scores, the revolution in nomenclature would be very great. "Lucar" is no worse than "Jotha," which some years since occasioned the issue between Prof. E. Forbes and Dr. J. E. Gray. Lucar is a very nice point as it stands, and as such is commended to the consideration of ornithologists." (Coues 1875); "In addition to Brisson, however, there are some other authors whose generic names conform to the requirements of the International Code, and these authors, therefore, can qualify as binary authors. One of these whose names have been in this respect generally overlooked is William Bartram, whose Travels in North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida, published in 1791 [1st ed.], has become famous. Bartram's specific names are either nomina nuda or polynomial, so that these are in no sense usable. Some of them can be cited from later authors, such as Zimmerman or Mayer, but not from Bartram's own publications. His generic names, however, have been lost sight of except by Charles W. Richmond [1917], who cited most of those that are tenable in one of his lists of generic names. One of these generic names is Lucar Bartram, of which the type is by monotypy Muscicapa carolinensis Linnaeus. This, where first used on p. 290 bis [sic] of the Travels is included in the list of birds observed as "Lucar lividus, apice nigra; the cat bird, or chicken bird." There is a further description on pp. 299-301, and Catesby's name of the same bird ("muscicapa vertice nigro") is cited on p. 299. These citations, of course, validate the name, so Lucar becomes the proper name for our Catbird, and should replace Dumetella S.D.W." (Oberholser 1974); "Lucar Coues, 1875, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 27: 349. Type, by monotypy, Muscicapa carolinensis Linnaeus." (AOU Checklist, 7th ed., 1998, 515).

THRYOPHILUS
(Troglodytidae; † Rufous-and-white Wren T. rufalbus) Gr. θρυον thruon reed; φιλος philos lover; this name reflects the relationship with Thryothorus, rather than a preferred habitat; "Thryophilus: rufalbus, poliopleura, sinaloa, modestus, albipectus, galbraithi, striolatus, longirostris, castaneus, nigricapillus, schottii. ... THRYOPHILUS, BAIRD. Thryophilus, BAIRD. (Type Thryothorus rufalbus.) ... In the introductory remarks on the Troglodytidæ I have already alluded to a genus of American Wrens, the species of which have hitherto been included in the genus Thryothorus. They differ, however, in having a much more distinctly notched bill, and in the peculiarly open nostrils, which seem to lack the overhanging scale or membrane of Thryothorus and Pheugopedius, leaving the nasal aperture to occupy the anterior extremity of the nasal groove, with the internal lateral septum exposed, but vertical, and extending forward to the anterior extremity of the nostril, not ending abruptly behind. This is a peculiarity very easily appreciated in most cases. ... Finding, therefore, no name ready at hand for this group, I am compelled to make a new one." (Baird 1864); "Thryophilus Baird, 1864, Review Amer. Birds Mus. Smithson. Inst., I, p. 127. Type, by original designation, Thryothorus rufalbus Lafresnaye." (mihi 2020).

velia
Mod. L. (Holyoake 1639) velia unknown small bird < Gr. ελεα elea (also ελεια eleia) small marsh bird mentioned by Aristotle, perhaps some sort of warbler (Björn Bergenholtz in litt.); "99. MOTACILLA. ... Velia. 26. M. cærulea, ventre clunibusque rufescentibus. Muscicapa cærulea, ventre rubro. Edw. av. 22. t. 22. Habitat Surinami." (Linnaeus 1758) (Tangara).

Last edited by James Jobling : Tuesday 9th June 2020 at 21:28. Reason: itchei see #13
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Old Tuesday 9th June 2020, 20:19   #13
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James et al, Thought I would double-check the honouree of Gigantohierax itchei by writing to Mr Himel's family. I found that the correct Irving Himel is still living and active. He was most kind to give us a lovely account of his friendship with William Suarez (attached).

