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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Nikon P900, Nikon P950 or Nikon P1000 (1 Viewer)

Also it looks like the p950 has a smaller manual focus wheel, which might be better than the p1000 in that you won't accidentally knock it. (I use the wheel for changing exposure if I'm in auto focus)

The p950 focus looks more like a binocular focus wheel, although I'm only going by the pics.
 

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I did end up buying the Nikon P950. Not used it much yet.

Need to learn the best settings.

Thanks for all the help and advice.

Stonechat courtesy of the Nikon P950.

In terms of settings you mention, there is nothing extraordinary about the settings used here. Most criteria is on neutral. Aperture mode.

What's happened there, is that I've stepped to the side a bit and let the sun shine on him.

To each their own, but I'm convinced the settings are nowhere near as important as getting yourself into the right positions. In fact, while I was waiting for this camera I did my research, reading various articles, and had my settings ready so that when delivered I could quickly apply them and take the camera straight out. I did experiment a bit but pretty much ended up back where I started. I reckon that unless you're using some outrageous settings, it isn't going to make a great deal of difference.

Maybe post three settings that you're particularly not sure about and I'm sure people will give you some advice and the reasons for that advice.
 

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What I have found with these cameras, is that it is quite easy to end up in a shooting mode giving you really slow shutter speeds, 1/15 second , 1/30 second.
Shutter priority at least forces the ISO setting and aperture to give you the best chance of a higher speed.

I go the other way, Peter, and always use aperture mode.

I don't think these cameras can handle ISO at much higher than 400. In fact, that's the highest I go with my camera: 400 when it's cloudy but a bit of sun is getting through; 200 on a bright day. I don't notice much difference between 200 and 400, but a significant difference between 400 and 800.

The other thing I'd say is that I don't think shutter speed is as important as you do. I reckon it's more important to keep the ISO down.

The problem with these cameras is the small sensor. I've attached a picture of a Purple Sandpiper to illustrate. I've stepped to the side again to let the sun shine on the bird. That's a nice picture of the bird but the background is knackered. Ideally you would want a large depth of field for this picture so that there is detail in the other birds, but due to the small sensor on the camera you can't really have a small aperture setting as you're not going to get the same level of detail in the subject bird.

That's a big limitation and maybe more experienced camera users have found a way 'round that with a small sensor camera but I haven't.

I suppose that's why these cameras are 800 quid and why most people will buy more expensive equipment.
 

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I go the other way, Peter, and always use aperture mode.

I don't think these cameras can handle ISO at much higher than 400. In fact, that's the highest I go with my camera: 400 when it's cloudy but a bit of sun is getting through; 200 on a bright day. I don't notice much difference between 200 and 400, but a significant difference between 400 and 800.

The other thing I'd say is that I don't think shutter speed is as important as you do. I reckon it's more important to keep the ISO down.

The problem with these cameras is the small sensor. I've attached a picture of a Purple Sandpiper to illustrate. I've stepped to the side again to let the sun shine on the bird. That's a nice picture of the bird but the background is knackered. Ideally you would want a large depth of field for this picture so that there is detail in the other birds, but due to the small sensor on the camera you can't really have a small aperture setting as you're not going to get the same level of detail in the subject bird.

That's a big limitation and maybe more experienced camera users have found a way 'round that with a small sensor camera but I haven't.

I suppose that's why these cameras are 800 quid and why most people will buy more expensive equipment.
Hi.
The ISO can be higher.
 

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The colours of the P900 turned bad above ISO400, but they look better with the P950.
I take multiple photos at slow shutter speeds which together with the image stabilisation leads to acceptable results.
Still not a camera too use in gloomy conditions. I also had some odd results at high magnifications, with sharpness very uneven over the photo. Maybe just caused by atmospheric issues.
 
I'm new to the camera world, so I'm still learning a lot on my Nikon P950.
I mostly use the "bird mode" for quick and easy JPEG FINE shots, but for RAW images, I'm using the "P" mode, and my ISO settings right now is "auto 100-800".

At first I read a lot that you should always keep the ISO as low as possible, so I used to set it to AUTO 100-400,, but from my usage so far, I found that you don't need to stay that low. I found that leaving it AUTO 100-800 is a good value.

Another settings that I tweaked on my "P" mode was setting NR to LOW. Seems to give me a bit sharper images than the default, but I need more testing on that one. Active D light I leave it at Normal. Metering on matrix. AF area to spot, AF mode to full time, and continuous low.

