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straight vs angled scope ? (1 Viewer)

Kylie-bird... try using a straight scope to look high into trees (or at the night sky) and, unless you have a 7ft tripod, you'll appreciate the value of an angled one. I would only buy a straight scope if it was pocket-size, like a Kowa 502 and wanted to use it ad-hoc and sans tripod, like when primarily hiking, or from a car.
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Kylie-bird... try using a straight scope to look high into trees (or at the night sky) and, unless you have a 7ft tripod, you'll appreciate the value of an angled one. I would only buy a straight scope if it was pocket-size, like a Kowa 502 and wanted to use it ad-hoc and sans tripod, like when primarily hiking, or from a car.
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try looking from a cliff top at sea birds below ;) ,swings and roundabouts(y)
 
good luck trying to find a bird with scope rotated

It's no different to finding them at any level with an angled scope - it's a simple enough skill.

Plus, with a rotating collar you can share a view with another person, sitting, crouching or lying beside you, without moving yourself, the tripod or scope. Try that with a straight scope. ;)
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That's what a rotating collar is for. ;)
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Yep. See attachments.

Paddyluke: Finding birds is a matter of practice ... 😁 WA eyepieces work better than narrow zooms obviously.

BTW, can you show us how you observe birds of prey circling high above you with a straight scope? :cool:πŸ™ƒ:cool:

Hermann
 

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    Nikon Fieldscope_125206.JPG
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It's no different to finding them at any level with an angled scope - it's a simple enough skill.

Plus, with a rotating collar you can share a view with another person, sitting, crouching or lying beside you, without moving yourself, the tripod or scope. Try that with a straight scope. ;)
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it'll be more difficult to find a bird with angle scope rotated,if upright you can find the line of the bird but not so when rotated, when purchasing a scope you do not want to consider any one else using the scope you are paying for
 
it'll be more difficult to find a bird with angle scope rotated,if upright you can find the line of the bird but not so when rotated,

Like I said, and Hermann agreed, subject acquisition is a simple enough skill to master... but many angled scopes (like Swarovski) have a sight-finder.

when purchasing a scope you do not want to consider any one else using the scope you are paying for

I enjoy sharing with whoever I'm birding with and the collar can make that easier. Handy... if you have friends. ;)
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Some people will want to consider who else might be using their scope. But regardless of how you use your scope, it's another aspect of birding for OP to consider.
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All we can do is point out the pro's and con's of each style and let the OP consider what is best for their particular use - hide work, looking at birds on cliffs, on the ground etc. and then consider their own best way forward to view what they want to see.
There is no right or wrong, just whatever is best for you.
 
Some people will want to consider who else might be using their scope. But regardless of how you use your scope, it's another aspect of birding for OP to consider.
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so if you are considering spending hundreds if not thousands of pounds on a scope then you will consult your mates first to see what they prefer???
 
I mean, I am an angled scope user, but I can't say it's easy to find stuff in rotated collar mode... It's better to have the feature than not to, mind you, but I don't think it's a thing most angled scope users find themselves reverting to all that often.
 
Yep. See attachments.

Paddyluke: Finding birds is a matter of practice ... 😁 WA eyepieces work better than narrow zooms obviously.

BTW, can you show us how you observe birds of prey circling high above you with a straight scope? :cool:πŸ™ƒ:cool:

Hermann
BTW, can you show us how you observe sea birds below when you are high above on cliff top with an angled scope? :cool::):cool:
 
BTW, can you show us how you observe sea birds below when you are high above on cliff top with an angled scope? :cool::):cool:

Hermann has already had the courtesy to reply to this question - #26 - with his images showing the ergonomics of how a rotating collar enables viewing at all angles.

In a thread called: 'Straight vs Angled Scope?', I'm sure people new to scopes will find the images informative, especially as the orientation of the eyepiece in the two images demonstrate that you can sit behind or to one side of the scope - the latter being particularly useful when you're on a slope.
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Hermann has already had the courtesy to reply to this question - #26 - with his images showing the ergonomics of how a rotating collar enables viewing at all angles.

In a thread called: 'Straight vs Angled Scope?', I'm sure people new to scopes will find the images informative, especially as the orientation of the eyepiece in the two images demonstrate that you can sit behind or to one side of the scope - the latter being particularly useful when you're on a slope.
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i know exactly how a rotating collar works on an angled scope, i also have a Nikon Fieldscope EDIIIA
 

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