Can I suggest:

Itchei
Irving "Itche" Himel (1936-) Canadian businessman, philanthropist, and birder who aided William Suarez in his research whilst in Toronto (I. Himel in litt.) (‡Gigantohierax).
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Irving Himel.pdf (269.1 KB, 22 views)
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Old Wednesday 10th June 2020, 07:29   #14
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Paul, well done, and thanks for sharing the words by Himel himself!

[.. but surely you must suggest (a lower case) itchei, not "Itchei" ]

/B
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Old Wednesday 17th June 2020, 17:17   #15
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Bulletin 5: .... major amendments and supplemental material
gutierrezi
Maj. Dionisio Gutierrez (b. 1891) Philippine Army/Constabulary, Gov. of Cotabato (Martin Schneider in litt.) (syn. Streptopelia dusumieri).
itchei
Irving "Itche" Himel (b. 1936) Canadian businessman, philanthropist, birdwatcher who aided researcher William Suarez in Toronto (I. Himel per P. Scofield in litt.) (‡Gigantohierax).
luciae
• Lucy Ashton Boosey née Whitehead (1866-1941) sister of explorer John Whitehead and wife of music publisher Arthur Boosey (Mark Brown in litt.) (subsp. Otus spilocephalus).
Nystactes
(syn. Capito † Black-spotted Barbet C. niger) Gr. νυστακτης nustaktēs drowsy < νυσταζω nustazō to doze; "Capito, Vt. — Nystactes, m. Capito ein Großkopf; ein auch anderweitig häufiger vorkommendes Wort von einem sich wenig empfehlenden Sinne. — Nystactes (dormitor, nystagma Schlaffucht) in Bezug auf ihr schläfriges Wesen, weßhalb eine Art Bucco somnolentus. (Tamatia Cuv. ist eine vox barbara)." (Gloger 1827); "Nystactes Gloger, Froriep's Notizen, 16, 1827, col. 277. Type, by monotypy, Bucco somnolentus [Lichtenstein] = Bucco tamatia Gmelin." (Peters, 1948, VI, 11). Despite Cory, 1919, Cat. Bds. Americas, II (2), 395-396, Peters, 1948, l.c., Rasmussen & Collar in del Hoyo, Elliott & Sargatal (eds.), 2002, Handbook Bds. World, 7, 126-127, and, by inference, Dickinson & Remsen (eds.), 2013, H & M, I, 4th ed., 290, footnote 11, Laurent Raty in litt. correctly shows that Nystactes Gloger is merely a new name for Capito Vieillot (see Chaunornis and Tamatia). Var. Nyctactes, Nyctades, Nyctastes, Nystastes.
TAMATIA
(Bucconidae; † Spotted Puffbird T. tamatia) Tupí name Tîmatíâi crooked bill, for the Boat-billed Heron Cochlearius, mistakenly given by Marcgrave 1648, to an unidentified spotted, thrush-like bird. The name has been associated with the puffbirds and barbets, considered allies, ever since; Gloger, 1827, regarded Tamatia Cuvier as a barbarous name; "LES TAMATIAS. ... Leur tête grosse, leur queue courte, leur grand bec, leur donnent un air stupide. Tous ceux qu'on connait sont d'Amérique, et ne vivent que d'insectes. Leur naturel est triste et solitaire.(1). ... (1) Bucco macrorhynchos, enl. 689. — Melanoleucos, enl. 688, 2. — Collaris, enl. 395. — Tamatia, enl. 746, 2. (Nob. Tamatia maculata.) TAMATIA, nom de l'un de ces oiseaux au Brésil, selon Margrave. On les nomme chacurus au Paraguay, selon d'Azzara." (Cuvier 1817); Tamatia Cuvier, 1817, Règne Animal, I, 429, footnote (1). Type, by tautonymy, Tamatia maculata Cuvier, 1817 = Bucco Tamatia J. Gmelin, 1788." (mihi 2020) (see Nystactes).
