• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Ieraglaucinae (1 Viewer)

Gonçalo Elias

Well-known member
Portugal
Hi all,

According to the Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World, the Owl family Strigidae comprises several subfamilies.

One of these subfamilies is called Ieraglaucinae.

I checked James Jobling's Dictionary, and Ieraglaux is listed as a synonym for Ninox, so I guess the subfamily name comes from here. However, according to the checklist there are currently no species belonging to the genus Ieraglaux (all members of the subfamily are placed in the genus Ninox or Uroglaux). Shouldn't there be at least one species matching the subfamily name?
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Hi all,

According to the Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World, the Owl family Strigidae comprises several subfamilies.

One of these subfamilies is called Ieraglaucinae.

I checked James Jobling's Dictionary, and Ieraglaux is listed as a synonym for Ninox, so I guess the subfamily name comes from here. However, according to the checklist there are currently no species belonging to the genus Ieraglaux (all members of the subfamily are placed in the genus Ninox or Uroglaux). Shouldn't there be at least one species matching the subfamily name?

The same happened with the fossil Strigiformes family Protostrigidae Wetmore, 1933 with type genus Protostrix Wetmore, 1933, but Cécile Mourer-Chauviré, 1983 placed Protostrix Wetmore, 1933 in synonymy with Minerva Shufeldt, 1915 and the family name didnot change, it is still Protostrigidae Wetmore, 1933.

Fred
 

l_raty

laurent raty
One of these subfamilies is called Ieraglaucinae.

I checked James Jobling's Dictionary, and Ieraglaux is listed as a synonym for Ninox, so I guess the subfamily name comes from here. However, according to the checklist there are currently no species belonging to the genus Ieraglaux (all members of the subfamily are placed in the genus Ninox or Uroglaux). Shouldn't there be at least one species matching the subfamily name?
It used to be the case, but not any more. (And it was not really 'formal', as the creation of formal rules governing family-group names is a quite recent evolution.) The general rule now is that the oldest family-group name formed from a genus-group name included in the family must be used.
(With a significant number of exceptions, though.
If the name of the type genus was suppressed partially or completely by the Commission, the family-group name cannot be used.
If the name of the type genus is a junior homonym, the family-group name cannot be used.
If a family-group name which is not the oldest is in prevailing use for a taxon that includes a subtaxon for which the oldest name is in prevailing use (e.g., Phasianidae Horsfield 1821, in prevailing use for a family that includes a subfamily Tetraoninae Leach 1819), the younger name must be maintained for the broader taxon.
If the oldest family-group name was replaced before 1961 by a younger name as a result of the type genus of the oldest name having been synonymized with the type genus of the new name (= the old rule), and if this younger name is in prevailing use, this younger name must be maintained (and is deemed to take precedence from the date of publication of the older name).
If a family-group name which is not the oldest is in wide use, and the oldest name has not been used at all after 1899, the name is wide use must be maintained.)
(Beware, however, that a new family-group name cannot be proposed in a work where the genus-group name it is formed from is not treated as the valid name of a full genus.)

"Ieraglaucinae" is formed from "Ieraglaux", which is a subsequent spelling of Hieracoglaux Kaup 1848 (Kaup JJ. 1848. Uebersicht der Eulen (Strigidae). Isis (Oken), Jahrgang 1848: 753-774.; p. 768; https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/13256491 ; originally included nominal species: Ninox connivens, N. strenuus; type: Falco connivens Latham 1801 by subsequent designation in: Gray GR. 1855. Catalogue of the genera and subgenera of birds contained in the British Museum. British Museum, London.; p. 8; https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/17136628 ; OD of type: Latham J. 1801. Supplementum indicis ornithologici, sive systematis ornithologiae. G Leigh, J & S Sotheby, London.; p. xii; https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/33261386 ). The variant spelling was introduced by Kaup himself in 1849, in: https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/13705874 ; the change may have been intentional, but Kaup did not make this clear, hence under the current Code it must be treated as an error.