This has given me good birding results so far, but there's so much more I need to mess around and learn. This is my first camera and I just got it.
 
The colours of the P900 turned bad above ISO400, but they look better with the P950.

I reckon there is more to the colours and overall look of the picture than the camera and its settings.

It's useful to illustrate with pictures that which is being claimed.

So, here are three Wheatear and a Siskin courtesy of the P950.

The first picture was taken early on the morning. It wasn't overly bright sunshine and so I was able to step to the side and let the sun shine on the bird.

The second picture was taken late in the evening, and so the same method employed as mentioned for the first picture.

The third picture was taken midday. It's bright sunshine and so I have no option other than to have the sun over my shoulder, otherwise it would have been over-exposed.

The fourth picture, the Siskin, was taken late in the day and so again I was able to step to the side and let the sun shine on the bird.

The third picture was taken at a much higher shutter speed (because it's midday and very bright) than the others, but it's easily the worst outcome in terms of the colours and the overall glow to the picture.

I reckon an important point is that the answer for your pictures doesn't necessarily lie in the camera and its settings.
 

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Hello! I'm also looking to buy a Nikon p950. I have found a secondhand one for €550, it's 4 years old and barely used. I'll go there and take a look at it as well. Is that a good deal for the camera? It would be my first ever camera so I'm very new to everything camera-related :)
 
Hello! I'm also looking to buy a Nikon p950. I have found a secondhand one for €550, it's 4 years old and barely used. I'll go there and take a look at it as well. Is that a good deal for the camera? It would be my first ever camera so I'm very new to everything camera-related :)

I'd say it's a very good deal, with the caveat that it depends on where you're buying it from. Obviously you want a warranty with it. In my experience, when reputable camera shops advertise a product as in good condition, they mean what they say. I've no idea on whether that's the same with eBay and the like.

'Sounds a low price to me, a few weeks back I saw a second hand Nikon P900 advertised for about 450 quid. Older technology and I'm presuming the camera had plenty of use. Then again, when you say "go there and take a look", it sounds like it's a camera shop.

As for 'new to everything camera-related', the menu is easy to follow. It may be an idea to have a look 'round the internet, read about P950 settings and decide what you're going to start with before the camera even turns up. Boatloads of people who have the camera have posted on all sorts of sites with their idea of the best settings for the camera.
 
I'd say it's a very good deal, with the caveat that it depends on where you're buying it from. Obviously you want a warranty with it. In my experience, when reputable camera shops advertise a product as in good condition, they mean what they say. I've no idea on whether that's the same with eBay and the like.

'Sounds a low price to me, a few weeks back I saw a second hand Nikon P900 advertised for about 450 quid. Older technology and I'm presuming the camera had plenty of use. Then again, when you say "go there and take a look", it sounds like it's a camera shop.

As for 'new to everything camera-related', the menu is easy to follow. It may be an idea to have a look 'round the internet, read about P950 settings and decide what you're going to start with before the camera even turns up. Boatloads of people who have the camera have posted on all sorts of sites with their idea of the best settings for the camera.
Thank you so much for the quick response!
Oops my bad, it's not a camera shop. It's just someone selling it on an Etsy-like shop. It's barely used but doesn't come with a warranty so that's also why I was a bit hesitant. I've read a lot about the p950 and if I'm right it should be quite beginner friendly which also really appeals to me! I think I'm just going to get it, very excited :)
 
Thank you so much for the quick response!
Oops my bad, it's not a camera shop. It's just someone selling it on an Etsy-like shop. It's barely used but doesn't come with a warranty so that's also why I was a bit hesitant. I've read a lot about the p950 and if I'm right it should be quite beginner friendly which also really appeals to me! I think I'm just going to get it, very excited :)

Worth looking around in the UK they seem to have dropped in price - e.g.: Nikon Coolpix P950 Digital Camera

The series has compromises - small sensor that needs decent light to get the best out of it, but correspondingly small form for such a long zoom range. To get much better you'll pay a lot more and have a much bulkier set up.
 
Worth looking around in the UK they seem to have dropped in price - e.g.: Nikon Coolpix P950 Digital Camera

The series has compromises - small sensor that needs decent light to get the best out of it, but correspondingly small form for such a long zoom range. To get much better you'll pay a lot more and have a much bulkier set up.
Thank you! Exactly, I'm very excited as it's my first camera and can't wait to learn everything about it.

Would someone have advice on what to look out for when buying a secondhand camera? Are there certain things I should check or things that are important? Is there something that ensures a camera is in good condition?
 

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