Synon. Chaunornis.
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Old Tuesday 14th July 2020, 11:56   #16
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Bulletin 6: ... additions and supplemental material
burleyi
Prof. David V. Burley (fl. 2020) Canadian palaeontologist (‡ Tongoenas).
Drymoedus
(syn. Drymodes † Papuan Scrub-robin D. beccarii) Unattested Gr. δρυμωδος drumōdos woodland singer < δρυμος drumos wood; ωδος ōdos singer; "Drymoedus, lapsu: "Drymodes" Gould *) Z. Pr. 1840, 170 ... *) Drymodes, gr. Δρυμωδης, significat; silvosus, s. terra silvis plena. - Sensus vero nominis est δρυμωδος, silvæ cantor: Drymodus vel drymoedus scribendum. Analoga sunt: tragoedus, comoedia; - parodia, prosodia etc." (Sundevall 1872); "Sp. 52. Drymoedus beccarii, nov. sp. ... Questa specie somiglia per le dimensioni e pel colorito al D. superciliaris, Gould ... Non si conosce altra specie di Drymoedus della Nuova Guinea; nella parte meridionale d'Australia vive una terza specie, il D. brunneopygia, Gould." (Salvadori 1876); "Drymoedus Salvadori, Ann. Mus. Civ. Gen. 1875, vol. vii. p. 965, 1876. Type (by monotypy): D. beccarii Salv. (new spelling?)" (Mathews, 1930, Syst. Av. Austral., II, 560).
Dynamene
(syn. Eudynamys † Western Koel E. scolopaceus) Gr. δυναμις dunamis power, strength (cf. δυναμενη dunamenē hypotenuse (i.e. the powers of numbers)); probably an error for the misremembered Eudynamys; "C. Rostro basi depresso. ... Sp. 20. Cu. maculatus. Steph. v. ix. p. 102. —Cu. punctatus. Steph. v. ix. p. 105. —Cu. scolopaceus. Steph. v. ix. p. 95. ... Sp. 21. Cu. honoratus. Steph. v. ix. p. 104. pl. 21. ... Sp. 22. Cu. Taitensis. Steph. v. ix. p. 92. ... Sp. 23. Cu. orientalis. Steph. v. ix. p. 87. ... Sp. 24. Cu. lugubris. Linn. Trans. (Horsf.) v. xiii. p. 179. ... The species of this section appertain to the genus Dynamene? of Messrs. Vigors and Horsfield, of which Cu. maculatus is the type." (Stephens 1826); "Dynamene Stephens, in Shaw's Gen. Zool. vol. xiv. pt. I, p. 211, 1826 (end). Type (by original designation): Cuculus maculatus Stephens. Not Dynamene Leach, Edinb. Encycl. vol. vii. pt. 2, p. 433, 1814." (Mathews, 1927, Syst. Av. Austral., I, 417).
Entomothera
Gr. εντομα entoma insects < εντομη entomē notch; -θηρας -thēras hunter < θηραω thēraō to hunt < θηρ thēr, θηρος thēros beast, animal.
