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Small raptor from South Africa, late march (1 Viewer)

Thibaud

Well-known member
Hi everybody,

I've been uploading old photos to inaturalist, and one of my ids has been challenged.
I saw this small raptor perched in a tree near Wilderness (Western Cape, South Africa) in late march of 2016. It was pretty obscured but I IDed it as Little Sparrowhawk.
Now, someone has commented that it could be an African Cuckoo Hawk, based on the broad barring on the belly. Its jizz and the white spots on the shoulders still say Accipiter to me, but I have no further experience with either species.

So, what say the experts?

As always, many thanks in advance,
T
 

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tconzemi

Tom
Supporter
Europe
The broad barring is normal in juvenile plumage of Little SH and African Gos, this bird is moulting from juv to adult and looks better for Little over Gos but these two can be very similar. African Cuckoohawk has very different face
 

Butty

Well-known member
The thick straight dark bars are shown on flank of juv little sparrowhawk in Raptors of the World - not on African goshawk. (And I don't see them shown for either species in other books, including SASOL Birds of Prey.)
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
Cyprus
The thick straight dark bars are shown on flank of juv little sparrowhawk in Raptors of the World - not on African goshawk. (And I don't see them shown for either species in other books, including SASOL Birds of Prey.)
SASOL 5th edition shows them.
 

Thibaud

Well-known member
Thanks gents! I'm glad to have it confirmed as definitely an Accipiter at least. I know I never got a clear shot of the bird, but I'll check if I have others that show more of the breast.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
Cyprus
The OP's bird has thick straight continuous dark bars. The Opus African gos juvenile has broken-up blobby barring (as books show also); pretty different.


I must invest. (I actually referred to SASOL Birds of Prey of Africa - different book from the field guide).
I realised that but I checked ed 4 and ed 5 in the field guide and the illustration has been changed to show these bars.
 

Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
I realised that but I checked ed 4 and ed 5 in the field guide and the illustration has been changed to show these bars.
Andy, do you recommend the 5th Edition? My 4th Ed is getting very worn, falling to bits and taped back together, but has lots of additional notes and the bird names in German, so I am loath to replace it.
 

Andy Hurley

All nations have the right to govern themselves
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
...and/or there's the app option - if you're into such things.
It seems at first glace to be in Kindle format. Which is great if you have a colour Kindle, or phone that takes the kindle app. I need to update mine to get it, which I don't really want to do. I'll wait till my wife upgrades her phone and use her old one. I Only use them in "emergencies", or to use bird apps and my current device is the I phone version 4, which doesn't have access to the newer network systems any more.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
It seems at first glace to be in Kindle format. Which is great if you have a colour Kindle, or phone that takes the kindle app. I need to update mine to get it, which I don't really want to do. I'll wait till my wife upgrades her phone and use her old one. I Only use them in "emergencies", or to use bird apps and my current device is the I phone version 4, which doesn't have access to the newer network systems any more.
Shouldn't the iphone be able to download the kindle app from the app store?

Niels
 

Muppit17

Well-known member
I would be interested in feedback on the app if anyone has used.

The 5th edition appears to be available for £14.31 from amazon.
Kindle version is £9.99

The app is £17.49 - however the app is optimised for on screen use and includes '1000 calls'. Which I guess makes it similar to the Collins Bird Guides app (of which I am a fan) . In addition it says that it will update the app in the future for content - in principle future proofing.
 

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