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What are your priorities in binoculars? (2 Viewers)

I believe eye relief is what you meant in the earlier post 58 :)

Its true that long eye relief adds many complications including weight and cost. Long eye relief + wide AFOV is next level, for a handheld bino.
 
My understanding as a non glasses wearer is that if a binocular has insufficient eye relief to accommodate the distance your pupils are from the eye piece then you will not be able to see the entire fov. If a binocular has sufficient eye relief you will be able to view the whole field of view. This is certainly what I've found when I've used binoculars with sunglasses on when using models with insufficient eye relief, it's something I've done vanishingly infrequently though.

Will
 
My understanding as a non glasses wearer is that if a binocular has insufficient eye relief to accommodate the distance your pupils are from the eye piece then you will not be able to see the entire fov. If a binocular has sufficient eye relief you will be able to view the whole field of view. This is certainly what I've found when I've used binoculars with sunglasses on when using models with insufficient eye relief, it's something I've done vanishingly infrequently though.

Will
Well maybe i will make myself ridiculous but i dont mind: can a binocular have too much eye relief?
The reason i ask this and why i started this "experiment" is that since i have this two Leica's 7x42 i noticed that i can NOT get as close to the occular lens as with all my other binoculars. So that is why i tried the sunglasses 😎
 
Well maybe i will make myself ridiculous but i dont mind: can a binocular have too much eye relief?
The reason i ask this and why i started this "experiment" is that since i have this two Leica's 7x42 i noticed that i can NOT get as close to the occular lens as with all my other binoculars. So that is why i tried the sunglasses 😎
Yes. My slc's are close to having too much, fortunately if you wind the eye pieces back in one notch it actually moves them out couple of mm which is perfect for me, if that feature wasn't present they would have been sold by now.

Will
 
Yes. My slc's are close to having too much, fortunately if you wind the eye pieces back in one notch it actually moves them out couple of mm which is perfect for me, if that feature wasn't present they would have been sold by now.

Will
Same with my Leica 7x42, i just never experienced something like this.
 
I did not express myself well im afraid. What I only meant to say is that the fov with glasses (I used sunglasses only for to see the difference with and without glasses as I don't wear glasses) is much smaller than without glasses. As a non glass wearer I was not aware of this. Nothing more, nothing less. Am I wrong about the perception that you see less wide view with glasses?
Yes you are wrong. I wear spectacles all of the time and can see the full fov of my SF8x32s.
 
I did not express myself well im afraid. What I only meant to say is that the fov with glasses (I used sunglasses only for to see the difference with and without glasses as I don't wear glasses) is much smaller than without glasses. As a non glass wearer I was not aware of this. Nothing more, nothing less. Am I wrong about the perception that you see less wide view with glasses?
Quite correct if a bino has insufficient eye relief you will see less of the Fov. If troubadours 30+ pairs he's reviewed have all got sufficient eye relief which I don't doubt he is also just as right.
 
I did not express myself well im afraid. What I only meant to say is that the fov with glasses (I used sunglasses only for to see the difference with and without glasses as I don't wear glasses) is much smaller than without glasses. As a non glass wearer I was not aware of this. Nothing more, nothing less. Am I wrong about the perception that you see less wide view with glasses?
Depends on the binoculars. And the glasses. However, with binoculars with enough ER you see the entire field of view no problem. That's why Zeiss introduced the designation "B" (for "Brille") when they started making binoculars for the mass market that had enough eyerelief for spectacle wearers, for instance 8x30B.

Hermann
 
Depends on the binoculars. And the glasses. However, with binoculars with enough ER you see the entire field of view no problem. That's why Zeiss introduced the designation "B" (for "Brille") when they started making binoculars for the mass market that had enough eyerelief for spectacle wearers, for instance 8x30B.

Hermann
Thanks Herman, so in general with the latest binocular it’s not an issue if you wear glasses?
 
Quite correct if a bino has insufficient eye relief you will see less of the Fov. If troubadours 30+ pairs he's reviewed have all got sufficient eye relief which I don't doubt he is also just as right.
Is there a limit in eye relieve that you know of where wearing glasses can narrow the fov?
 
Depends. Depends on the binoculars, your eyes and the glasses. That's a complicated topic, and I'd recommend every eyeglass wearer tries out new binoculars before purchasing them.

Hermann
Yes it is complicated, i also think that people who always have worn glasses can not see the difference like people who go from not wearing glasses to wearing glasses.
 
And I’m almost sure that i have read several posts on this forum were people say they can’t use their binoculars as well as before they start wearing glasses…
 
And I’m almost sure that i have read several posts on this forum were people say they can’t use their binoculars as well as before they start wearing glasses…
Yes but some of these people were unaware they should adjust the eyecups when wearing glasses. I have met many people out in the field who had no idea that they should/could adjust the dioptre or eyecups to suit themselves.
 
Well maybe i will make myself ridiculous but i dont mind: can a binocular have too much eye relief?
The reason i ask this and why i started this "experiment" is that since i have this two Leica's 7x42 i noticed that i can NOT get as close to the occular lens as with all my other binoculars. So that is why i tried the sunglasses 😎
Getting your eyes in the right position so that you can see the full field of view without blackouts can be a challenge. If your eyes are too far from the occular lens you can't see the full fov but get too close and you get blackouts. How the eyecup positions, eye relief, and the observer's eyes (which may be sunken or bulging from the face or somewhere in between) work together can be a complex balance for some observers. Trying different eyecup positions can help and I have used rubber o-rings in the past, fitted over the eyecups' lower tubes so I could keep the eyecups at a position not available using the built-in 'click-stops'.

Are you saying you cannot see the full field of view through these Leica 7x42s or are you getting blackouts?
 
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Getting your eyes in the right position so that you can see the full field of view without blackouts can be a challenge. If your eyes are too far from the occular lens you can't see the full fov but get too close and you get blackouts. How the eyecup positions, eye relief, and the observer's eyes (which may be sunken or bulging from the face or somewhere in between) work together can be a complex balance for some observers. Trying different eyecup positions can help and I have used rubber o-rings in the past, fitted over the eyecups' lower tubes so I could keep the eyecups at a position not available using the built-in 'click-stops'.

Are you saying you cannot see the full field of view through these Leica 7x42s or are you getting blackouts?
Thanks for your response and patience Lee, i will try to explain. This whole “experiment” started when one of my Swarovski Habicht’s, the 10x40 GA misted/fogged up and somebody here suggested to put the eyecups down. This helped a lot and i was surprised how close i could get my eye to the eyepiece without getting blackouts while at the same time getting a wider fov. So i tried it with all my bino’s, removing even the eyecups and see what happened. Wider fov! Then i got my Leica 7x42 UV and i needed some “click-stops” with the eyecups to see well. So this made me think that if you wear glasses your distance to the lense is bigger and the fov is smaller. But i might be wrong here I’m afraid, even my wife tells me know….:oops:
 

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