• (syn. Halcyon † Ruddy Kingfisher H. coromanda) "MARTIN-CHASSEUR Le Vaillant ... This section of the genus Alcedo (to the individuals of which the denomination of Entomotheræ "Chasseurs" may be applied) hold a situation intermediate between Alcedo and Dacelo. ... Spec. 3. Alcedo tridactyla Linn. ... Chuchack-urang Javanis. Spec. 4. Alcedo leucocephala Gmel. TENGKE-buto Javanis. ... Spec. 5. Alcedo coromanda Lath. TENGKE-sumbo Javanis. ... Spec. 6. Alcedo chlorocephala Gmel. TENGKE-cheger Javanis. ... Spec. 7. Alcedo sacra Gmel. TENGKE Javanis. ... Spec. 8. Alcedo melanoptera mihi. ... TENGKE-urang Javanis." (Horsfield 1822 (Trans. Linn. Soc.)); "and the characteristic name of M. Le Vaillant, which has been applied to the second section of the genus Alcedo, in the Catalogue above mentioned, (p. 173,) has there suggested the name of ENTOMOTHERA" (Horsfield 1824 (Zool. Researches Java)); "Entomothera Horsfield, 1822, Trans. Linnean Soc. London, XIII, 173. Type, by subsequent designation (Sharpe, 1871, Monograph Alcedinidæ or Family of Kingfishers, xiii), Alcedo coromanda Latham." (mihi 2020). Var. Enthomothera, Enotomothera.
• (syn. Halcyon † Smyrna Kingfisher H. smyrnensis) "*VI. Entomothera HORSFIELD. — Nat. Syst. d. Vögel, Sppl. ... *32. E. fusca (Alc. — BODDAERT) R. ... 33. E. smyrnensis (Alc. — GM) R. ... *34. E. gularis (Alc. — KUHL.) R. ... *35. E. melanoptera (Alc. — HORSF.) R. ... *36. E. pileata (Alc. — BODD) R." (Reichenbach 1851); "Entomothera Reichenbach, 1851, Das natürliche System der Vögel. Alcedineae. Eisvögel, 12. Type, by subsequent designation (G. Gray, 1855, Cat. Genera Subgenera Birds Brit. Mus., 16), Alcedo fusca Boddaert = Alcedo smyrnensis Linnaeus." (mihi 2020).
epia/ epius
Gr. ηπιος epios mild, gentle (Normand David in litt.) (Ramphiculus).
Hina
(syn. Biziura † Musk Duck B. lobata) Apparently based on a Chinese name for a duck (see hina); "BIZIURA, Leach. Steph. (1824). Anas, Shaw. Hydrobates, Temm. (182?). Hina, Leach, MSS. B. lobata, (Shaw) Eyton. Nat. Misc., pl. 255. B. novæ hollandiæ, Steph." (G. Gray 1841); "Hina Gray, List Genera Birds, 2nd ed. p. 96, Sept. 1841, ex Leach MS. In synonymy of Biziura." (Mathews, 1927, Syst. Av. Austral., I, 222).
Lestris
Gr. λη̣στρις lēistris female pirate < λῃστηρ lēistēr, λῃστηρος lēistēros pirate < ληις lēis booty, plunder.
• (syn. Catharacta † Great Skua C. skua) "STERCORAIRE. — LESTRIS. (ILLIG.) ... Les Mauves sont des oiseaux lâches et craintifs; les Stercoraires, au contraire, sont courageux et intrépides, éternels ennemis des premiers, ils les harcèlent continuellement. ... ils se nourrissent le plus habituellement des alimens qu'ils obligent les mauves de dégorger ... STERCORAIRE CATARACTE. LESTRIS CATARRACTES ... STERCORAIRE POMARIN. LESTRIS POMARINUS ... STERCORAIRE PARASITE OU LABBE. LESTRIS PARASITICUS (Temminck 1820); "Lestris, "Illiger," Temminck, Man. Orn. 1820—40. Typus L. catarractes. (Sed non verus Lestris Ill. cujus typus L. parasiticus L. est.)" (Coues 1863) (see below).
