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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

G9 + 100-400 settings (1 Viewer)

stuarta21

Well-known member
Keen to learn settings from anyone who is getting consistently good results from this combo please. Currently have mine on aperture priority, iso800 (as a start point, depending on conditions).
 

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I am using the little brother, G85. I do not know if my experience will help you. I use shutter priority , 1/400 for stationary birds, 1/800 for birds in flight, and try to go even faster if light is good. I use auto iso with max at 3200, and I would likely allow 6400 on the G9 (depending on your tolerance for noise and quality of your post processing.
Niels
 
I also use the G85, but if I had a G9 I would set things up differently. I would use aperture priority, as the G9 allows you to set a minimum shutter speed when using auto ISO. I would therefore create two custom modes, one for perched birds and one for birds in flight:

C1: Minimum shutter speed 400 / max ISO 1600.
C2: Minimum shutter speed 2000 / max ISO 3200.

If light is poor and the camera can't achieve the minimum shutter speed even at your max ISO, it will reduce the shutter speed automatically to get the correct exposure.

I personally don't like to go above ISO 3200 on M43; in fact, I prefer to keep it under 1600. But as Niels says, it depends on your tolerance of noise (and how much you'll be cropping). I find that processing raw files in DXO Photolab can produce surprsingly good results at higher ISOs.
 

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