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The Swarovski My Junior 7x28 (1 Viewer)

So it's the "immersive feeling"? And the FOV and the AFOV don't mean anything? Goodness gracious.

Can you explain this in a bit more detail? Doesn't make sense to me at all.

So the 7x28 Baby Swaro has a "much bigger image" than, say, an old 8x30 porro? Interesting.

Obviously the laws of physics don't apply to the Baby Swaro.

Hermann
 

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I don’t see the logic in not having a diopter adjustment. Even a cheapo binocular in a bubble pack from Walmart usually has a twist type diopter. So far it seems most people seem to be able to work around it, but there’s bound to be lots and lots of people that could never use these binoculars without having a less than perfect image, and that would include kids with less than perfect vision.
At a price point of $500 US for the MY Junior 7x28, the logic might be that Swarovski has taken the practical view that people who can afford this particular binocular with 18 mm eye relief would already have obtained glasses, or contact lenses, as needed for their children. The market size of children needing optical correction who would use this binocular may be relatively small. And removing the diopter correction reduces cost while also making sharing the binocular among people less likely to have unwanted settings. One less knob is easier to use, especially among a beginner crowd.
 
. . .
But I always thought the traditional binocular for the SWAROMAN's kids was a battered old Habicht... Tobias had a charming photo of one of his kids looking through one on his old site.


Hi Patudo,

From Tobias' review of his well used 1961 production 8x30W Habicht:
1961 Habicht 8x30W.jpg


John
 
Old battered porros can be quite good for kids, and for a long time were the only good choice for having good minimum IPD setting. But these new Swarovski roofs seem very nice. I look forward to handling one in person. The only thing that I am disappointed about, based on specs and photos, is the minimum close focus of 4 m. Many kids like to look at insects etc up close, so it is too bad that they don't get down to 2 m or less, which shouldn't have been hard to accomplish in a 7x28 design.

--AP
You can reverse them (i.e. look through the objective) to give a very close focus which partly addresses your point.
 
You can reverse them (i.e. look through the objective) to give a very close focus which partly addresses your point.
Yes, but you can do that w/any bin. I was thinking more about butterflies, frogs, fish, and the like, which allow close approach but not too close. In my experience, it is common for kids to want to look at the things for which the Pentax Papilio are well suited, but unfortunately that bin has a 56 mm minimum IPD, like almost all other reverse-porro compacts, and only works for a minority of small children.

--AP
 
At a price point of $500 US for the MY Junior 7x28, the logic might be that Swarovski has taken the practical view that people who can afford this particular binocular with 18 mm eye relief would already have obtained glasses, or contact lenses, as needed for their children. The market size of children needing optical correction who would use this binocular may be relatively small. And removing the diopter correction reduces cost while also making sharing the binocular among people less likely to have unwanted settings. One less knob is easier to use, especially among a beginner crowd.
At a $500 price point, there is lots of very good glass, and every one of them has an adjustable diopter - and most would be just as suitable for children I would think.
 

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