• (syn. Stercorarius † Long-tailed Skua S. longicaudus) "Genera et Species typicae. ... 2. *Lestris ILLIG. longicaudata (Stercorarius — us Briss.) Ill. Tab. V. Caput, culmen, ala, cauda." (Reichenbach 1853). Reichenbach's 1850, plate V, labelled Lestrinae-Larinae, clearly shows the long tail-feathers and black head of the rare dark-phase Long-tailed Skua. From its date this typification would take precedence over that of Coues 1863 (see below); however, Stercorarius longicaudus was not an originally-included species.
• (syn. Stercorarius † Arctic Skua S. parasiticus) "GENUS 129. LESTRIS (ληστρις praedatrix) Catharacta Brünnich. Stercorarius Brisson (Raub-mewe Germ. Stercoraire Gall. Skua-Gull Angl.) ... Species: Larus parasiticus, crepidatus, Catharractes Lin." (Illiger 1811); "Lestris Illiger, Prodr. Mamm. & Av. p. 272 (pref. April), 1811. Type (by subsequent designation, Coues, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philad. 1863, pp. 124, 128): L. parasiticus Linné." (Mathews, 1927, Syst. Av. Austral., I, 151).
lobkovi
Evgeni Georgievich Lobkov (fl. 2008) Russian ornithologist, ecologist (syn. Corvus corone orientalis).
Pernopsis
(syn. Butastur † Grasshopper Buzzard B. rufipennis) Genus Pernis Cuvier, 1816, honey buzzard; Gr. οψις opsis appearance (cf. specific name Poliornis pernopsis Dubus de Ghisignies, 1850 (= syn. Butastur rufipennis)); "Poliornis possède quatre espèces, dont une fort remarquable, P. pernopsis, Schlegel (Pernopsis pyrrhoptera, Dubus), de petite taille, et ressemblant à la Bondrée [Pernis]." (Bonaparte 1850); "Pernopsis Bonaparte, 1850, Revue Mag. Zool.: 481—type (by monotypy) Poliornis pernopsis Du Bus = Poliornis rufipennis Sundevall." (RAOU Checklist Birds Australia, 1975, I, 83).
Plissolophus
(syn. Cacatua † Salmon-crested Cockatoo C. moluccensis) Gr. πλισσομαι plissomai to cross (the legs); λοφος lophos crest; "b) Gehäubte Papageien, (Kakatu's mit kantiger Schnabelfirste . . 193 Eigentliche K. Plissolophus. Bart-K. Calyptorhynchus. Rüssel-K. Microglossus. ... Die eigentlichen Kakatu's, (Plissolophus,) mit kurzen, geraden Schwänzen, sind herrlich weiß ... Die Spitzen der letzteren hängen bei mehreren Arten, den größten, nach hinten; bei zweien kräuseln sich die ausnehmend langen, hochgelben Spitzen etwas nach oben und vorn." (Gloger 1842) (see Camptolophus).
Tongoenas
‡ (Columbidae; † Burley's Fruit Pigeon T. burleyi) Tonga Is., south-west Pacific Ocean; Gr. οινας oinas pigeon.
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Old Tuesday 14th July 2020, 14:36   #17
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First one David Vincent Burley https://loop.frontiersin.org/people/426079/overview or https://books.google.com/books?id=fV...6AEwAXoECAAQAg
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Old Tuesday 14th July 2020, 15:05   #18
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James, I might be able to add some minor details on ...