This family-group name is attributable to Bonaparte 1854 (who spelled it "Ieroglauceae": Bonaparte CL. 1854. Conspectus systematis ornithologiae. Ann. Sci. Nat. (Zool.), sér.4, 1: 105-152.; p. 112; https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/35982397 ).

Family-group names formed from a subsequent spelling must be corrected to match the stem of the original spelling of the name of their type genus (unless the change of spelling was mandatory under the Code, or is conserved for some other reason): "Ieraglaucinae" as such is unacceptable, as is Bonaparte's "Ieroglauceae" (from "Ieroglaux", another subsequent spelling of Hieracoglaux); if used for a subfamily, the name must be corrected to Hieracoglaucinae.
 
Last edited:

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
If the oldest family-group name was replaced before 1961 by a younger name as a result of the type genus of the oldest name having been synonymized with the type genus of the new name (= the old rule), and if this younger name is in prevailing use, this younger name must be maintained (and is deemed to take precedence from the date of publication of the older name).

If a family-group name which is not the oldest is in wide use, and the oldest name has not been used at all after 1899, the name is wide use must be maintained.)
Do you have examples because I get lost ? 😅
 

andrew147

Well-known member
Hi all,

According to the Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World, the Owl family Strigidae comprises several subfamilies.

One of these subfamilies is called Ieraglaucinae.

I checked James Jobling's Dictionary, and Ieraglaux is listed as a synonym for Ninox, so I guess the subfamily name comes from here. However, according to the checklist there are currently no species belonging to the genus Ieraglaux (all members of the subfamily are placed in the genus Ninox or Uroglaux). Shouldn't there be at least one species matching the subfamily name?
As it stands, Ninox in HBW and other checklists is poly- and paraphyletic. Sceloglaux and probably Uroglaux are embedded within it, and some 'Ninox' species belong in or near to Athene... seems likely that, in time and after more work, Hieracoglaux (type = connivens) will be needed once more for a group including connivens/novaeseelandiae and relatives - but not scutulata and relatives (true Ninox).

See (e.g.):
Salter et al (2019) 'Extensive paraphyly in the typical owl family (Strigidae)'
Wood et al (2016) 'Phylogenetic relationships and terrestrial adaptations of the extinct laughing owl, Sceloglaux albifacies (Aves: Strigidae)'
Gwee et al (2016) 'Bioacoustic and multi-locus DNA data of Ninox owls support high incidence of extinction and recolonisation on small, low-lying islands across Wallacea'

The name Spiloglaux (type = boobook) may further complicate things, however, as it may have same author date as Hieracoglaux. Some resources date Spiloglaux as 1851 though, I'm not sure what is correct.
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Do you have examples because I get lost ? 😅
1 - Parulidae Wetmore, Friedmann, Lincoln, Miller, Peters, Van Rossem, Van Tyne & Zimmer 1947 (type Parula Bonaparte 1838, type Parus americanus Linnaeus 1758) is deemed to have replaced Sylvicolinae Swainson 1837 (type Sylvicola Swainson 1827, type Sylvia pusilla Wilson 1811, the latter a junior synonym of Parus americanus Linnaeus), as a result of Sylvicola Swainson (which is preoccupied by Sylvicola Hübner 1810, Mollusca) having been made a synonym of Parula Bonaparte, and is in prevailing use. Parulidae is not to be replaced with Sylvicolinae, despite this name being older; instead, it is given the precedence of the latter, i.e., takes precedence over any name published after 1837. Such as, e.g., Setophaginae Chenu & Des Murs 1853.

2 - This is a general rule that applies to all name, not just family-group names. Platyrhamphides Billberg 1828 (type Platyrhamphus Billberg 1828, type Numenius pusillus Bechstein 1809 - a synonym of Limicola falcinellus Pontoppidan, now in Calidris) has not been used after 1899 and should not displace Calidridinae.
 

l_raty

laurent raty
The name Spiloglaux (type = boobook) may further complicate things, however, as it may have same author date as Hieracoglaux. Some resources date Spiloglaux as 1851 though, I'm not sure what is correct.
Sceloglaux, Hieracoglaux, and Spiloglaux were introduced on the same page of the same 1848 Kaup work, all as subgenera of Ninox Hodgson.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top