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Sporophila (1 Viewer)

GMK

Well-known member
Can someone with access to the original Auk paper please provide details of the person commemorated by Sporophila beltoni.
With appreciation and thanks in advance.



James,

I haven’t seen the paper in question in yet (only the bird it describes!), but the species epithet must be a homagem to the late Bill Belton (author of Birds of Rio Grande do Sul, published in two parts in the mid 1980s, in Bull. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist., and translator of Sick’s original Ornitologia brasileira).

All the best,
 

GMK

Well-known member
Is there already a paper about the real status of Sporophila melanops?


In reasonably well-advanced draft, but these things always take longer than most people would imagine, and in this case we are retesting all of the existing genetic data and taking additional samples.
 

Richard Klim

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Southern capuchinos

Campagna, Silveira, Tubaro & Lougheed (in press). Identifying the sister species to the rapid capuchino seedeater radiation (Sporophila, Passeriformes). Auk. [abstract]
 

Richard Klim

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Last edited:

Richard Klim

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Seedeaters & seed finches

Mason & Burns 2013. Molecular phylogenetics of the Neotropical seedeaters and seed-finches (Sporophila, Oryzoborus, Dolospingus). Ornitol Neotrop 24(2): 139–155.

Abstract: The phylogenetic relationships within and among many groups of nine-primaried oscines are yet to be resolved. The Neotropical seedeaters and seed-finches of the closely-related genera Sporophila, Oryzoborus, and Dolospingus have presented avian systematists with a confounding taxonomic puzzle since their initial description. Here, we reconstruct a molecular phylogeny of these three genera to evaluate their reciprocal monophyly and gain insight into species-level relationships within the group. Our phylogenetic analysis, based on 2184 bp of mitochondrial DNA, reveals that Sporophila is paraphyletic as currently defined with respect to Oryzoborus and the monotypic Dolospingus. We included 33 out of 39 currently recognized species in our phylogenetic estimate and describe nine groups within the Neotropical seedeaters and seed-finches based on strongly supported nodes. We found that previous groupings based on male plumage do not represent monophyletic groupings. Rather, there is widespread convergence in basic plumage patterning (i.e., gray, black-and-white) among males of Neotropical seedeaters and seed-finches. Based on known mutation rates of the cyt b region of the mitochondrial genome, we estimate the timing of the most recent common ancestor of this group to have occurred approximately 9.5 million years ago.

[With thanks to Manuel Plenge for reporting on NEOORN.]
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Mason & Burns 2013. Molecular phylogenetics of the Neotropical seedeaters and seed-finches (Sporophila, Oryzoborus, Dolospingus). Ornitol Neotrop 24(2): 139–155.

TiF Update
September 26
Based on Mason and Burns (2013) Dolospingus and Oryzoborus have been merged into Sporophila and Sporophila has been rearranged.
 

Melanie

Well-known member
The description of Sporophila beltoni will be published in the next (=October 2013) issue of The Auk which will be hopefully online soon.
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Another article from the latest issue of the Auk

Identifying the Sister Species to the Rapid Capuchino Seedeater Radiation
(Passeriformes: Sporophila)
Author(s): Leonardo Campagna , Luís Fábio Silveira , Pablo L. Tubaro , and Stephen C. Lougheed
Source: The Auk, 130(4):645-655. 2013.
Published By: The American Ornithologists' Union
URL: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1525/auk.2013.13064
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
P. Benites, L. Campagna & P. Tubaro, 2014. Song-based species discrimination in a rapid Neotropical radiation of grassland seedeaters. Journal of Avian Biology, Accepted article.

Abstract:
Acoustic signals among newly diverged taxa have the potential to convey species identity, information that is key to reducing hybridization. Capuchino seedeaters constitute a remarkable example of recently radiated endemic species from the grasslands of South America. They are sexually dimorphic and show striking differences in male plumage coloration and song. Contrasting with this divergence in phenotype most species show extremely low neutral genetic differentiation and lack of reciprocal monophyly, which is interpreted to be a product of recent common ancestry and hybridization. Here we use field-based playback experiments to test for the first time if males of two species, Sporophila hypoxantha and S. palustris, discriminate between conspecific and heterospecific song. Using various measures of behavior we find that both species react more strongly to their own songs. The response to playback from another southern capuchino cannot be differentiated from that of a control song from a more distantly related Sporophila species. Our finding suggests that song, a culturally inherited trait, may help maintain reproductive isolation between species in the rapid and explosive capuchino radiation.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
P. Benites, L. Campagna & P. Tubaro, 2014. Song-based species discrimination in a rapid Neotropical radiation of grassland seedeaters. Journal of Avian Biology, Accepted article.

Abstract:
Acoustic signals among newly diverged taxa have the potential to convey species identity, information that is key to reducing hybridization. Capuchino seedeaters constitute a remarkable example of recently radiated endemic species from the grasslands of South America. They are sexually dimorphic and show striking differences in male plumage coloration and song. Contrasting with this divergence in phenotype most species show extremely low neutral genetic differentiation and lack of reciprocal monophyly, which is interpreted to be a product of recent common ancestry and hybridization. Here we use field-based playback experiments to test for the first time if males of two species, Sporophila hypoxantha and S. palustris, discriminate between conspecific and heterospecific song. Using various measures of behavior we find that both species react more strongly to their own songs. The response to playback from another southern capuchino cannot be differentiated from that of a control song from a more distantly related Sporophila species. Our finding suggests that song, a culturally inherited trait, may help maintain reproductive isolation between species in the rapid and explosive capuchino radiation.

Published online
 

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