burleyi as in:
• the Holocene, extinct, subfossil species Burley's Fruit Pigeon Tongoenas burleyi STEADMAN & TAKANO 2020

= Candadian archaeologist (and palaeontologist) Professor, Dr. (PhD) David 'Dave' Burley, of Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada, whose full name is David Vincent Burley, BA, MA (University of New Brunswick), PhD (in 1979, Simon Fraser University, Thesis; here or/alt. here), etc., etc., ...

[i.e. this guy, also see here (p.3), or he himself, live on Youtube, here].

/B

PS. Ouups! While I was typing away, finding/copying links, compiling it, and so on ... Martin was quicker than me!
--

Last edited by Calalp : Tuesday 14th July 2020 at 22:20. Reason: PS. + typo
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Old Wednesday 15th July 2020, 20:44   #19
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Bulletin 7: ... more recent additions and supplemental material
Charmosynoides
(syn. Charmosyna † Duchess Lorikeet C. margarethae) Genus Charmosyna Wagler, 1832, lorikeet; Gr. -οιδης -oidēs resembling; "Charmosynoides Joseph, Merwin and Smith gen. nov. ... Type-species Charmosyna margarethae Tristram, 1879. Ibis 21: 437-444. Etymology Charmosynoides, meaning like or resembling Charmosyna, has been chosen to reflect the similarity of the species to the predominantly red and green species of Charmosyna. Its gender is feminine." (Joseph et al. 2020) (Jim Gaudin in litt.); "Charmosynoides Joseph, Merwin & Smith, 2020, Emu-Austral Ornithology, p. 11: https://doi.org/10.1080/01584197.2020.1779596. Type, by original designation and monotypy, Charmosyna margarethae Tristram." (mihi 2020).
Malacurus
(syn. Malurus † Superb Fairy-wren M. cyaneus) Gr. μαλακος malakos soft; ουρα oura tail; probably a lapsus for misremembered Malurus; "Unserer Schwanz- und Bartmeise der Gestalt nach fast in gleichem Grade ähnlich, wiewohl anders gefärbt, ist ein Vögelchen aus Neuholland, der Flor-schweif, (Malacurus,) dessen Schwanzfedernfahnen so feltsam dünn stehende Fasern zeigen, daß sie völlig durchsichtig erscheinen und sich zu denen anderer Vögel in dieser Beziehung etwa so verhalten, wie bloßer Flor oder dünnes Schleiergewebe zu Leinward." (Gloger 1842).
Saudareos
(syn. Trichoglossus † Ornate Lorikeet T. ornatus) Bahasa Indonesia saudara sister; genus Eos Wagler, 1832, lory; "Saudareos Joseph, Merwin and Smith gen. nov. ... Type-species Psittacus ornatus Linnaeus, 1758, Syst. Nat., tenth edition, 1: 98. Etymology Derived from saudara the Bahasa for 'sister' in combination with the name of its sister genus Eos. Its gender is feminine and so comprises four new combinations S. ornata, S. iris, S. flavoviridis and S. johnstoniae." (Joseph et al. 2020) (Jim Gaudin in litt.); "Saudareos Joseph, Merwin & Smith, 2020, Emu-Austral Ornithology, p. 7: https://doi.org/10.1080/01584197.2020.1779596. Type, by original designation, Psittacus ornatus Linnaeus." (mihi 2020).
Synorhacma
(syn. Charmosyna † Striated Lorikeet C. multistriata) "Synorhacma Joseph, Merwin and Smith gen. nov. ... Type-species Charmosynopsis multistriata Rothschild, 1911. Bull. Brit. Orn. Club 27: 45. Etymology Synorhacma is an anagram of Charmosyna the genus in which this species has mostly been placed since it was described. Its gender is feminine. It is chosen to symbolise the reshuffling of plumage traits through the natural and sexual selection that appears to have confounded the genus-level systematics of the Lorinii and resulted in genera that frequently have little phenotypic cohesion." (Joseph et al. 2020) (Jim Gaudin in litt.); "Synorhacma Joseph, Merwin & Smith, 2020, Emu-Austral Ornithology, p. 10: https://doi.org/10.1080/01584197.2020.1779596. Type, by original designation and monotypy, Charmosynopsis multistriata Rothschild." (mihi 2020).

Last edited by James Jobling : Thursday 16th July 2020 at 08:03. Reason: clarifications
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Old Saturday 18th July 2020, 09:29   #20
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Gutierrez's (Philippine) Collared-Dove

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
Bulletin 5: .... major amendments and supplemental material
gutierrezi
Maj. Dionisio Gutierrez (b. 1891) Philippine Army/Constabulary, Gov. of Cotabato (Martin Schneider in litt.) (syn. Streptopelia dusumieri).
....
Nothing major (but maybe worth another look/go) regarding ...

• the invalid (Philippine) Collared-Dove ssp. "Streptopelia dussumieri gutierrezi"* HACHISUKA 1930:
Quote:
Named after the Governor of Cotabato, Captain Dionisio Gutierrez of the Philippine Constabulary.
To me it seems like Captain, later Major, Dionisio Gutierrez climbed the ranks, even higher ...
Quote:
Cotabato then was one of the special provinces under the Administrative Code of Mindanao and Sulu. Municipal District Mayors were appointed through the recommendation of the military governor of Cotabato, Col. Dionisio Gutierrez.

[from here]
There's even a "Governor Dionisio Gutierrez Avenue" in today's Cotabato City, on Mindanao, named after the same Military Provincial Governor, Colonel Dionisio Gutierrez! He's also mentioned here: as "(Lieutenant) Colonel Dionisio Gutierrez."

In the Official roster of officers and employees in the civil service of the Philippine Islands (here, from 1920) he's listed (on p.21), in/below the "Philippine Constabulary" as:
Quote:
[Captain] Dionisio Gutierrez ........................7–22–13 ... 3000 [Month–Day–Year, Date of his Original appointment] (+3000 pesos in Salary)
If born in "1891" he would have been about 22 when he joined the Philippine Constabulary in 1913 (which seems plausible), ... however, after having been Governor of the Province Cotabato (a k a Kutang Bato), between 1922 and (at least) 1936/7, it looks like Gutierrez could, might have gone into Politics (in the late 1930's/early 1940s). But if he truly did, I cannot tell.

Also see; here, or here (p.52). And here. However, no Death year found. But he seems to have passed in, or pre-, 1959. See; here, here or here.

Surely, with such a high ranked person/Officer/Governor, it ought to be possible to find his full years? That is, if one understands the language (of course) ...

Good luck finding the last pieces!

Björn

PS. Either way, he's not to be confused with his fellow countryman "Perpetuo Dionisio Gutierrez, Clinical Medicine (1912-15)" mentioned/listed here, nor with his many contemporary namesakes in South America, like (for example) his Guatemalan ditto; Dionisio Gutiérrez, (born 1959), who made quite an international career/success with his Pollo Campero (a Fried Chicken Franschise, that started in 1971), or his many US, or Cuban, namesakes, still alive.

____________________________________
*today a synonym of the debated subspecies (or species?)
Streptopelia bitorquata dusumier (Temminck, 1823),
IOC/Howard & Moore versus Clements, HBW/BirdLife/eBird, etc.

--

Last edited by Calalp : Sunday 19th July 2020 at 09:11. Reason: rephrased PS.
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Old Saturday 18th July 2020, 14:04   #21
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[quote=James Jobling;4033018]Bulletin 7: ... more recent additions and supplemental material

Malacurus
(syn. Malurus † Superb Fairy-wren M. cyaneus) Gr. μαλακος malakos soft; ουρα oura tail; probably a lapsus for misremembered Malurus; "Unserer Schwanz- und Bartmeise der Gestalt nach fast in gleichem Grade ähnlich, wiewohl anders gefärbt, ist ein Vögelchen aus Neuholland, der Flor-schweif, (Malacurus,) dessen Schwanzfedernfahnen so feltsam dünn stehende Fasern zeigen, daß sie völlig durchsichtig erscheinen und sich zu denen anderer Vögel in dieser Beziehung etwa so verhalten, wie bloßer Flor oder dünnes Schleiergewebe zu Leinward." (Gloger 1842).

Aber bitte, James!
I take the liberty to indicate a few minor errors in your quote (they could have featured in Gloger's OD, but I doubt that).
1. Schwanzfedernfahnen > Schwanzfederfahnen, compound words without the plural -n- of the first element
2. feltsam > seltsam, in the source this "f" is doubtless a Gothic s, not an f; seltsam = remarkably
3. I do not know about Martin Schneider's clothing habits, of course, but I am sure he does not wear Leinward shirts . . . The word is: Leinwand = linen

die Leinwand = the linen; das Lein or Flachs = flax (plant, genus Linum)
Quite an interesting word: in Dutch the equivalent lijnwaad is obsolete, but we still have lijnzaad = linen seed, which is ubiquitous in food nowadays, in bird food as well, although the textile is called "linnen". Also lijnolie (oil) and historical names: Rotterdam has a famous street "Lijnbaan" (originally: linen lane, because the plant stuff was stretched there to produce rope material). The Rotterdam people have their own funny name for this business street: the "Koopgoot" = purchase gutter! It is a line of shops, indeed, and it sounds well . . . (pron. oo like in: to owe) Many people do not realise much of this, I suppose, because the normal word lijn = line, like in writing and drawing and hanging laundry (waslijn, etymology: was = 1. wax, 2. laundry. 3. verb: like in English: I/he/she was). Oh, I forgot the birds: linnet = Linaria, we have an old name Vlasvink (flax finch), nowadays: Kneu. Wow, such a wealth in our languages!
Enjoy, and I apologize for this linguistic drive (professional deviation), it will never fade, I suppose. Hope you are well and hold on (here it seems like the Swifts are leaving us already, I saw a cloud of them high passing over earlier this week) . . .
Jan van der Brugge
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Old Saturday 18th July 2020, 14:34   #22
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Much appreciated, Jan. Despite all my cribs I still have problems with Fraktur, hence feltsam instead of seltsam. The other two are pure misreadings/typos. Key MS corrected.
Currently working out which is the best sort of mask to wear. I fancy the one worn by Herbert Lom as Ben Yusuf in El Cid!
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Old Saturday 18th July 2020, 19:33   #23
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Quote:
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Much appreciated, Jan. Despite all my cribs
Currently working out which is the best sort of mask to wear. I fancy the one worn by Herbert Lom as Ben Yusuf in El Cid!
James, do you like opera music? Well, it does not matter really. Verdi's opera Don Carlo is on youtube, open air performance in France, with Montserrat Caballé. In the opera there is also a wonderful piece "The Dance of the Veil", of which mezzosoprano Grace Bumbry with the other ladies-in-waiting present a marvellous colourful show, which you can only enjoy, opera-lover or not.
Of course I cannot tell at which moment of the opera this takes place, but you could find out easily in the description of the work. The veil is beautiful, but not really the right choice for covering your face, in hot Spain, I think.
Well, stay well, all the best,
Jan van der Brugge (I can unveil that I still see some Swifts these days, 2 or 3, suppose they still have young to feed)
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Old Saturday 18th July 2020, 22:28   #24
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Hi James, I have been too much focused on the errors in the quoted German text. Obviously Gloger did not mean Malurus superbus or another actual Malurus species, with his term Florschleif (= gaze-tail).
Here is what I had in my own file for the Emu Wren, whose tail is far more fitting for Gloger's name, and see all the synonyms.
I should have been more alert and I feel obliged to keep others alert as well, for the benefit of science and BF!
Cheers, Jan van der Brugge

Stipiturus malachurus (Muscicapa malachura Shaw, Muscicapa malachura Davies, Muscicapa malachura Latham, Malurus malachura Temminck, Malurus malachurus, S.malacurus, Motacilla fimbriata Wilkes, Malurus palustris Vieillot, Malurus gularis Stephens, Malurus gularis Griffin, Malurus emitis Ewing)
(Southern Emu Wren, Southern Emu-Wren, Southern Emuwren)
(Roodoor-emoesluiper, Emoesluiper / Rotstirn-Borstenschwanz, Wimpern-Borstenschwanz,
Borstenschwanz / Stipiture à queue gazée)
[Blue-throated Warbler (Add.Brit.Mus. 1831-1833, for Malurus gularis). Soft-tailed Fly-catcher.
Muscicapa malachura, Linn. Malurus malachura, Cuv. (The Book of Nature, 1834).
Emu-Wren (Birds of Western Australia, p.82). Emeu Merion, Emeu Bird (Mus.Brookes, pp.84 & 95, for
Malurus malachurus).]
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Old Sunday 19th July 2020, 08:40   #25
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Jan,
Thanks for your insight. I have amended the initial text of Malacurus in the Key MS as follows: "Gr. μαλακος malakos soft; ουρα oura tail; perhaps a lapsus for misremembered Malurus, but if Malacurus is a new name, Jan van der Brugge in litt. suggests that Gloger's text better fits the "gauze-tailed" tautonymous Stipiturus malachurus;"
All harmony. James

Last edited by James Jobling : Sunday 19th July 2020 at 21:15.
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Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

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